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Leeds and Selby Railway

Leeds and Selby Railway
Fate track owned by Network Rail, services by various operators
Predecessor Leeds and Hull Railroad Company (1824) unbuilt
Successor leased and acquired by
York and North Midland Railway 1844
merged into
North Eastern Railway 1854
London and North Eastern Railway 1923
British Rail 1948
Founded 1830 (Act of Parliament)
1834 (Opening)

The Leeds and Selby Railway was an early British railway company and first mainline railway within Yorkshire. It was opened in 1834.

As built the line ran west/east between two termini : Marsh Lane station, Leeds and Selby railway station. The company was leased and then acquired by the York and North Midland Railway in 1840 and 1844; the line remained in use through the subsequent NER, LNER, BR and post-privatisation periods.

Use of the line was expanded through junction connections to new railways, most built in the late 19th century : a junction with the York and North Midland Railway in 1839; an end on junction at Selby to Hull (Hull and Selby Railway, 1840); a through route into Leeds and westward (Leeds viaduct extension, 1869); a shortened route to York (Micklefield to Church Fenton, 1869); a line to Wetherby (Cross Gates to Wetherby Line, 1876, closed 1964); a line to Castleford (Garforth to Castleford Line, 1878, closed 1969); and a line avoiding Selby for Goole (Selby to Goole Line, 1910, closed 1965), as well as a number of minor and industrial lines and sidings. The Selby diversion of the East Coast Main Line (1983) also made junctions with the Leeds and Selby.

As of 2014 the line is still in mainline use and use for services operated by First TransPennine Express and Northern Rail for services from Leeds to Selby, Hull, and York and beyond.

Contents

  • The Leeds and Selby Railway Company (1830–1844) 1
    • Background 1.1
      • The Leeds and Hull Railway 1.1.1
    • Formation of the Leeds and Selby Railway Company 1.2
    • Construction, infrastructure and rolling stock 1.3
      • Route and stations 1.3.1
      • Locomotives and rolling stock 1.3.2
    • Opening and operation 1.4
    • Connections with other railway lines 1.5
      • York and North Midland Railway 1.5.1
      • Hull and Selby Railway 1.5.2
      • Aberford Railway 1.5.3
  • History, 1840–present 2
    • Lease and acquisition by the York and North Midland (1840–1854) 2.1
    • NER period (1854–1923) 2.2
    • LNER period (1923–1948) 2.3
    • BR and post-privatisation period (1948–) 2.4
  • Electrification 3
  • Popular culture 4
  • See also 5
  • Notes 6
  • References 7
    • Sources 7.1
    • Further reading 7.2
  • External links 8

The Leeds and Selby Railway Company (1830–1844)

Background

By 1830 Leeds had long been an important town, having become prosperous initially through the manufacture of woollen cloth. The Leeds and Liverpool Canal was complete and the Aire and Calder Navigation connected Leeds to the Ouse, and thus to the North Sea and beyond.[1] Selby had grown in importance as a port since the construction of the Selby Canal and had become an important inland east coast port for coastal and foreign trade.

As early as 1814[note 1] the Leeds Mercury had printed letters promoting the idea of a railway from Leeds to Selby.[3]

The Leeds and Hull Railway

The Leeds and Hull Railroad Company was formed in 1824 in Leeds. Joseph Locke to survey the line.[4]

Stephenson recommended a double track railway, operated by locomotives at a speed of 8 mph (13 km/h).[5] The hills on the route out of Leeds were to have three inclined planes to be worked by three stationary engines. The remainder of the line was to be very nearly level.[6]

The company was one of a number of contemporary projects aimed at linking the east and west sides of northern England, such as the Newcastle and Carlisle Railway (act of Parliament 1829) and the Liverpool and Manchester Railway (act of Parliament 1826). The Manchester and Leeds Railroad Company was formed in 1825, and would have completed the Lancashire to Yorkshire link.[4] Representatives of the company were present at the opening of the Stockton and Darlington Railway in 1825.[7] Of these schemes the Leeds and Hull, and the Manchester and Leeds were not immediately acted upon, in part due to the stock market crash of 1825.[8][note 2] The Leeds and Hull scheme stagnated, and in the meantime the Knottingley and Goole Canal (an extension of the Aire and Calder Navigation) opened in 1826 bringing the village of Goole from obscurity, and turning it into a viable transhipment port for Europe.

The growth of Goole as a port to rival Hull was sufficient to spur the Hull-based shareholders of the Leeds and Hull railway into action; at the end of 1828 they motioned that the railway should be built as far as Selby, with the remainder of the journey to Hull being made by steam packet, most importantly, bypassing Goole. The shareholders passed the proposal at a general meeting in Leeds on 20 March 1829, and the Leeds and Selby Railway Company was formed.[8]

Formation of the Leeds and Selby Railway Company

The Leeds and Hull railway scheme of 1824 was revived as a shortened line from Leeds to Selby and was resurveyed by James Walker in 1829;[9] Benjamin Gott, one of the line's promoters and a wool and cloth magnate thought the inclined planes would be a disadvantage.[6]

