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Jerry Stackhouse

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Title: Jerry Stackhouse  
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Subject: 2005–06 Dallas Mavericks season, 2011–12 Atlanta Hawks season, 2004–05 Dallas Mavericks season, 1995 NBA Draft, 2009–10 Milwaukee Bucks season
Collection: 1974 Births, African-American Basketball Players, Atlanta Hawks Players, Basketball Players at the 1995 Ncaa Men's Division I Final Four, Basketball Players from North Carolina, Brooklyn Nets Players, Dallas Mavericks Players, Detroit Pistons Players, Living People, McDonald's High School All-Americans, Miami Heat Players, Milwaukee Bucks Players, National Basketball Association All-Stars, North Carolina Tar Heels Men's Basketball Players, Parade High School All-Americans (Boys' Basketball), People from Kinston, North Carolina, Philadelphia 76Ers Draft Picks, Philadelphia 76Ers Players, Shooting Guards, Small Forwards, Washington Wizards Players
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Jerry Stackhouse

Jerry Stackhouse
Stackhouse with the Mavericks in 2008
Toronto Raptors
Position Assistant Coach
League NBA
Personal information
Born (1974-11-05) November 5, 1974
Kinston, North Carolina
Nationality American
Listed height 6 ft 6 in (1.98 m)
Listed weight 218 lb (99 kg)
Career information
High school Kinston (Kinston, North Carolina)
Oak Hill Academy
(Mouth of Wilson, Virginia)
College North Carolina (1993–1995)
NBA draft 1995 / Round: 1 / Pick: 3rd overall
Selected by the Philadelphia 76ers
Pro career 1995–2013
Position Shooting guard / Small forward
Number 42, 24
Coaching career 2015–present
Career history
As player:
19951998 Philadelphia 76ers
19982002 Detroit Pistons
20022004 Washington Wizards
20042009 Dallas Mavericks
2010 Milwaukee Bucks
2010 Miami Heat
2011–2012 Atlanta Hawks
2012–2013 Brooklyn Nets
As coach:
2015–present Toronto Raptors (assistant)
Career highlights and awards
Career statistics
Points 16,409 (16.9 ppg)
Rebounds 3,067 (3.2 rpg)
Assists 3,240 (3.3 apg)
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

Jerry Darnell Stackhouse (born November 5, 1974) is a retired American professional basketball player who played 18 seasons in the National Basketball Association (NBA) and currently works as an assistant coach for the Toronto Raptors. He has also worked as an NBA TV analyst.

Contents

  • Early career 1
  • NBA career 2
    • NBA draft 2.1
    • Philadelphia 76ers (1995–1998) 2.2
    • Detroit Pistons (1998–2002) 2.3
    • Washington Wizards (2002–2004) 2.4
    • Dallas Mavericks (2004–2009) 2.5
    • Milwaukee Bucks (2010) 2.6
    • Miami Heat (2010) 2.7
    • Atlanta Hawks (2011–2012) 2.8
    • Brooklyn Nets (2012–2013) 2.9
  • Broadcasting Career 3
  • Coaching Career 4
  • Personal 5
  • Achievements 6
  • NBA career statistics 7
    • Regular season 7.1
    • Playoffs 7.2
  • See also 8
  • References 9
  • External links 10

Early career

Stackhouse was a premier player from the time he was a sophomore in high school. He was the state player of the year for North Carolina in 1991–1992, leading Kinston (N.C) High School to the state finals. His senior year, he played for Oak Hill Academy with future college teammate Jeff McInnis, leading them to an undefeated season. He was a two-time first team Parade All-America selection, and was the MVP of the McDonald's Game. At the 1992 Nike Camp, was considered along with Rasheed Wallace to be the top player at the camp. There were some who considered Stackhouse the top prep player to come out of North Carolina since Michael Jordan.

