Khojki script

Khojkī
Type Abugida
Languages Gujarati, Sindhi
Parent systems
Proto-Sinaitic alphabet [a]
Sister systems Gurmukhī
ISO 15924 ,
Direction
Unicode alias
[a] The Semitic origin of the Brahmic scripts is not universally agreed upon.
This article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode characters.

Khojki (Urdu: خوجكى ‎, Sindhi: خوجڪي) or Khojiki was a script used almost exclusively by the Khoja community of parts of South Asia such as Sindh. It was employed primarily to record Muslim Shia Ismaili religious literature, as well as literature for a few secret Shia Muslim sects.

The (Nizari Ismaili) tradition states that Khojki was created by Pir Sadardin (da‘i Pir Sadruddin). He was sent by the Ismaili Imam of the time to spread the Ismaili Muslim faith in South Asia (Jampudip). He did this by singing and teaching Ismaili Muslim Ginans (devotional and religious literature). He then wrote them down in Khojki.

Khojki is a Brahmi-based script of the Sindhi branch of the Landa family, which is a class of mercantile scripts related to Sharada. It is considered to be a refined version of the Lohānākī script that was developed as a liturgical script for recording Ismaili literature. Popular Nizari Ismaili tradition states that Khojki was invented and propagated by Pir Sadruddin (Ṣadr al-Dīn), an Ismaili missionary actively working with the Lohānākī community. Khojki is one of two Landa scripts that were developed into formal liturgical scripts for use by religious communities; the other is Gurmukhi, which was developed for writing the sacred literature of the Sikh tradition. Khojki is also called ‘Sindhi’ and ‘Khwajah Sindhi’

Proposed Unicode support

There is a project to encode the Khojki script in the Unicode standard, for which Anshuman Pandey has submitted a proposal to the Unicode Technical Committee.[1]

See also

References


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