James Walker reported that the stationary engines could be abandoned, and tunnels and cuttings built in their place. He expected that the additional cost of their construction would be offset by use of the stone elsewhere on the railway. and by its sale. The railway would also be of use for the transportation of coal and stone from quarries and mines near the line, such as the Huddlestone quarry. Additionally he suggested that the route of the railway could also be used for the piping of clean water to Leeds. As to the route of the railway, he suggested resiting the Leeds terminus at cheaper and less developed land around Marsh Lane instead of at Far Bank. The resurveyed line was also deviated to the north away from the river bank, to avoid the objections of the Aire and Calder Undertakers; this more northern path would require passing Richmond Hill requiring either stationary engines or a tunnel; Walker recommended the latter. Outside Leeds minor deviations were made in order for the line to cross the north-south turnpikes using bridges. At Selby the new plan sited the station further south than the original, which had been sited next to the road bridge, with the intention of crossing the River Ouse by widening this bridge; with the line no longer going to Hull, but terminating at Selby a site with more space for wharves and jetties was required. He recommended a double track line, with sufficient land acquired for a four track line.[10]

Much of the line was to be built on land belonging to the shareholders, including Edward Robert Petre who owned land in Selby, and Richard Oliver Gascoigne (who later had built the Aberford Railway). Mr. Walker's alterations to Stephenson's original plan were accepted unaltered and put before Parliament.[11]

Despite strong opposition from the Aire and Calder Navigation who had a practical monopoly on transportation in the area, a bill was passed in Parliament on 29 May 1830 allowing construction of the line. The company was allowed to raise a total of £300,000 in shares and loans.[12][13][note 3] The company's directors were James Audus, Edward Baines, Thomas Davison Bland, John Broadley, Richard Oliver Gascoigne, Benjamin Gott, Robert Harrison, John Marshall, John Cowham Parker, the Hon. Edward Robert Petrie, John Scholefield and John Wilson. Samuel Wilks Waud was the first company chairman.[14]

Construction, infrastructure and rolling stock

Two contractors, Messrs. Nowell & Sons, and Messrs. Hamer & Pratt, were chosen to carry out the construction of the line. Nowell began construction of the two miles out of Leeds on 1 October 1830,[note 4] and Hamer & Pratt began work in February 1831 on the remaining 18 miles to Selby.[14]

The primary engineering feature of the line was the tunnel through Richmond Hill in Leeds. It was 700 yards (640 m) long, with its western entrance at 8 chains (160 m) from the Leeds terminus. The tunnel's cross section was that of a horseshoe arch, 22 ft (6.7 m) at its widest, and 17 ft (5.2 m) high from the level of the rails. The construction of the tunnel required the sinking of three shafts, subsequently retained for ventilation.[15][16] Excavation of the tunnel yielded mostly shale and coal, with the remaining third being stone which was used as foundations for other parts of the line. The arch was lined with two courses of brickwork, lengthways to a thickness of 20 inches. In some places three courses were used, depending on the strength of the surrounding ground. Volcanic matter was used in the mortar, to obtain a quick-setting and strong cement.[17] The entrances of the tunnel were faced with stone.[18] There were once reflectors at the base of the shafts, designed to reflect light onto the whitewashed walls of the tunnel.[19] The shafts were found to be useful for ventilation, but the experiment with illuminating the interior with reflect light was of limited utility to passengers; lamps were provided to light the carriages.[16] Despite these efforts, an early passenger reported that on entering the tunnel:

We were immediately enveloped in total darkness, and every one of the carriages filled with smoke and steam to a most annoying degree
— Mechanic's magazine (1835), [20][21]
Cross section diagram of Leeds and Selby railway chair, key and rail

As built, the line had 43 bridges and around 16 level crossings.[22] Ballast was of stone chips; the rails were held in place by keys lodged into iron chairs which rested on and were fixed to stone blocks or larch sleepers. On some parts of the line a ladder track arrangement of sleepers was used, with longitudinal stone sleepers of 3 ft (0.91 m) held in gauge by transverse cast-iron rods. T or bar-shaped malleable iron rails of 35 lb per yard (about 17.4 kgm−1) were initially used, within a few years 42 lb/yd (about 20.8kgm−1) rails were being introduced.[22][23]

Cuttings and embankments were built to keep the gradient of the line to a minimum. The deepest cutting was 43 ft (13 m), the highest embankment was 54 ft (16 m).[24] Both embankments and cuttings had stone retaining walls at the base, at an angle of 67.5 to the horizontal, which reduced the overall width of the earthworks. The line was built as a double-track railway.[22]

Route and stations

After 8 chains (160 m) of level track outside the Leeds terminus the line generally ascended for a distance of at a maximum slope of 1 in 160; it was then level for 2 miles 61 chains (4.45 km), after which it generally descended eastwards towards Selby for 6 miles 6 chains (9.78 km) with a maximum rate of descent of 1 in 137. The final 6 miles 41 chains (10.48 km) to Selby was practically level with a rate of descent of only 1 in 3785. The highest point was 132 ft (40 m) above the Leeds terminus, with the whole line having a net descent of 100 ft (30 m) towards Selby.[22]

The Marsh Lane terminus in Leeds, and the station at Selby, were early examples of what would become 'railway architecture' – both were long rectangular sheds, with wooden trussed roofs, supported internally on cast iron columns.[25] The stations served for both passenger and freight, with additional tracks external to the sheds for coal, there was no platform for passengers. Both stations had coal depots, the Leeds station contained the facilities for maintenance of engines and wagons.[24][26] The rear of the Selby station backed onto the Ouse, across a road (Ousegate) from jetties that would allow a continuation of the journey to Hull.[27]

After the station at Marsh Lane in Leeds there were stations at Cross Gates, Garforth, Micklefield, Milford, and Hambleton.[28]

