World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

King's Royal Rifle Corps

Article Id: WHEBN0000017330
Reproduction Date:

Title: King's Royal Rifle Corps  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: List of Indian Mutiny Victoria Cross recipients, Field marshal (United Kingdom), Rifleman, Vampire dugout, Natal Field Force
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

King's Royal Rifle Corps

kets

In 1948, for administrative purposes the KRRC was brigaded with the Ox & Bucks Light Infantry and the Rifle Brigade to form the Green Jackets Brigade.

In 1958 the Regiment was re-titled the 2nd Green Jackets, The King's Royal Rifle Corps, as were the two other regiments of the Green Jackets Brigade, re-titled 1st and 3rd Green Jackets respectively. In 1966 the three regiments were amalgamated to form the three battalions of the Royal Green Jackets Regiment (RGJ). In 1992 the 1st Battalion, Royal Green Jackets was disbanded, and the KRRC were renumbered the 1st Battalion, with the 3rd Battalion (former Rifle Brigade) becoming the 2nd Battalion. In 2007, the two-battalion RGJ regiment was amalgamated with the remaining Light Infantry regiments, to form the five Regular and two Territorial battalions of The Rifles.

The regiment's traditions are preserved by the 2nd Battalion, The Rifles, which is a redesignation of the 1st Battalion, Royal Green Jackets.

Territorial Battalions

Soldier of the 60th Royal American Regiment

In World War II these territorial battalions were made formally part of the KRRC as follows:

  • 1st Battalion Queen Victoria's Rifles – 7th Battalion KRRC
  • 2nd Battalion Queen Victoria's Rifles – 8th Battalion KRRC
  • 1st Battalion The Rangers – 9th Battalion KRRC
  • 2nd Battalion The Rangers – 10th Battalion KRRC
  • 1st Battalion The Queen's Westminsters – 11th Battalion KRRC
  • 2nd Battalion The Queen's Westminsters – 12th Battalion KRRC

Cadet Battalions

  • 1st Cadet Battalion, The King’s Royal Rifle Corps
  • Queen Victoria’s Rifles Cadet Corps (re-titled the 2nd Cadet Battalion, The King’s Royal Rifle Corps in 1945)

Over the years the formation of the cadet battalions was changed regularly, due to the changes to do with rules and commanding officer.

The 1st Cadet Battalion owes its foundation to the Reverend Freeman Wills, who was commissioned into the Volunteer Army in the rank of Captain on 26 July 1890. He was also Vicar of St Agatha’s just behind Sun Street, Finsbury Square. On receiving his commission he decided to form a cadet company within the 1st Cadet Battalion, The Royal West Surrey Regiment. The Company quickly expanded to become the 2nd Cadet Battalion, The Royal West Surrey Regiment, at which point he moved the Battalion Headquarters to No. 2 Finsbury Square (and in 1904 to 42 Sun Street, which he had specially built for the purpose). In 1894 he applied to HRH Prince George, Duke of Cambridge, Colonel-in-Chief, to affiliate to the Regiment, with the title of 1st Cadet Battalion, The King’s Royal Rifle Corps. Consent was granted on 8 November 1894 and the Battalion has remained a part of the Regiment ever since.[8]

In the days of its foundation Cadet battalions were privately organized and funded. On becoming a part of The King’s Royal Rifle Corps subscriptions began to flow in and after the commanding officer had spent nearly £1,000, the Battalion was placed on a financial basis, which many Volunteer Corps would have envied. There were to be many ups and down in later years, especially when recognition of the Cadet Force was withdrawn between the two World Wars, but fortunately the enthusiasm and commitment of those involved consistently triumphed over the parsimony of Governments.[8]

In 1900, when volunteers were urgently needed for the South African War, The Commanding Officer, Colonel Freeman Croft-Wills persuaded the War Office to accept a Company of the older Cadets, principally N.C.O.s (Non-Commissioned Officers), the company being enrolled in the City Imperial Volunteers. Around 100 cadets thus served in South Africa with this unit, whilst other Cadets and ex-Cadets served in the R.A.M.C. (Royal Army Medical Corps), and other units. Four were killed in action, one serving with the 1st KRRC at the battle of Dundee, and the others with units of the C.I.V.s. Their comrades erected brass plaques in their memory in the Drill Hall at Sun Street. These are now displayed in the Cadet Company Office here at Davies Street.[8]

In recognition of this service, King Edward VII granted the Battalion the honour of wearing on its accoutrements the Battle Honour “South Africa 1900-1902” (Army Order 151 of 1905). The announcement of this privilege was made to the Battalion by His late Majesty, King George V, then Prince of Wales, when, accompanied by Her Majesty Queen Mary, he distributed the prizes at the Guild Hall in the City of London. The 1st Cadet Battalion KRRC are the only Cadet Unit in the United Kingdom to have been granted such an honour and are permitted to wear the miniature 60th Cap Badge with the single Battle Honour, and call their Cadets “Riflemen”.[8]