Stackhouse attended the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill, where he was a teammate of future NBA players Rasheed Wallace, Jeff McInnis and Shammond Williams. In his sophomore season at UNC, Stackhouse led the team in scoring with 19.2 points per game and averaged 8.2 rebounds per contest. He led UNC to a Final Four appearance and was named as the National Player of the Year by Sports Illustrated and earned first-team All-America and All-ACC honors. Following the season, Stackhouse declared his eligibility for the 1995 NBA draft.

Even though he left UNC after two years, he continued working on his degree and received his Bachelor's degree in African American Studies in 1999.

NBA career

NBA draft

Stackhouse was selected in the first round of the 1995 NBA draft with the third pick by the Philadelphia 76ers. At one time he was hyped as the "Next Jordan" since both players played at North Carolina, went #3 in the draft, were listed at 6'6", looked similar physically, and had similarly acrobatic games. Coincidentally, both had a taller power forward from UNC drafted immediately after them in the #4 spot, Sam Perkins in 1984, and Rasheed Wallace in 1995.

Philadelphia 76ers (1995–1998)

In his first season with the 76ers, Stackhouse led his team with a 19.2 points per game (PPG) average, and was named to the NBA's All-Rookie team. In the 1996–97 season, the 76ers also drafted Allen Iverson. Combined, the two posted 44.2 points per game for the Sixers.

Detroit Pistons (1998–2002)

Midway through the 1997–98 season, Stackhouse was dealt to the Detroit Pistons with Eric Montross for Theo Ratliff, Aaron McKie and future considerations. By the 1999–2000 season, his second full season with the Pistons, Stackhouse was averaging 23.6 points per game. A year later, he had a career-high average of 29.8 points per game. In a late season victory over the Chicago Bulls, he set the Pistons' franchise record and the league's season high for points in a game with 57. Stackhouse saw his final action as a Piston with Detroit's elimination in the second round of the 2001–02 NBA playoffs.

Washington Wizards (2002–2004)

During the 2002 offseason, Stackhouse was traded to the Washington Wizards in a six-player deal, also involving Richard Hamilton.

In his first season with Washington (2002–03), Stackhouse led the Wizards in points and assists per game with 21.5 and 4.5 respectively. He missed most of the 2003–04 season while recovering from arthroscopic surgery on his right knee, playing in only 26 games.

Dallas Mavericks (2004–2009)

In the 2004 offseason, Stackhouse—along with Christian Laettner and the Wizards' first-round draft pick (Devin Harris)—was traded to the Dallas Mavericks in exchange for former Tar Heel and NBA All-Star Antawn Jamison. He did not play for 41 games during his first two seasons with Dallas due to groin and continued knee problems, and played mostly the role of sixth man. During the 2004–05 playoffs, Stackhouse began wearing pressure stockings during games to keep his legs warm to aid his groin injury and hold his thigh sleeves in place; the stockings also allowed for better blood flow to the legs. The practice quickly became a trend among NBA players, with Kobe Bryant, Tracy McGrady, Vince Carter, Dwyane Wade, LeBron James and others adopting pressure stockings the following season.

Stackhouse was still coming off the bench as the 6th man for the Dallas Mavericks during the 2005-06 NBA season, however he was a significant factor in the NBA Finals series with the Dallas Mavericks against the Miami Heat. The Mavericks suffered, however, when Stackhouse was suspended for Game 5 for a flagrant foul on Shaquille O'Neal, and the Heat eventually won the series 4–2. Stackhouse was the third player from the Mavericks suspended during the 2006 playoffs.

During the first round of the 2008 NBA Playoffs between the Mavericks and the New Orleans Hornets, Stackhouse had some harsh words for Hornets coach Byron Scott. In a radio interview, Stackhouse said the following:

"I think it's just about having personalities that mesh and I think Chris [Paul] is such a great guy, I think he's been able to kind of deal with Byron Scott. I don't think Byron Scott is the best coach or I don't think he's the best guy to deal with – you know what I'm sayin? – from some things that I've heard from other players and just some dealings that I had with him earlier in the season. I was about ready to kick his ass – you know what I'm sayin? He was sitting on the sideline and we just got into a little conversation or something and he was going to tell me, you know, 'Talk to me when you get a ring.' I was like, I told that fool, 'If I played with Magic and Worthy and Kareem I'd have a ring, too. So, you know, he's a sucker in my book, but that's a whole other story."[1]