Locomotives and rolling stock

The original engines were of the lightweight four-wheeled "Bury" type[29] from Edward Bury of Liverpool. They were shown to lack traction sufficient for the line, and were sold. Replacements were obtained from Fenton, Murray and Jackson of (Leeds) and from Kirtley & Co. of Warrington.[30]

There were first and second-class carriages, horse boxes and wagons – including privately owned wagons.[31]

Opening and operation

By 22 September 1834 a single complete line of track had been built, and the railway was officially opened. A train of ten carriages, hauled by the locomotive "Nelson", set out from Marsh Lane station in Leeds at 6.30 am. To the embarrassment or amusement of those present the locomotive got into difficulty on the incline at the tunnel. The wheels began to slip on wet rails, and despite the application of ash on the rails initial progress was no better than walking pace. Once the high point of the line was reached better progress was made- at Garforth, on a stretch of track falling 1 in 180 a speed of 20 mph (32 km/h) was attained. Selby was reached before 9 am. The return journey took 1 hour and sixteen minutes. On the 23rd two trains were run each way, and with a better timing of 1 hour and five minutes from Leeds to Selby.[32][33]

Both lines of track were complete by 15 December, on which date the railway began to take goods traffic.[34]

In The Railways of Britain and Ireland practically described and illustrated Francis Whishaw ascribed the poor financial performance of the railway to the management of the line; after six years of existence the railway was returning a profit, but the average dividend on a £100 share over 1837–40 was a meagre one pound sixteen shillings and nine pence.[35]

As a result of the opening of the line, the Aire and Calder Navigation had to make considerable reductions in their charges.[36] Previously that company's monopoly had resulted in a dividend on shares of over 200%.[37]

Connections with other railway lines

York and North Midland Railway

On 29 May 1839 the first section of

External links

  • , contemporary analysis of the competitive threat from the York and North Midland Railway, and the prospects of the Leeds and Selby Railway

Further reading

    • , including illustrative plates
    • , without the illustrative plates
  • , reprinted 1970 with preface by Ken Hoole

Sources

  1. ^
  2. ^
  3. ^ The London & North Eastern Railway (LNER) Encyclopedia: The Leeds and Selby Railway, "Early History"
  4. ^ a b {{Navbox |name = Television drama series |title = Television drama series |state = autocollapse |listclass = hlist |group1 = By location

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  5. ^ Tomlinson 1915, pp. 98–99.
  6. ^ a b {{Navbox |name = Television drama series |title = Television drama series |state = autocollapse |listclass = hlist |group1 = By location

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  7. ^ Tomlinson 1915, p. 114.
  8. ^ a b {{Navbox |name = Television drama series |title = Television drama series |state = autocollapse |listclass = hlist |group1 = By location

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  9. ^ Hoole 1986, p. 29.
  10. ^ James Walker's report: "To the Committee of the proposed Leeds and Selby Railway Company", 18 July 1829, reprinted in full in {{Navbox |name = Television drama series |title = Television drama series |state = autocollapse |listclass = hlist |group1 = By location

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  11. ^ MacTurk 1879, pp. 33–35, 21(note).
  12. ^ {{Navbox |name = Television drama series |title = Television drama series |state = autocollapse |listclass = hlist |group1 = By location

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  13. ^ Whishaw 1842, p. 173.
  14. ^ a b {{Navbox |name = Television drama series |title = Television drama series |state = autocollapse |listclass = hlist |group1 = By location

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  15. ^ {{Navbox |name = Television drama series |title = Television drama series |state = autocollapse |listclass = hlist |group1 = By location

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  16. ^ a b
  17. ^ Parsons 1835, pp. 61–63.
  18. ^ {{Navbox |name = Television drama series |title = Television drama series |state = autocollapse |listclass = hlist |group1 = By location

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  19. ^ Tomlinson 1915, p. 253.
  20. ^
  21. ^ Tomlinson 1915, p. 259.
  22. ^ a b c d {{Navbox |name = Television drama series |title = Television drama series |state = autocollapse |listclass = hlist |group1 = By location

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  23. ^ {{Navbox |name = Television drama series |title = Television drama series |state = autocollapse |listclass = hlist |group1 = By location

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    • [[Procedural drama|P#REDIRECT, diagrams of rail and track transverse cross section.
  24. ^ a b {{Navbox |name = Television drama series |title = Television drama series |state = autocollapse |listclass = hlist |group1 = By location

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    |group3 = List by country

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  25. ^ Brees, pp. 133–134, First series, plates 62 and 63.
  26. ^ {{Navbox |name = Television drama series |title = Television drama series |state = autocollapse |listclass = hlist |group1 = By location

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  27. ^
  28. ^ Parsons 1835, pp. 241–243.
  29. ^ *Whishaw. F., (1842), London: Weale
  30. ^ Tomlinson 1915, pp. 391–2.
  31. ^ Whishaw 1842, pp. 179–180.
  32. ^ Tomlinson 1915, pp. 256–7.
  33. ^ Parsons 1835, pp. 77–79.
  34. ^ Tomlinson 1915, pp. 259–260.
  35. ^ Whishaw 1842, pp. 173, 182–184.
  36. ^ {{Navbox |name = Television drama series |title = Television drama series |state = autocollapse |listclass = hlist |group1 = By location

    |list1 =

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  37. ^ Tomlinson 1915, p. 205.
  38. ^ a b c d {{Navbox |name = Television drama series |title = Television drama series |state = autocollapse |listclass = hlist |group1 = By location

