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List of 2009 Indian Premier League personnel changes

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List of 2009 Indian Premier League personnel changes

This is a list of all personnel changes for the 2009 Indian Premier League.

Retirement

Date Name Team(s) played (years) Age Notes Ref.
15 November 2008 Shaun Pollock Mumbai Indians (2008) 35 Became the bowling coach for the Mumbai Indians.[1] [2]
2008 Darren Lehmann Rajasthan Royals (2008) 38 Became coach for the Deccan Chargers. [3]
2008 Stephen Fleming Chennai Super Kings (2008) 35 Became coach for the Chennai Super Kings.

Trades

Teams were reluctant to trade initially due to the troubled economic times and the general desire to concentrate on building a well-rounded team as opposed to making profits out of trades.[4]

17 January 2009 To Delhi Daredevils
To Mumbai Indians
[5]
22 January 2009 To Mumbai Indians
To Royal Challengers Bangalore
[6]
Three-team trade [4]
To Mumbai Indians
To Royal Challengers Bangalore

Signings

Delhi Daredevils scouts prompted management to sign David Warner early in the off-season

With most international players (barring members of the England squad and Indian Cricket League players) signing up for the first season on multi-season contracts, the emphasis for off-season signings for 2009 were possible up-and-coming young players from international domestic circuits. Some teams, including the Delhi Daredevils sent scouts to domestic and 'emerging player' matches held in Australia to sign up players.[7]

Pre-auction signings

Post-auction signings
Any 'unsold' players as well as players sought after as replacements for Pakistani players who would be unable to play for their IPL team in 2009 can be signed on after the auction. These include:

Re-signings

IPL Replacement Players, filling in for players away on national duty, and some under-19 players, were recruited with a one-year contract and hence their franchises had the choice to resign them or release them as free agents.

Withdrawals

Other players opted to withdraw from this particular season from the IPL, but have not ruled out returning in the future. In most cases, the reason for withdrawal was that the players wanted a break from the hectic international schedule. There have also been withdrawals due to injury and also Pakistanis who have had their contracts terminated or suspended due to tensions between India and Pakistan since the Mumbai Terrorist Attacks. Most withdrawals were Australian international players, for whom the IPL would be the only break between a series against Pakistan and the upcoming long tour of England which would include The Ashes series. Withdrawals included:

Auction

Kevin Pietersen was signed for a record 1.55 million USD by Bangalore Royal Challengers and made captain of the team

The 2009 Indian Premier League Players Auction was held on 6 February 2009 in Goa, India. A total of 43 players from 9 countries were shortlisted for the auction.[8] However, only 17 of them were sold.[9] The English duo of Kevin Pietersen and Andrew Flintoff each went for US$ 1.55 million, which made them the highest-paid cricketers in the IPL.[10][11][12][13][14][15][16]

Sold players

Nat Player Team Winning bid Base price
Shaun Tait Delhi Daredevils $ 375,000 $ 250,000
JP Duminy Kolkata Knight Riders $ 950,000 $ 300,000
Andrew Flintoff Mumbai Indians $ 1,550,000 $ 950,000
Kevin Pietersen Chennai Super Kings $ 1,550,000 $ 1,350,000
Fidel Edwards Royal Challengers Bangalore $ 150,000 $ 150,000
Owais Shah Kings XI Punjab $ 275,000 $ 150,000
Paul Collingwood Sunrisers Hyderabad $ 275,000 $ 250,000
Tyron Henderson Kolkata Knight Riders $ 650,000 $ 100,000
Ravi Bopara Rajasthan Royals $ 450,000 $ 150,000
Thilan Thushara Royal Challengers Bangalore $ 140,000 $ 100,000
Jesse Ryder Chennai Super Kings $ 160,000 $ 100,000
Kyle Mills Sunrisers Hyderabad $ 150,000 $ 150,000
Dwayne Smith Kolkata Knight Riders $ 100,000 $ 100,000
Jerome Taylor Delhi Daredevils $ 150,000 $ 150,000
Mohammad Ashraful Kings XI Punjab $ 75,000 $ 75,000
Mashrafe Mortaza Royal Challengers Bangalore $ 600,000 $ 50,000
George Bailey Kolkata Knight Riders $ 50,000 $ 50,000

Source:[17][18]

Unsold players

References

  1. ^ "Pollock joins Mumbai Indians in new role". CricInfo (ESPN). 2009-03-17. Retrieved 2012-05-09. 
  2. ^ "Pollock not to return to Mumbai Indians". CricInfo (ESPN). 2008-11-15. Retrieved 2012-05-09. 
  3. ^ "Gilchrist to lead Deccan Chargers". CricInfo (ESPN). 2008-09-29. Retrieved 2012-05-09. 
  4. ^ a b "7 players transferred in IPL trades". Chennai, India:  
  5. ^ "IPL: Delhi trade Dhawan for Nehra". CricBuzz. 2009-01-17. Retrieved 2012-05-09. 
  6. ^ "Mumbai Indians swap Uthappa for Zaheer". The Indian Express. 2009-01-22. Retrieved 2012-05-09. 
  7. ^ "Players unsold at auction available as replacements". Cricinfo. 27 January 2009. Archived from the original on 8 March 2009. Retrieved 2009-03-11. 
  8. ^ Pietersen and Flintoff head England's magfnificent seven for IPL auction, Daily Mail
  9. ^ IPL auction 2009: List of players sold, ESPN Cricinfo
  10. ^ Flintoff and Pietersen most expensive buys, ESPN Cricinfo
  11. ^ Sports: England players top IPL auction, BBC News
  12. ^ Kevin Pietersen and Andrew Flintoff to earn footballer wages after IPL auction, Daily Mirror
  13. ^ England's Kevin Pietersen and Andrew Flintoff sold for $1.55m each at IPL auction, The Telegraph
  14. ^ IPL auction: Pietersen and Flintoff fetch record prices, The Hindu
  15. ^ Flintoff, Pietersen cash in at IPL auction, smh.com.au
  16. ^ The Expensive and the Unsold: Highlights of the IPL Auction, Cricket360
  17. ^ IPL auction 2009: List of players sold, ESPN Cricinfo
  18. ^ IPL 2009 auction: The complete lowdown, sify.com
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