Kemetism

Private altar of a practitioner in the Czech Republic, with a statue representing Thoth featured prominently.

Kemetism (also Kemeticism, both from Egyptian kmt or Kemet, the native name of Ancient Egypt), also sometimes referred to as Neterism (from ntr (Coptic noute) "deity") or Egyptian Neopaganism, is the contemporary revival of Ancient Egyptian religion and related expressions of religion in classical and late antiquity, emerging during the 1970s. Followers typically call themselves Kemetic(s).

There are several main groups, each of which take a different approach to their beliefs, ranging from eclectic to reconstructionistic. They include, but are not limited to: reconstructed Egyptian polytheism (adopting an academic and philological approach), Kemetic Orthodoxy[1] (which adopts some elements of reconstructionism, but has a non-traditional henotheistic theology) and Neo-Atenism. Tameran Wicca incorporates elements of Wicca.

Contents

  • In popular culture 1
  • See also 2
  • Notes 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

In popular culture

In the Squidbillies episode "Taint Misbehavin", the character Dan Halen converts to Kemetism upon learning he has terminal cancer.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Harrison, PM (2012). Profane Egyptologists: The Revival and Reconstruction of Ancient Egyptian Religion. UCL (University College London).

References

  • Marilyn C. Krogh; Brooke Ashley Pillifant, Kemetic Orthodoxy: Ancient Egyptian Religion on the Internet: A Research Note, Sociology of Religion (2004).
  • Ellen Cannon Reed, Circle of Isis: Ancient Egyptian Magic for Modern Witches (2002), ISBN 978-1-56414-568-0.
  • J. G. Melton, Encyclopedia of American Religions, 5th ed., Detroit (1996).

External links

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.