    |list1 =

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  39. ^ Hoole 1986, pp. 29–30.
  40. ^ Ordnance Survey. Town plans 1:1056, 1849
  41. ^ Tomlinson 1915, pp. 341–342.
  42. ^ Tomlinson 1915, pp. 453, 778.
  43. ^ a b c Hoole 1986, p. 37.
  44. ^ Tomlinson 1915, pp. 612, 616.
  45. ^
  46. ^
  47. ^ Tomlinson 1915, pp. 612, 616–7, 634–5.
  48. ^
  49. ^ Railway Times 13 February 1869, pp.165, col.1.
  50. ^ Tomlinson 1915, pp. 651, 703.
  51. ^ a b c The London and North Eastern Railway (LNER) Encyclopedia, The Leeds and Selby Railway
  52. ^ Hoole 1986, p. 34.
  53. ^ Railway Times 13 February 1869, p.165, col.2.
  54. ^ a b
  55. ^ , via www.barwickinelmethistoricalsociety.com
  56. ^ Tomlinson 1915, pp. 665, 682.
  57. ^ a b
  58. ^
  59. ^
  60. ^
  61. ^
  62. ^
  63. ^
  64. ^
  65. ^
  66. ^
  67. ^
  68. ^
  69. ^
  70. ^
  71. ^
  72. ^
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-- Hatnote -- -- Produces standard hatnote text. Implements the template.


function p._formatLink(link, display) -- Find whether we need to use the colon trick or not. We need to use the -- colon trick for categories and files, as otherwise category links -- categorise the page and file links display the file. checkType('_formatLink', 1, link, 'string') checkType('_formatLink', 2, display, 'string', true) link = removeInitialColon(link) local namespace = p.findNamespaceId(link, false) local colon if namespace == 6 or namespace == 14 then colon = ':' else colon = end -- Find whether a faux display value has been added with the | magic -- word. if not display then local prePipe, postPipe = link:match('^(.-)|(.*)$') link = prePipe or link display = postPipe end -- Find the display value. if not display then local page, section = link:match('^(.-)#(.*)$') if page then display = page .. ' § ' .. section end end -- Assemble the link. if display then return string.format('%s', colon, link, display) else return string.format('%s%s', colon, link) end end

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-- Format link -- -- Makes a wikilink from the given link and display values. Links are escaped -- with colons if necessary, and links to sections are detected and displayed -- with " § " as a separator rather than the standard MediaWiki "#". Used in -- the template.


function p.makeWikitextError(msg, helpLink, addTrackingCategory) -- Formats an error message to be returned to wikitext. If -- addTrackingCategory is not false after being returned from -- Module:Yesno, and if we are not on a talk page, a tracking category -- is added. checkType('makeWikitextError', 1, msg, 'string') checkType('makeWikitextError', 2, helpLink, 'string', true) yesno = require('Module:Yesno') local title = mw.title.getCurrentTitle() -- Make the help link text. local helpText if helpLink then helpText = ' (help)' else helpText = end -- Make the category text. local category if not title.isTalkPage and yesno(addTrackingCategory) ~= false then category = 'Hatnote templates with errors' category = string.format( '%s:%s', mw.site.namespaces[14].name, category ) else category = end return string.format( '%s', msg, helpText, category ) end

function p.formatPageTables(...) -- Takes a list of page/display tables and returns it as a list of -- formatted links. Nil values are not allowed. local pages = {...} local links = {} for i, t in ipairs(pages) do checkType('formatPageTables', i, t, 'table') local link = t[1] local display = t[2] links[i] = p._formatLink(link, display) end return links end

function p.formatPages(...) -- Formats a list of pages using formatLink and returns it as an array. Nil -- values are not allowed. local pages = {...} local ret = {} for i, page in ipairs(pages) do ret[i] = p._formatLink(page) end return ret end

function p.findNamespaceId(link, removeColon) -- Finds the namespace id (namespace number) of a link or a pagename. This -- function will not work if the link is enclosed in double brackets. Colons -- are trimmed from the start of the link by default. To skip colon -- trimming, set the removeColon parameter to true. checkType('findNamespaceId', 1, link, 'string') checkType('findNamespaceId', 2, removeColon, 'boolean', true) if removeColon ~= false then link = removeInitialColon(link) end local namespace = link:match('^(.-):') if namespace then local nsTable = mw.site.namespaces[namespace] if nsTable then return nsTable.id end end return 0 end

local function removeInitialColon(s) -- Removes the initial colon from a string, if present. return s:match('^:?(.*)') end

local function getArgs(frame) -- Fetches the arguments from the parent frame. Whitespace is trimmed and -- blanks are removed. mArguments = require('Module:Arguments') return mArguments.getArgs(frame, {parentOnly = true}) end


-- Helper functions


local p = {}

local libraryUtil = require('libraryUtil') local checkType = libraryUtil.checkType local mArguments -- lazily initialise Module:Arguments local yesno -- lazily initialise Module:Yesno


return p-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- -- Module:Hatnote -- -- -- -- This module produces hatnote links and links to related articles. It -- -- implements the and meta-templates and includes -- -- helper functions for other Lua hatnote modules. --

end

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function p.hatnote(frame) local args = getArgs(frame) local s = args[1] local options = {} if not s then return p.makeWikitextError( 'no text specified', 'Template:Hatnote#Errors', args.category ) end options.extraclasses = args.extraclasses options.selfref = args.selfref return p._hatnote(s, options) end


