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List of Mongol rulers

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List of Mongol rulers

8 of 15 Khagans of the Mongol Empire.
Mongol Empire and its fragmentation
Imperial Seal of Güyük Khan
Imperial Seal of Bogd Khan

This is a list of Mongol rulers. The list of states is chronological but follows the development of different dynasties.

Contents

  • Khamag Mongol (1120s–1206) 1
  • Mongol Empire (1206–1368) 2
    • Great Khans and Yuan dynasty 2.1
    • Golden Horde 2.2
      • Left wing (White Horde) 2.2.1
      • Right wing (Blue Horde) 2.2.2
      • Great Horde (1466–1502) 2.2.3
    • Ilkhanate 2.3
      • Chobanids (1335–1357) 2.3.1
      • Jalayirid Sultanate (1335–1432) 2.3.2
      • Injuids (1335–1357) 2.3.3
      • Arghun Dynasty (1479?–1599?) 2.3.4
    • Chagatai Khanate 2.4
      • Moghulistan (Eastern Chagatai Khanate) 2.4.1
      • Kara Del (1383–1513) 2.4.2
  • Al-Adil Kitbugha-Sultan of Mamluk Sultanate (1294–1296) 3
  • Northern Yuan dynasty (1368–1635) 4
  • Genghisid Setsen Khans of Eastern Mongolia (1627–1922) 5
  • Oirats 6
    • Four Oirat (1399–1634) 6.1
    • Dzungar Khanate 6.2
    • Khans of Khoshut Khanate 6.3
    • Khotgoid Khanate (late 16th century – late 17th century) 6.4
    • Torghud khans of Kalmyk Khanate 6.5
  • Bogd Khaanate 7
  • References 8
    • Citations 8.1
    • Sources 8.2
  • See also 9

Khamag Mongol (1120s–1206)

Mongol Empire (1206–1368)

Great Khans and Yuan dynasty

With the establishment of the Yuan dynasty in 1271, the Kublaids became Yuan emperors, who were considered as Khagan for the Mongols and Huangdi (Chinese emperor) for native Chinese.

  • Genghis Khan (1206–1227)
  • Tolui Khan (as Regent) (1227–1229)
  • Ögedei Khan (1229–1241)
  • Töregene Khatun (as Regent) (1243–1246)
  • Güyük Khan (1246–1248)
  • Oghul Qaimish (as Regent) (1248–1251)
  • Möngke Khan (1251–1259)
  • Ariq Böke (1259–1264)
  • Kublai Khan (1260–1294) - Khagan title: Setsen; Temple name: Shizu (1271–1294) Era name: Zhiyuan (至元) (1264–1294)
  • Temür Khan - Khagan title: Öljeitu; Temple name: Chengzong - (1294–1307); Era names: Yuanzhen (元貞) (1295–1297); Dade (大德) (1297–1307)
  • Külüg Khan - Khagan title: Khülük; Temple name: Wuzong - (1308–1311); Era name: Zhida (至大) (1308–1311)
  • Ayurbarwada Buyantu Khan - Temple name: Renzong - (1311–1320); Era names: Huangqing (皇慶) (1312–1313); Yanyou (延祐) (1314–1320)
  • Gegeen Khan - Khagan title: Gegeen; Temple name: Yingzong - (1321–1323); Era name: Zhizhi (至治) (1321–1323)
  • Yesün-Temür - Temple name: Taiding Di - (1323–1328); Era names: Taiding (泰定) (1321–1328); Zhihe (致和) 1328
  • Ragibagh Khan - Temple name: Tianshun Di; Era name: Tianshun (天順) (1328)
  • Jayaatu Khan Tugh Temür - Khagan title: Jayaaatu; Temple name: Wenzong - (1328–1329 / 1329–1332); Era names: Tianli (天歷) (1328–1330); Zhishun (至順) (1330–1332)
  • Khutughtu Khan Kusala - Khagan title: Khutughtu; Temple name: Mingzong; Era name: Tianli (天歷) (1329)
  • Rinchinbal Khan - Temple name: Ningzong; Era name: Zhishun (至順) (1332)
  • Toghon Temür - Khagan title: Ukhaantu; Temple name: Huizong ; Shundi - (1333–1370); Era names: Zhishun (至順) (1333); Yuantong (元統) (1333–1335); Zhiyuan (至元) (1335–1340); Zhizheng (至正) (1341–1368); Zhiyuan (至元) 1368–1370

Golden Horde

Left wing (White Horde)

This Horde was annexed by Abu'l-Khayr Khan of the Shaybanids in 1446.

Right wing (Blue Horde)

Actual rulers of the Golden Horde (Jochid Ulus, Kipchak Khanate) were members of the House of Batu until 1361.

Great Horde (1466–1502)

Ilkhanate

After the murder of Arpa, the regional states established during the disintegration of the Ilkhanate raised their own candidates as claimants.

Claimants from eastern Persia (Khurasan):

  • Togha Temür (c. 1338–1353) (recognized by the Kartids 1338–1349; by the Jalayirids 1338–1339, 1340–1344; by the Sarbadars 1338–1341, 1344, 1353)
  • Luqman (1353–1388) (son of Togha Temür)

Chobanids (1335–1357)

Jalayirid Sultanate (1335–1432)

Injuids (1335–1357)

Arghun Dynasty (1479?–1599?)

