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Junior Achievement

 

Junior Achievement

Junior Achievement
Founded 1919
Founder Theodore Vail, Horace A. Moses, Winthrop M. Crane
Type 501c3
Location
Area served
Worldwide
Mission To inspire and prepare young people to succeed in a global economy
Website http://www.juniorachievement.org

Junior Achievement (also JA or JA Worldwide) is a financial literacy, work readiness, and entrepreneurship to students in kindergarten through high school.[1][2][3][4]

History

Boys' and Girls' Bureau of the Eastern States League was founded in


  • Official website
  • JA Titan
  • Junior Achievement archives

External links

  1. ^ Daley, Suzanne (28 November 1990). "New World for Junior Achievement". The New York Times. Retrieved 16 May 2012. 
  2. ^ Singer, Penny (18 May 1997). "For Junior Achievers, Volunteers Are Key". The New York Times. Retrieved 16 May 2012. 
  3. ^ Heath, Thomas (13 May 2012). "Value Added: This English major prefers the language of money". The Washington Post. Retrieved 16 May 2012. 
  4. ^ Duchon, Dennis; Green, Stephen G.; Taber, Thomas D. (1 January 1986). "Vertical dyad linkage: A longitudinal assessment of antecedents, measures, and consequences.". Journal of Applied Psychology 71 (1): 56–60.  
  5. ^ "Junior Achievement Records, 1916-2002". Indiana University. Retrieved 16 January 2013. 
  6. ^ Francomano, Joe (1988). Junior Achievement: A History. Colorado Springs, CO: Junior Achievement Inc. p. 153.  "Chapter 12. Impressive Growth, Impressive Quality in the 50s."
  7. ^ Francomano, Joe (1988). Junior Achievement: A History. Colorado Springs, CO: Junior Achievement Inc. p. 153. "Chapter 14. Growth in Enrollment, Quality, and Leadership."
  8. ^ Francomano, Joe (1988). Junior Achievement: A History. Colorado Springs, CO: Junior Achievement Inc. p. 153. 
  9. ^ "Junior Achievement Sparks Student Success". Retrieved 20 September 2012. 
  10. ^ a b "What Is Junior Achievement?". Retrieved 20 September 2012. 

References

Several other organizations have joined Junior Achievement, such as Vlajo in Belgium.

Today, Junior Achievement Worldwide has regional offices in Junior Achievement USA, JA Middle East and Africa (INJAZ Al-Arab), JA YE Europe, JA Asia Pacific, JA Americas, and JA Africa. [10]

Today, Junior Achievement annually reaches 4 million students with programs that teach financial literacy, entrepreneurship and workforce readiness in grades K-12. Programs are delivered by more than 178,000 Junior Achievement volunteers.[9] Globally, JA Worldwide reaches 10.6 million students in 117 countries.[10]

For more than 50 years, the organization was known mostly for the JA Company Program, an after-school program where teens formed student companies, sold stocks, produced a product and sold it in their communities. The student companies were overseen by volunteer advisers from the business community. In 1975, Junior Achievement introduced its first in-school program, Project Business, featuring volunteers from the local business community teaching middle school students about business and personal finance.[8]

Following World War II, the organization grew from a regional into a national organization.[6] In the 1960s, it began to grow internationally, as well.[7]

[5]

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