-- Hatnote -- -- Produces standard hatnote text. Implements the template.


function p._formatLink(link, display) -- Find whether we need to use the colon trick or not. We need to use the -- colon trick for categories and files, as otherwise category links -- categorise the page and file links display the file. checkType('_formatLink', 1, link, 'string') checkType('_formatLink', 2, display, 'string', true) link = removeInitialColon(link) local namespace = p.findNamespaceId(link, false) local colon if namespace == 6 or namespace == 14 then colon = ':' else colon = end -- Find whether a faux display value has been added with the | magic -- word. if not display then local prePipe, postPipe = link:match('^(.-)|(.*)$') link = prePipe or link display = postPipe end -- Find the display value. if not display then local page, section = link:match('^(.-)#(.*)$') if page then display = page .. ' § ' .. section end end -- Assemble the link. if display then return string.format('%s', colon, link, display) else return string.format('%s%s', colon, link) end end

function p.formatLink(frame) local args = getArgs(frame) local link = args[1] local display = args[2] if not link then return p.makeWikitextError( 'no link specified', 'Template:Format hatnote link#Errors', args.category ) end return p._formatLink(link, display) end


-- Format link -- -- Makes a wikilink from the given link and display values. Links are escaped -- with colons if necessary, and links to sections are detected and displayed -- with " § " as a separator rather than the standard MediaWiki "#". Used in -- the template.


function p.makeWikitextError(msg, helpLink, addTrackingCategory) -- Formats an error message to be returned to wikitext. If -- addTrackingCategory is not false after being returned from -- Module:Yesno, and if we are not on a talk page, a tracking category -- is added. checkType('makeWikitextError', 1, msg, 'string') checkType('makeWikitextError', 2, helpLink, 'string', true) yesno = require('Module:Yesno') local title = mw.title.getCurrentTitle() -- Make the help link text. local helpText if helpLink then helpText = ' (help)' else helpText = end -- Make the category text. local category if not title.isTalkPage and yesno(addTrackingCategory) ~= false then category = 'Hatnote templates with errors' category = string.format( '%s:%s', mw.site.namespaces[14].name, category ) else category = end return string.format( '%s', msg, helpText, category ) end

function p.formatPageTables(...) -- Takes a list of page/display tables and returns it as a list of -- formatted links. Nil values are not allowed. local pages = {...} local links = {} for i, t in ipairs(pages) do checkType('formatPageTables', i, t, 'table') local link = t[1] local display = t[2] links[i] = p._formatLink(link, display) end return links end

function p.formatPages(...) -- Formats a list of pages using formatLink and returns it as an array. Nil -- values are not allowed. local pages = {...} local ret = {} for i, page in ipairs(pages) do ret[i] = p._formatLink(page) end return ret end

function p.findNamespaceId(link, removeColon) -- Finds the namespace id (namespace number) of a link or a pagename. This -- function will not work if the link is enclosed in double brackets. Colons -- are trimmed from the start of the link by default. To skip colon -- trimming, set the removeColon parameter to true. checkType('findNamespaceId', 1, link, 'string') checkType('findNamespaceId', 2, removeColon, 'boolean', true) if removeColon ~= false then link = removeInitialColon(link) end local namespace = link:match('^(.-):') if namespace then local nsTable = mw.site.namespaces[namespace] if nsTable then return nsTable.id end end return 0 end

local function removeInitialColon(s) -- Removes the initial colon from a string, if present. return s:match('^:?(.*)') end

local function getArgs(frame) -- Fetches the arguments from the parent frame. Whitespace is trimmed and -- blanks are removed. mArguments = require('Module:Arguments') return mArguments.getArgs(frame, {parentOnly = true}) end


-- Helper functions


local p = {}

local libraryUtil = require('libraryUtil') local checkType = libraryUtil.checkType local mArguments -- lazily initialise Module:Arguments local yesno -- lazily initialise Module:Yesno


-- Module:Hatnote -- -- -- -- This module produces hatnote links and links to related articles. It -- -- implements the and meta-templates and includes -- -- helper functions for other Lua hatnote modules. --


References

  1. ^ One source ('The Tourist's companion..') gives a date of 16 January 1823 (Parsons 1835, p. 86), In 'Annals and History of Leeds' records a proposal as early as 1802.[2]
  2. ^ It may have also been that the shareholders were unwilling to commit to building the line until the success or failure of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway was known. (Allen 1974, p. 50), (Tomlinson 1915, p. 99)
  3. ^ An extract from the act on the rates of carriage, as well as a list of subscribers can be found reprinted in "The Tourist's Companion.." (Parsons 1835, pp. 56–60)
  4. ^ The work in Leeds was postponed until February 1831, since there was a possibility that a proposed Leeds & Bradford Railway might be built, giving the possibility of a through link taking a different path. (Tomlinson 1915, p. 205)
  5. ^ a b After 1850 York Junction was called Old Junction, in 1867 in became Milford Old Junction, from 1897 it was called Gascoigne Wood. (Hoole 1986, pp. 32–33)
  6. ^ "The North-eastern Railway (Leeds Extension) Act, 1865" (Cap. 251, 5 July 1865).[45]
  7. ^ "The Leeds New Railway Station Act, 1865" (Cap. 267, 5 July 1865).[46]
  8. ^ The last mine in the coalfield closed in 2004.[63] The site is now a business park and in 2008 was used to store gypsum produced at coal burning power stations as part of the desulphurisation process.[64]
  9. ^ The Department for Transport ended GNER's franchise due to financial problems, including the insolvency of its parent company Sea Containers; see GNER, and Sea Containers
  10. ^ The scheme also included the section of line from Mickefield to Church Fenton on the former York and North Midland track, and the line from Church Fenton to the ECML at Colton junction.[71]
return p