Chagatai Khanate

The Chagatai Khanate is split into two parts, western and eastern.

Moghulistan (Eastern Chagatai Khanate)

From 1370 on, the Chagatai Khans were puppets of Timur.

Kara Del (1383–1513)

Al-Adil Kitbugha-Sultan of Mamluk Sultanate (1294–1296)

Northern Yuan dynasty (1368–1635)

Khans or Khagans of the Mongolia-based Northern Yuan dynasty:

Genghisid Setsen Khans of Eastern Mongolia (1627–1922)

Ancestry of Navaanneren (previous Setsen Khans):

  • - Batmunkh Dayan Khaan /1464–1543/, 29th Great Khan and descendant of Genghis Khan (1162–1227) through Kubilai Khan.
  • - Gersenz Jalair Khuntaij /1513–1549/, youngest son of Dayan Khan through Queen Samar Ghailu (also called Jimsgene Khatan).
  • - Amindural /1550/, fourth son of Gersenz, ruled northern Kerulen river area.
  • - Morbuim Taij, son of Amindural.
  • - Khar Zagal /until 1627/, son of Morbuim, ruled until 1627.
  • 1. Sholoi /1627–1652/, son of Morbuim, succeeded his brother Khar Zagal in 1627. First with the title of Setsen Khan.
  • 2. Babu /1652–1683/, fifth son of Sholoi.
  • 3. Norov /1683–1701/, third son of Babu.
  • 4. Ravdan /1688/
  • 5. Omokhei /Sonomdorj/ /1701–1709/, was only 10 years old in 1701, so was brought up under the tutelage of Namjil Erdene Taij, a grandson of Sholoi.
  • 6. Gunchin /1709–1728/, eldest son of Omokhei.
  • 7. Tsevdenbainjuur /1728–1733/, eldest son of Gunchin.
  • 8. Choijav /1733–1735/, grandson of Norov.
  • 9. Damiran/1735–1751/, second son of Gunchin.
  • 10. Manibadar /1751–1767/, eldest son of Damiran.
  • 11. Tsevdenjav /1767–1788/, second son of Damiran.
  • 12. Tseveendorj /1788–1795/, eldest son of Tsevdenjav.
  • 13. Puntsagdorj /1795/, only son of Tseveendorj.
  • 14. Sanzaidorj /1796–1800/, second generation grandson of Choijav.
  • 15. Mahashiri /1800–1807/, paternal uncle of Puntsagdorj.
  • 16. Enkhtor /1807–1816/, son of Mahashiri.
  • 17. Artased/1817–1874/, son of Enkhtor.
  • 18. Tserendorj /1874–1893/, son of Artased.
  • 19. Demchigdorj /1893–1909/, eldest son of Tserendorj.
  • 20. Navaanneren /1910–1922/, eldest son of Tserendondov, who was the son of Orjinjav the son of Artased.

Oirats

Four Oirat (1399–1634)

  • Ugetchi Khashikha (c. 1399)
  • Batula (Bahamu, Mahamud) (1399–1408)
  • Togoon (Toghan) (1408–1438)
  • Esen (1438–1454)
  • Amasanj (1454–1455)
  • Ush-Temür (Ish-Temür) (1455–1469)
  • Khishig
  • Arkhan

Dzungar Khanate

Khans of Khoshut Khanate

  • Güshi Khan Toro-Baikhu (1642–1655)
  • Dayan Ochir Khan (1655–1669)
  • Gonchug Dalai Khan (1669–1698)
  • Lhazang Chingis Khan (1698–1717)

Khotgoid Khanate (late 16th century – late 17th century)

Kalmyk Khanate

  • Kho Orluk (d. 1644)
  • Shukhur Daiching (1644–1661)
  • Puntsuk (1661–1669)
  • Ayuka Khan (1669–1724)
  • Tseren Donduk Khan (1724–1735)
  • Donduk Ombo Khan (1735–1741)
  • Donduk Dashi Khan (1741–1761)
  • Ubashi Khan (1762–1771)

Bogd Khaanate

  • Bogd Khan (r. 1911–19, 1921-24) - Era name: Olnoo Örgögdsön[2] (1911–1924); (the 8th Jebtsundamba Khutuktu) - Tibetan Spiritual head of Mongolian's Geluk Sect.

References

Citations

  1. ^ Weiers 1986: 505
  2. ^ Alan J.K Sanders, Historical Dictionary of Mongolia: Second Edition, (2003), Scarecrow Press, Inc. p.413. ISBN 0810866013

Sources

  • Dughlát Muhammad Haidar, Norbert Elias, Edward Denison Ross - The Tarikh-i-rashidi
  • Henry Hoyle Howorth-History of the Mongols
  • Herbert Franke, Denis Twitchett, John King Fairbank -The Cambridge History of China: Alien regimes and border states, 907-1368
  • William Bayne Fisher, Peter Jackson, Laurence Lockhart, J. A. Boyle -The Cambridge history of Iran, 5
  • Konstantin Nikolaevich Maksimov - Kalmykia in Russia's past and present national policies and administrative system

See also

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