Milwaukee Bucks (2010)

Stackhouse was traded to the Memphis Grizzlies on July 8, 2009, in a four way trade. On the day after the trade, Stackhouse was waived by the Grizzlies.[2] On January 17, 2010, the Milwaukee Bucks signed Stackhouse for the remainder of the 2009–10 season.[3]

Miami Heat (2010)

On October 23, 2010, Stackhouse and the Miami Heat agreed to a contract.[4]

On November 23, 2010, the Heat waived Stackhouse to make room for Erick Dampier who was signed to replace injured forward Udonis Haslem.[5]

Atlanta Hawks (2011–2012)

On December 9, 2011, Stackhouse joined the Atlanta Hawks. Stackhouse was chosen to replace injured teammate Joe Johnson[6] as Atlanta's representative in the Haier Shooting Stars Competition during NBA All-Star weekend.[7]

Brooklyn Nets (2012–2013)

On July 11, 2012, Stackhouse made a verbal agreement to sign a one-year, $1.3 million deal with the Nets.[8] He became the first professional athlete to wear the number 42 in Brooklyn since baseball legend Jackie Robinson. On November 26, 2012, the Nets played the New York Knicks for the first time since the Nets had moved to Brooklyn. Stackhouse played 22 minutes and scored 14 points, including a tiebreaking 3-pointer with 3:31 left in overtime, and the Nets went on to win.[9] On March 18, 2013, he scored 10 points against the Detroit Pistons, one of his former teams.[10]

Broadcasting Career

On November 15, 2013, it was announced that Stackhouse had joined Fox Sports Detroit as a Pistons analyst. He will primarily provide studio analysis but will be the road color commentator for FSN DETROIT on select road trips. Stackhouse will also be a college basketball analyst for the ACC Network and FSN DETROIT. By Joining FOX SPORTS DETROIT, Stackhouse will be joining his former Pistons teammate Mateen Cleaves in the studio.

Coaching Career

On June 29, 2015, he was hired to serve as an assistant coach by the Toronto Raptors.[11]

Personal

Jerry Stackhouse went to the Philippines to host the NBA Madness

Stackhouse is the younger brother of former CBA player and one-time Sacramento Kings and Boston Celtics forward Tony Dawson,[12] and the uncle of former Wake Forest University guard Craig Dawson.[13]

Stackhouse has worn the number 42 in honor of Jackie Robinson, his favorite athlete. He has performed the National Anthem before Mavericks home games[14] and during the Bucks' 2010 and the Nets' 2013 playoff appearances. He was formerly a vegetarian, but is now back to eating meat.[15]

Achievements

  • Had the highest point total, 2,380, for the 2000–01 NBA season, but was second in scoring average, 29.8.
  • Became the 106th NBA player to score 15,000 career points, only one game after teammate Dirk Nowitzki surpassed 15,000 points.