end

', table.concat(classes, ' '), s )
%s
function p._hatnote(s, options) checkType('_hatnote', 1, s, 'string') checkType('_hatnote', 2, options, 'table', true) local classes = {'hatnote'} local extraclasses = options.extraclasses local selfref = options.selfref if type(extraclasses) == 'string' then classes[#classes + 1] = extraclasses end if selfref then classes[#classes + 1] = 'selfref' end return string.format( '

function p.hatnote(frame) local args = getArgs(frame) local s = args[1] local options = {} if not s then return p.makeWikitextError( 'no text specified', 'Template:Hatnote#Errors', args.category ) end options.extraclasses = args.extraclasses options.selfref = args.selfref return p._hatnote(s, options) end


-- Hatnote -- -- Produces standard hatnote text. Implements the template.


function p._formatLink(link, display) -- Find whether we need to use the colon trick or not. We need to use the -- colon trick for categories and files, as otherwise category links -- categorise the page and file links display the file. checkType('_formatLink', 1, link, 'string') checkType('_formatLink', 2, display, 'string', true) link = removeInitialColon(link) local namespace = p.findNamespaceId(link, false) local colon if namespace == 6 or namespace == 14 then colon = ':' else colon = end -- Find whether a faux display value has been added with the | magic -- word. if not display then local prePipe, postPipe = link:match('^(.-)|(.*)$') link = prePipe or link display = postPipe end -- Find the display value. if not display then local page, section = link:match('^(.-)#(.*)$') if page then display = page .. ' § ' .. section end end -- Assemble the link. if display then return string.format('%s', colon, link, display) else return string.format('%s%s', colon, link) end end

function p.formatLink(frame) local args = getArgs(frame) local link = args[1] local display = args[2] if not link then return p.makeWikitextError( 'no link specified', 'Template:Format hatnote link#Errors', args.category ) end return p._formatLink(link, display) end


-- Format link -- -- Makes a wikilink from the given link and display values. Links are escaped -- with colons if necessary, and links to sections are detected and displayed -- with " § " as a separator rather than the standard MediaWiki "#". Used in -- the template.


function p.makeWikitextError(msg, helpLink, addTrackingCategory) -- Formats an error message to be returned to wikitext. If -- addTrackingCategory is not false after being returned from -- Module:Yesno, and if we are not on a talk page, a tracking category -- is added. checkType('makeWikitextError', 1, msg, 'string') checkType('makeWikitextError', 2, helpLink, 'string', true) yesno = require('Module:Yesno') local title = mw.title.getCurrentTitle() -- Make the help link text. local helpText if helpLink then helpText = ' (help)' else helpText = end -- Make the category text. local category if not title.isTalkPage and yesno(addTrackingCategory) ~= false then category = 'Hatnote templates with errors' category = string.format( '%s:%s', mw.site.namespaces[14].name, category ) else category = end return string.format( '%s', msg, helpText, category ) end

function p.formatPageTables(...) -- Takes a list of page/display tables and returns it as a list of -- formatted links. Nil values are not allowed. local pages = {...} local links = {} for i, t in ipairs(pages) do checkType('formatPageTables', i, t, 'table') local link = t[1] local display = t[2] links[i] = p._formatLink(link, display) end return links end

function p.formatPages(...) -- Formats a list of pages using formatLink and returns it as an array. Nil -- values are not allowed. local pages = {...} local ret = {} for i, page in ipairs(pages) do ret[i] = p._formatLink(page) end return ret end

function p.findNamespaceId(link, removeColon) -- Finds the namespace id (namespace number) of a link or a pagename. This -- function will not work if the link is enclosed in double brackets. Colons -- are trimmed from the start of the link by default. To skip colon -- trimming, set the removeColon parameter to true. checkType('findNamespaceId', 1, link, 'string') checkType('findNamespaceId', 2, removeColon, 'boolean', true) if removeColon ~= false then link = removeInitialColon(link) end local namespace = link:match('^(.-):') if namespace then local nsTable = mw.site.namespaces[namespace] if nsTable then return nsTable.id end end return 0 end

local function removeInitialColon(s) -- Removes the initial colon from a string, if present. return s:match('^:?(.*)') end

local function getArgs(frame) -- Fetches the arguments from the parent frame. Whitespace is trimmed and -- blanks are removed. mArguments = require('Module:Arguments') return mArguments.getArgs(frame, {parentOnly = true}) end


-- Helper functions


local p = {}

local libraryUtil = require('libraryUtil') local checkType = libraryUtil.checkType local mArguments -- lazily initialise Module:Arguments local yesno -- lazily initialise Module:Yesno


return p-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- -- Module:Hatnote -- -- -- -- This module produces hatnote links and links to related articles. It -- -- implements the and meta-templates and includes -- -- helper functions for other Lua hatnote modules. --

end

', table.concat(classes, ' '), s )
%s
function p._hatnote(s, options) checkType('_hatnote', 1, s, 'string') checkType('_hatnote', 2, options, 'table', true) local classes = {'hatnote'} local extraclasses = options.extraclasses local selfref = options.selfref if type(extraclasses) == 'string' then classes[#classes + 1] = extraclasses end if selfref then classes[#classes + 1] = 'selfref' end return string.format( '

function p.hatnote(frame) local args = getArgs(frame) local s = args[1] local options = {} if not s then return p.makeWikitextError( 'no text specified', 'Template:Hatnote#Errors', args.category ) end options.extraclasses = args.extraclasses options.selfref = args.selfref return p._hatnote(s, options) end