The 2nd Cadet Battalion, The King’s Royal Rifle Corps was formed in 1942 when a Home Guard instruction was issued ordering each Home Guard battalion to raise a cadet unit. Lieutenant-Colonel R.L. Clark of Queen Victoria’s Rifles was given the task and on 15 May the Queen Victoria’s Rifles Cadet Corps was born. Over the next three years the unit expanded to five companies, which in April 1945 led to it being re-titled the 2nd Cadet Battalion, The King’s Royal Rifle Corps. In1951 the 1st and 2nd Cadet Battalion were amalgamated. This resulted in the disposal of the Headquarters of the 1st Cadet Battalion at 42 Sun Street. In 1954 the Battalion office of the ‘new’ 1st Cadet Battalion was established at 56 Davies Street, where it remains to this day.[8] [9]

Today the KRRC 1st Cadet Battalion still exists,with the following units making up the Battalion:

  • A Company, 231 KRRC (Paddington) Rifles ACF
  • B Company, 232 KRRC (Westminster) Rifles ACF
  • C Company, 233 KRRC (Camden) Rifles ACF
  • D Company, 234 KRRC (Putney) RGJ ACF; until recently when they formed the London Oratory School RGJ ACF unit (now CCF), although they were rebadged as Irish Guards in 2010 (making them the last remaining RGJ unit).

Alliances

Titles

  • 1755 - The 62nd (Royal American) Foot
  • 1757 - renumbered The 60th (Royal American) Foot
  • 1824 - The 60th, Duke of York's Own Rifle Corps
  • 1830 - The 60th, The King's Royal Rifle Corps
  • 1881 - The King's Royal Rifle Corps
  • 1958 - redesignated 2nd Green Jackets (The King's Royal Rifle Corps)
  • 1966 - Succeeded by 2nd Battalion, The Royal Green Jackets (The King's Royal Rifle Corps)
  • 1968 - renamed 2nd Battalion, The Royal Green Jackets
  • 1992 - renamed 1st Battalion, The Royal Green Jackets
  • 2007 - Succeeded by 2nd Battalion, The Rifles

See also

References

  1. ^ Russell, Prof. W.M.S. (Rifleman, 12th Battalion KRRC, 1944-45) A Note on the Regimental March. KRRC Assn. website
  2. ^ Wallace, Capt. Nesbit Willoughby, A Regimental Chronicle and List of Officers of The 60th, or the Kings Royal Rifle Corps, formerly the 62nd, or the Royal American Regiment of Foot. (London: 1879), page 1. https://archive.org/details/regimentalchroni00walluoft
  3. ^ History of the 60th Regiment of Foot, the Royal Americans. http://home.fuse.net/usmilhist/rar/page1.html
  4. ^ "Siege and Capture of Havana in 1762" by Robert Brown, Maryland Historical Magazine, March 1909, Vol.4 No.1, page 324. http://books.google.com/books?id=ubs1AAAAIAAJ&pg=PA324&lpg=PA324&dq=Royal+American+Regiment+of+Foot&source=bl&ots=AVGkIXxid2&sig=b6BDCgp9DCwucAz_eNXRe72ImYA&hl=en&ei=LX9sSuXaBsGktgeGnvyaAQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=5
  5. ^ a b c d Military Heritage
  6. ^ Raising of the 7th Battalion of the 60th Regiment for North America, by Keith Raynor War of 1812
  7. ^ KRRC VC's
  8. ^ a b c d e Wallace, Lt.-Gen. Sir Christopher, The King's Royal Rifle Corps ... the 60th Rifles - A Brief History: 1755 to 1965 Appendix D Territorials, Militia and Cadets, pp.235-236, Royal Green Jackets Museum Trust, Winchester, 2005 Rifles Museum Bookshop
  9. ^ Text on cadets from Wallace's The King's Royal Rifle Corps ... the 60th Rifles - A Brief History: 1755 to 1965 published on KRRC Association website

Publications

  • Wallace, Lt.-Gen. Sir Christopher, The King's Royal Rifle Corps ... the 60th Rifles - A Brief History: 1755 to 1965, Royal Green Jackets Museum Trust, Winchester, 2005, ISBN 0-9549-3700-7 Rifles Museum
  • Deedes, WF & Wake, Sir Hereward (eds.), Swift and Bold: the story of the King's Royal Rifle Corps in the Second World War 1939-1945, Gale and Polden, Aldershot, 1949
  • Collett, Capt. R.L., The History of 1st Cadet Battalion, The King's Royal Rifle Corps: Centenary 1894-1994 (undated pamphlet)
  • Fairlie Wood, Herbert, Famous Regiments: The King's Royal Rifle Corps (1967)
  • various, The Annals of the King's Royal Rifle Corps, 1755-1965 (Seven volumes & an Appendix) Celer et Audax Club/Gale and Polden, 1913 to 1979
  • Daniel Marston. Swift and Bold: The 60th Regiment and Warfare in North America, 1755-1765
  • Nesbit Wallace. A Regimental chronicle and list of officers: The 60th, or The King's Royal Rifle Corps formerly the 62nd, or The Royal American Regiment of Foot

External links

  • The King's Royal Rifles Association website
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.