NBA career statistics

Regular season

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
1995–96 Philadelphia 72 71 37.5 .414 .318 .747 3.7 3.9 1.1 1.1 19.2
1996–97 Philadelphia 81 81 39.1 .407 .298 .766 4.2 3.1 1.1 .8 20.7
1997–98 Philadelphia 22 22 34.0 .452 .348 .802 3.5 3.0 1.4 1.0 16.0
1997–98 Detroit 57 15 31.5 .428 .208 .782 3.3 3.1 1.0 .7 15.7
1998–99 Detroit 42 9 28.3 .371 .278 .850 2.5 2.8 .8 .5 14.5
1999–00 Detroit 82 82 38.4 .428 .288 .815 3.8 4.5 1.3 .4 23.6
2000–01 Detroit 80 80 40.2 .402 .351 .822 3.9 5.1 1.2 .7 29.8
2001–02 Detroit 76 76 35.3 .397 .287 .858 4.1 5.3 1.0 .5 21.4
2002–03 Washington 70 70 39.2 .409 .290 .878 3.7 4.5 .9 .4 21.5
2003–04 Washington 26 17 29.8 .399 .354 .806 3.6 4.0 .9 .1 13.9
2004–05 Dallas 56 7 28.9 .414 .267 .849 3.3 2.3 .9 .2 14.9
2005–06 Dallas 55 11 27.7 .401 .277 .882 2.8 2.9 .7 .2 13.0
2006–07 Dallas 67 8 24.1 .428 .383 .847 2.2 2.8 .8 .1 12.0
2007–08 Dallas 58 13 24.3 .405 .326 .892 2.3 2.5 .5 .2 10.7
2008–09 Dallas 10 1 16.2 .267 .158 1.000 1.7 1.2 .4 .1 4.2
2009–10 Milwaukee 42 0 20.4 .408 .346 .797 2.4 1.7 .5 .2 8.5
2010–11 Miami 7 1 7.1 .250 .250 .714 1.0 .4 .0 .3 1.7
2011–12 Atlanta 30 0 9.1 .370 .342 .913 .8 .5 .3 .1 3.6
2012–13 Brooklyn 37 0 14.7 .384 .337 .870 .9 .9 .2 .1 4.9
Career 970 564 31.2 .409 .309 .822 3.2 3.3 .9 .5 16.9
All-Star 2 0 14.5 .467 1.000 .000 1.5 2.0 .0 .0 7.5

Playoffs

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
1999 Detroit 5 0 24.8 .391 .250 .857 1.6 1.2 .4 .2 10.0
2000 Detroit 3 3 40.0 .407 .429 .742 4.0 3.3 .7 .0 24.7
2002 Detroit 10 10 36.1 .321 .340 .825 4.3 4.3 .6 .6 17.6
2005 Dallas 13 0 31.0 .386 .400 .864 4.1 2.3 .6 .2 16.1
2006 Dallas 22 1 32.3 .402 .338 .784 2.8 2.5 .5 .3 13.7
2007 Dallas 6 0 28.2 .348 .355 .879 3.7 2.5 .7 .2 14.3
2008 Dallas 5 2 20.4 .316 .167 1.000 3.2 1.2 .2 .0 6.2
2010 Milwaukee 7 0 20.6 .326 .333 .900 1.7 1.1 .7 .1 7.3
2013 Brooklyn 4 0 7.0 .100 .000 .750 1.0 .0 .0 .0 1.3
Career 75 16 28.8 .369 .332 .829 3.1 2.3 .5 .2 13.1

See also

References

  1. ^ Stackhouse no fan of Byron Scott
  2. ^ Grizzlies waive Stackhouse one day after trade
  3. ^ 14-year veteran Stackhouse joins team
  4. ^ Stackhouse signs with Miami Heat
  5. ^ "HEAT Sign Erick Dampier and Waive Guard Jerry Stackhouse".  
  6. ^ "All-Star 2012". NBA.com. 2012-02-24. Retrieved 2012-07-12. 
  7. ^ "All-Star 2012". NBA.com. 2012-02-24. Retrieved 2012-07-12. 
  8. ^ "Nets Sign 17-Year Veteran Jerry Stackhouse To One-Year Deal". CBS News New York. Retrieved 12 July 2012. 
  9. ^ "NETS BEAT KNICKS IN OVERTIME 96-89". nynj.com. nynj. 
  10. ^ BOONE, RODERICK. "Jerry Stackhouse ready anytime to give Nets jolt off bench". newsday.com. newsday. 
  11. ^ "Raptors Announce Assistant Coaching Staff". NBA.com. July 29, 2015. Retrieved July 29, 2015. 
  12. ^ Jerrystackhouse.com – Bio – Oak Hill
  13. ^ Craig Dawson Demon Deacons Men's Basketball profile
  14. ^ ESPN – Los Angeles vs. Dallas Recap, January 18, 2007
  15. ^ ‘Skinny’ Authors Have New Goal: Making Men Buff

External links

  • Official website
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