-- Hatnote -- -- Produces standard hatnote text. Implements the template.


function p._formatLink(link, display) -- Find whether we need to use the colon trick or not. We need to use the -- colon trick for categories and files, as otherwise category links -- categorise the page and file links display the file. checkType('_formatLink', 1, link, 'string') checkType('_formatLink', 2, display, 'string', true) link = removeInitialColon(link) local namespace = p.findNamespaceId(link, false) local colon if namespace == 6 or namespace == 14 then colon = ':' else colon = end -- Find whether a faux display value has been added with the | magic -- word. if not display then local prePipe, postPipe = link:match('^(.-)|(.*)$') link = prePipe or link display = postPipe end -- Find the display value. if not display then local page, section = link:match('^(.-)#(.*)$') if page then display = page .. ' § ' .. section end end -- Assemble the link. if display then return string.format('%s', colon, link, display) else return string.format('%s%s', colon, link) end end

function p.formatLink(frame) local args = getArgs(frame) local link = args[1] local display = args[2] if not link then return p.makeWikitextError( 'no link specified', 'Template:Format hatnote link#Errors', args.category ) end return p._formatLink(link, display) end


-- Format link -- -- Makes a wikilink from the given link and display values. Links are escaped -- with colons if necessary, and links to sections are detected and displayed -- with " § " as a separator rather than the standard MediaWiki "#". Used in -- the template.


function p.makeWikitextError(msg, helpLink, addTrackingCategory) -- Formats an error message to be returned to wikitext. If -- addTrackingCategory is not false after being returned from -- Module:Yesno, and if we are not on a talk page, a tracking category -- is added. checkType('makeWikitextError', 1, msg, 'string') checkType('makeWikitextError', 2, helpLink, 'string', true) yesno = require('Module:Yesno') local title = mw.title.getCurrentTitle() -- Make the help link text. local helpText if helpLink then helpText = ' (help)' else helpText = end -- Make the category text. local category if not title.isTalkPage and yesno(addTrackingCategory) ~= false then category = 'Hatnote templates with errors' category = string.format( '%s:%s', mw.site.namespaces[14].name, category ) else category = end return string.format( '%s', msg, helpText, category ) end

function p.formatPageTables(...) -- Takes a list of page/display tables and returns it as a list of -- formatted links. Nil values are not allowed. local pages = {...} local links = {} for i, t in ipairs(pages) do checkType('formatPageTables', i, t, 'table') local link = t[1] local display = t[2] links[i] = p._formatLink(link, display) end return links end

function p.formatPages(...) -- Formats a list of pages using formatLink and returns it as an array. Nil -- values are not allowed. local pages = {...} local ret = {} for i, page in ipairs(pages) do ret[i] = p._formatLink(page) end return ret end

function p.findNamespaceId(link, removeColon) -- Finds the namespace id (namespace number) of a link or a pagename. This -- function will not work if the link is enclosed in double brackets. Colons -- are trimmed from the start of the link by default. To skip colon -- trimming, set the removeColon parameter to true. checkType('findNamespaceId', 1, link, 'string') checkType('findNamespaceId', 2, removeColon, 'boolean', true) if removeColon ~= false then link = removeInitialColon(link) end local namespace = link:match('^(.-):') if namespace then local nsTable = mw.site.namespaces[namespace] if nsTable then return nsTable.id end end return 0 end

local function removeInitialColon(s) -- Removes the initial colon from a string, if present. return s:match('^:?(.*)') end

local function getArgs(frame) -- Fetches the arguments from the parent frame. Whitespace is trimmed and -- blanks are removed. mArguments = require('Module:Arguments') return mArguments.getArgs(frame, {parentOnly = true}) end


-- Helper functions


local p = {}

local libraryUtil = require('libraryUtil') local checkType = libraryUtil.checkType local mArguments -- lazily initialise Module:Arguments local yesno -- lazily initialise Module:Yesno


-- Module:Hatnote -- -- -- -- This module produces hatnote links and links to related articles. It -- -- implements the and meta-templates and includes -- -- helper functions for other Lua hatnote modules. --


Notes

  • Neville Hill depot, rolling stock and locomotive depot on the line near Osmondthorpe, Leeds

See also

In eighteen hundred and forty three,
I broke my shovel across me knee;
I went to work for the company,
on the Leeds and Selby Railway.
, this railway is mentioned in the verse for 1843: The PoguesIn the song "Poor Paddy" by

Popular culture

In 2009 the Network Rail route utilisation strategy electrification paper identified the North Cross-Pennine route including the Leeds-Selby-Hull Line as a high ranking option for future electrification, in terms of benefits to passenger services.[69] In 2011 funding for the electrification in CP5 (see Network Rail Control Periods) of the section from Leeds to Micklefield was announced.[70][note 10] Funding for the section of the line from Micklefield to Selby was added to the electrification schedule in 2013.[72]

In 2005, as part of its franchise offer, the train operating Great North Eastern Railway (GNER) proposed to electrify the section of the line between Leeds and Hambleton junction in association with Network Rail, at an estimated cost of £70 million.[67][68] GNER lost the franchise in December 2006 before undertaking the electrification work.[note 9]

The line from Leeds Central station to Neville Hill depot was electrified in the early 1990s as a corollary to the East Coast Main Line electrification project.[65] The electrification was energised in March 1993.[66]

Electrification

The Selby diversion of the East Coast Main Line opened in1983, passing under the Leeds-Selby Line between South Milford and Selby; junctions were made between the two lines allowing running from York onto the Leeds-Selby eastwards, and from the south onto the line travelling westwards to Leeds.

