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Kronk's New Groove

Kronk's New Groove
Directed by Elliot M. Bour
Saul Andrew Blinkoff
Produced by Prudence Fenton
John A. Smith
Screenplay by Tom Rogers
Anthony Leondis (story)
Michael LaBash (story)
Based on The Emperor's New Groove by Mark Dindal (uncredited)
Starring Patrick Warburton
Tracey Ullman
Eartha Kitt
John Goodman
Wendie Malick
John Mahoney
John Fiedler
David Spade
Narrated by David Spade
Music by Jeanine Tesori
Edited by Philip Malamuth
Arthur D. Noda
Production
company
Distributed by Walt Disney Pictures
Release dates
December 13, 2005 (2005-12-13)
Running time
72 minutes
Country United States
Language English

Kronk's New Groove (also known as The Emperor's New Groove 2: Kronk's New Groove) is a 2005 direct-to-video animated musical comedy film released by The Walt Disney Company on December 13, 2005. The film is the sequel and spin-off to the 2000 animated film The Emperor's New Groove, and features reprises of the roles of David Spade, John Goodman, Eartha Kitt, Patrick Warburton and Wendie Malick from the original film, with new voices by John Mahoney and Tracey Ullman.

Contents

  • Plot 1
  • Cast 2
  • Reception 3
  • Annie Awards 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

Plot

Emperor Kuzco (David Spade) narrates the story about Kronk Pepikrankenitz (Patrick Warburton), now chef and Head Delivery Boy of Mudka's Meat Hut, is fretting over the upcoming visit of his father. Kronk's father always disapproved of young Kronk's culinary interests and wished that Kronk instead would settle down with a wife and a large house on a hill.

In a flashback, Kronk tells the story of how he almost had both of these. As unwitting accomplice to Yzma (Eartha Kitt), the villainess of the first film who turned into a cat at the end of the original, but is now human again despite still having a tail, he goes along with her plan to sell sewer slime as a youth potion, he makes enough money to buy the old folks' home from the old folks and put his large new home there. Eventually Yzma is revealed as a fake and the old folks chase her down and corner her at a bridge over a river full of crocodiles. To prevent them from attacking her, she transforms herself into a rabbit, but is then caught and taken away by a condor. When Kronk realizes the old folks have sold everything they own in return for something which doesn't work, he gives his home back to them.

Kronk, as camp counselor of the Junior Chipmunks at Camp Chippamunka he falls in love with fellow counselor Miss Birdwell (Tracey Ullman); but when one of his Chipmunks, Tipo, pulls a prank to win the camp championships and is caught, Kronk protects the boy at the cost of alienating his love.

Kronk's father (John Mahoney) arrives and confusion ensues as several supportive friends try to pass themselves off to him as Kronk's wife and kids. But in the end Kronk realizes that his wealth is in his friendships, and this finally wins his father's thumbs up and Miss Birdwell's love.

Meanwhile, just outside the house, Yzma is in the condor's nest with two eggs, which hatch and presumably attack her before the credits roll.

Cast

Reception

The film received negative reviews and currently holds a 0% approval rating by the critics on Rotten Tomatoes. Many film critics have stated that the film "has great voice talents, but weak storylines and not much groove." Others have stated that the film shows that Kronk "works best in small doses" and the film should not have centered around him.[1]

Annie Awards

The film was nominated in 2006 for the following Annie Awards:[2]

  • Best Home Entertainment Production
  • Best Storyboarding in an Animated Feature Production
  • Best Writing in an Animated Feature Production

References

  1. ^ "Kronk's New Groove (2005)". Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved January 24, 2014. 
  2. ^ "33rd Annual Annie Nominations and Awards Recipients". International Animated Film Society ASIFA Hollywood. Retrieved January 24, 2014. 

External links

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