The land north of Gascoigne Wood station was used as a marshalling yard until 1959.[57] The site was later used in the 1970s[60] as the point at which coal from the collieries of the Selby Coalfield was brought to the surface.[61][62] [note 8]

Hambleton station closed in 1959 and Osmondthorpe station in 1960.[51] East Garforth railway station opened in 1987.

Many of the connecting lines closed in the 1950s and 60s: passenger services on the Castleford to Garforth Line from the junction at Garforth station closed in 1951, and freight ended in 1969,[59] the Cawood, Wistow and Selby Light Railway in 1960, the Selby to Goole Line in 1964, and Leeds to Wetherby Line from Cross Gates station also in 1964.[54]

East Garforth station in 2006

BR and post-privatisation period (1948–)

In 1930 a station at Osmondthorpe opened.[51]

LNER period (1923–1948)

  • Serial
  • [[Procedural drama|P#REDIRECT) The plan was submitted to parliament in 1864 and received assent in 1865.[43][note 6] The new joint station received assent in the same session.[43][note 7] In 1869 the Leeds extension was completed; a 1-mile length of line which connected Marsh Lane through central Leeds to Holbeck; the line was elevated, running over the streets on bridges and viaducts and embankments.[47] A new station, called Leeds New railway station was constructed for this connecting line, adjacent to and south of Wellington Street station.[48] The line representing a saving of around 35 miles journey for trains travelling from west of Leeds to Hull or York.[49] A new goods station was built at the Marsh Lane station site, and in 1893 this was enlarged, and the extra lines added between Marsh Lane and Neville Hill,[50] the Richmond Hill tunnel was opened out at the same time, and made into a cutting, so that the extra tracks could be accommodated.[51] In 1869 a connecting line running northeast from Micklefield station on the Leeds and Selby to Church Fenton station on the former York and North Midland line was opened, shortening the route between Leeds and York and avoiding a reversal at York Junction;[52] the line came into use on the opening of the Leeds extension.[53] In 1876 the Leeds to Wetherby Line was opened; this ran from a junction just east of Cross Gates on the Leeds and Selby Line northward to Wetherby.[54][55] An act for the construction of the Garforth to Castleford Line was passed in 1873 and the line opened in 1878, it left the Leeds and Selby Line east of Garforth station. The NER owned over three quarters of the shares in the line.[56] In 1898 the Cawood, Wistow and Selby Light Railway was opened. This connected to the Leeds and Selby Line about 1 mile west of Selby at Brayton Gates junction. In 1902 Gascoigne Wood station (formerly York Junction station[note 5]) closed.[57] In 1910 the Selby to Goole Line was opened, which had a junction with the Leeds and Selby line at Thorpe Gates junction, west of Selby. A halt station Ridge Bridge opened c. 1912 near to the crossing of the Roman Ridge road (now the A656.); the station closed to general passengers after 1914, but remained in use as a workmans halt for the Ridge Bridge Colliery into the 1920s.[58]

|group4 = Format |list4 =

|group3 = List by country |list3 =

|group2 = Genres |list2 =

|group1 = By location |list1 =

In the 1860s the North Eastern Railway (NER) sought to extend the line from its Marsh Lane terminus into the centre of Leeds. Concurrently the NER and the London and North Western Railway planned to construct a joint station in Leeds.[43] An initial (1863) plan for the line into Leeds met with significant local opposition and was withdrawn, and a revised route was made.[44] (See also {{Navbox |name = Television drama series |title = Television drama series |state = autocollapse |listclass = hlist

NER period (1854–1923)

In 1844 an act of Parliament was passed allowing the York and North Midland to absorb the Leeds and Selby Railway entirely, and so the Leeds and Selby Railway as an independent entity ceased to exist.[42] A decade later, the York and North Midland Railway would become the North Eastern Railway after its amalgamation with other railway companies.

Hudson's first act was to close the line to passengers west of Milford; despite his line being 4 miles longer passengers now had no choice but to use it. In 1848 the line west of Milford was closed to freight as well; Marsh Lane station was at that time still a terminus, and so useless for through traffic to Manchester and beyond. Passenger services were reinstated in 1850, but freight continued to run to Leeds via Castleford and not Marsh Lane.[38]

[41][38] The Leeds and Selby Railway offered a direct route into Leeds from the east.

Lease and acquisition by the York and North Midland (1840–1854)

History, 1840–present

The Aberford railway was a private railway built during the same period as the Leeds and Selby Railway by the Gascoigne family. It ran from Aberford and connected at Garforth. It was built primarily to carry coal from the Gascoigne's coal mines but also carried passengers. It closed in 1924.

Aberford Railway

The original Leeds to Hull plan was completed in 1840 with the construction of a line running almost directly east from Selby to Hull. A bascule bridge was constructed across the Ouse at Selby, just north of the jetties at the rear of the original Selby station. A new station to the west was constructed, and the old station became a goods shed.[39][40]

Hull and Selby Railway

East of the junction was a station called York Junction.[38][note 5]

[38]

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