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List of Prime Ministers of Queen Elizabeth II

Queen Elizabeth II with several of her Prime Ministers and other Commonwealth nation leaders at the 1960 Commonwealth Prime Ministers' Conference

Since succeeding her father on 6 February 1952, Queen Elizabeth II has been head of state of 32 different Commonwealth realms; currently, there are 16 realms. With the Westminster system of government being a legacy of former British colonial possession, in each realm, the Queen's government is headed by a prime minister; appointment and dismissal of prime ministers are common reserve powers that can be exercised by the Queen or her governors-general.

Elizabeth has had 12 Queen Victoria. She has also had 14 New Zealand prime ministers, 14 Australian prime ministers, and 11 Canadian prime ministers.

This list does not cover Commonwealth nations that are not Commonwealth realms, nor holders of offices of prime minister in colonies or sub-national entities. Prime ministers of nations that have ceased to be Commonwealth realms during the Queen's reign are listed in the second section.

Contents

  • Prime Ministers of current realms 1
    • Antigua and Barbuda 1.1
    • Australia 1.2
    • The Bahamas 1.3
    • Barbados 1.4
    • Belize 1.5
    • Canada 1.6
    • Grenada 1.7
    • Jamaica 1.8
    • New Zealand 1.9
    • Papua New Guinea 1.10
    • Saint Kitts and Nevis 1.11
    • Saint Lucia 1.12
    • Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 1.13
    • Solomon Islands 1.14
    • Tuvalu 1.15
    • United Kingdom 1.16
  • Prime ministers of former realms 2
    • Ceylon (now Sri Lanka) 2.1
    • Fiji 2.2
    • The Gambia 2.3
    • Ghana 2.4
    • Guyana 2.5
    • Kenya 2.6
    • Malawi 2.7
    • Malta 2.8
    • Mauritius 2.9
    • Nigeria 2.10
    • Pakistan 2.11
    • Sierra Leone 2.12
    • South Africa 2.13
    • Tanganyika (now Tanzania) 2.14
    • Trinidad and Tobago 2.15
    • Uganda 2.16
  • See also 3
  • References 4
  • Notes 5

Prime Ministers of current realms

Antigua and Barbuda

Antigua and Barbuda

became an independent Commonwealth realm on 1 November 1981 with Vere Bird as the first Prime Minister. Bird had previously been Premier of Antigua.

Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Tenure
Took office Left office
1 Vere Bird
(1910–1999)
1 November 1981 9 March 1994
2 Lester Bird
(1938–)
9 March 1994 24 March 2004
3 Baldwin Spencer
(1948–)
24 March 2004 13 June 2014
4 Gaston Browne
(1967–)
13 June 2014 Incumbent

Reference[1]

Australia

Elizabeth and Robert Menzies at a formal evening event
Queen Elizabeth II with Prime Minister of Australia Robert Menzies during her first tour of Australia in 1954.

Robert Menzies

was the incumbent Prime Minister of Australia when Elizabeth became queen.

Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Tenure
Took office Left office
1 Sir Robert Menzies
(1894–1978)
19 December 1949 26 January 1966
2 Harold Holt
(1908–1967)
26 January 1966 19 December 1967
3 John McEwen
(1900–1980)
19 December 1967 10 January 1968
4 John Gorton
(1911–2002)
10 January 1968 10 March 1971
5 William McMahon
(1908–1988)
10 March 1971 5 December 1972
6 Gough Whitlam
(1916–2014)
5 December 1972 11 November 1975
7 Malcolm Fraser
(1930–2015)
11 November 1975 11 March 1983
8 Bob Hawke
(1929–)
11 March 1983 20 December 1991
9 Paul Keating
(1944–)
20 December 1991 11 March 1996
10 John Howard
(1939–)
11 March 1996 3 December 2007
11 Kevin Rudd
(1957–)
3 December 2007 24 June 2010
12 Julia Gillard
(1961–)
24 June 2010 27 June 2013
(11) Kevin Rudd
(1957–)
27 June 2013 18 September 2013
13 Tony Abbott
(1957–)
18 September 2013 15 September 2015
14 Malcolm Turnbull
(1954–)
15 September 2015 Incumbent

Reference[2]

The Bahamas

The Bahamas

became an independent Commonwealth realm on 10 July 1973 with Lynden Pindling as the first Prime Minister. Pindling had previously been the self-governing Prime Minister of the Commonwealth of the Bahama Islands.

Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Tenure
Took office Left office
1 Sir Lynden Pindling
(1930–2000)
10 July 1973 21 August 1992
2 Hubert Ingraham
(1947–)
21 August 1992 3 May 2002
3 Perry Christie
(1947–)
3 May 2002 4 May 2007
(2) Hubert Ingraham
(1947–)
4 May 2007 8 May 2012
(3) Perry Christie
(1947–)
8 May 2012 Incumbent

Reference[3]

Barbados

Barbados

became an independent Commonwealth realm on 30 November 1966 with Errol Barrow as the first Prime Minister. Barrow had previously been Premier of Barbados.

Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Tenure
Took office Left office
1 Errol Barrow
(1920–1987)
30 November 1966 8 September 1976
2 J.M.G.M. 'Tom' Adams
(1931–1985)
8 September 1976 11 March 1985
3 Harold Bernard St. John
(1931–2004)
11 March 1985 29 May 1986
(1) Errol Barrow
(1920–1987)
29 May 1986 1 June 1987
4 Lloyd Erskine Sandiford
(1937–)
1 June 1987 7 September 1994
5 Owen Arthur
(1945–)
7 September 1994 16 January 2008
6 David Thompson
(1961–2010)
16 January 2008 23 October 2010
7 Freundel Stuart
(1951–)
23 October 2010 Incumbent

Reference[4]

Belize

Belize

became an independent Commonwealth realm on 21 September 1981 with Prime Minister. Price had previously been Premier of Belize.

Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Tenure
Took office Left office
1 George Cadle Price
(1919–2011)
21 September 1981 17 December 1984
2 Manuel Esquivel
(1940–)
17 December 1984 7 November 1989
(1) George Cadle Price
(1919–2011)
7 November 1989 3 July 1993
(2) Manuel Esquivel
(1940–)
3 July 1993 28 August 1998
3 Said Musa
(1944–)
28 August 1998 8 February 2008
4 Dean Barrow
(1951–)
8 February 2008 Incumbent

Reference[5]

Canada

Louis St. Laurent

was the incumbent Prime Minister of Canada when Elizabeth became queen.

Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Tenure
Took office Left office
1 Louis St. Laurent
(1882–1973)
15 November 1948 21 June 1957
2 John Diefenbaker
(1895–1979)
21 June 1957 22 April 1963
3 Lester B. Pearson
(1897–1972)
22 April 1963 20 April 1968
4 Pierre Trudeau
(1919–2000)
20 April 1968 4 June 1979
5 Joe Clark
(1939–)
4 June 1979 3 March 1980
(4) Pierre Trudeau
(1919–2000)
3 March 1980 30 June 1984
6 John Turner
(1929–)
30 June 1984 17 September 1984
7 Brian Mulroney
(1939–)
17 September 1984 25 June 1993
8 Kim Campbell
(1947–)
25 June 1993 4 November 1993
9 Jean Chrétien
(1934–)
4 November 1993 12 December 2003
10 Paul Martin
(1938–)
12 December 2003 6 February 2006
11 Stephen Harper
(1959–)
6 February 2006 Incumbent
12 Justin Trudeau
(1971–)
4 November 2015 Designate

Reference[6]

Grenada

Grenada

became an independent Commonwealth realm on 7 February 1974 with Eric Gairy as the first Prime Minister. Gairy had previously been Premier of Grenada.

Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Tenure
Took office Left office
1 Sir Eric Gairy
(1922–1997)
7 February 1974 13 March 1979
2 Maurice Bishop
(1943–1983)
13 March 1979 19 October 1983
3 Herbert Blaize
(1918–1999)
4 December 1984 19 December 1989
4 Ben Jones
(1924–2005)
19 December 1989 16 March 1990
5 Nicholas Brathwaite
(1925–)
16 March 1990 1 February 1995
6 George Brizan
(1942–2012)
1 February 1995 22 June 1995
7 Keith Mitchell
(1946–)
22 June 1995 9 July 2008
8 Tillman Thomas
(1947–)
9 July 2008 20 February 2013
(7) Keith Mitchell
(1946–)
20 February 2013 Incumbent

Reference[7]

Jamaica

Jamaica

became an independent Commonwealth realm on 6 August 1962 with Alexander Bustamante as the first Prime Minister. Bustamante had previously been Premier of Jamaica.

Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Tenure
Took office Left office
1 Sir Alexander Bustamante
(1884–1977)
6 August 1962 23 February 1967
2 Sir Donald Sangster
(1911–1967)
23 February 1967 11 April 1967
3 Hugh Shearer
(1923–2004)
11 April 1967 2 March 1972
4 Michael Manley
(1924–1997)
2 March 1972 1 November 1980
5 Edward Seaga
(1930–)
1 November 1980 10 February 1989
(4) Michael Manley
(1924–1997)
10 February 1989 30 March 1992
6 P. J. Patterson
(1935–)
30 March 1992 30 March 2006
7 Portia Simpson-Miller
(1945–)
30 March 2006 11 September 2007
8 Bruce Golding
(1947–)
11 September 2007 23 October 2011
9 Andrew Holness
(1972–)
23 October 2011 5 January 2012
(7) Portia Simpson-Miller
(1945–)
5 January 2012 Incumbent

Reference[8]

New Zealand

Sidney Holland

was the incumbent Prime Minister of New Zealand when Elizabeth became Queen.

Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Tenure
Took office Left office
1 Sidney Holland
(1893–1961)
13 December 1949 20 September 1957
2 Keith Holyoake
(1904–1983)
20 September 1957 12 December 1957
3 Walter Nash
(1882–1968)
12 December 1957 12 December 1960
(2) Sir Keith Holyoake
(1904–1983)
12 December 1960 7 February 1972
4 Jack Marshall
(1912–1988)
7 February 1972 8 December 1972
5 Norman Kirk
(1923–1974)
8 December 1972 31 August 1974
6 Bill Rowling
(1927–1995)
6 September 1974 12 December 1975
7 Sir Robert Muldoon
(1921–1992)
12 December 1975 26 July 1984
8 David Lange
(1942–2005)
26 July 1984 8 August 1989
9 Geoffrey Palmer
(1942–)
8 August 1989 4 September 1990
10 Mike Moore
(1949–)
4 September 1990 2 November 1990
11 Jim Bolger
(1935–)
2 November 1990 8 December 1997
12 Jenny Shipley
(1952–)
8 December 1997 5 December 1999
13 Helen Clark
(1950–)
5 December 1999 19 November 2008
14 John Key
(1961–)
19 November 2008 Incumbent

Reference[9]

Papua New Guinea

Papua New Guinea

became an independent Commonwealth realm on 16 September 1975 with Michael Somare as the first Prime Minister. Somare had previously been Chief Minister of the Papua New Guinea.

Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Tenure
Took office Left office
1 Michael Somare
(1936–)
16 September 1975 11 March 1980
2 Sir Julius Chan
(1939–)
11 March 1980 2 August 1982
(1) Michael Somare
(1936–)
2 August 1982 21 November 1985
3 Paias Wingti
(1951–)
21 November 1985 4 July 1988
4 Rabbie Namaliu
(1947–)
4 July 1988 17 July 1992
(3) Paias Wingti
(1951–)
17 July 1992 30 August 1994
(2) Sir Julius Chan
(1939–)
30 August 1994 27 March 1997
N/A John Giheno
(1950–)
Acting Prime Minister
27 March 1997 2 June 1997
(2) Sir Julius Chan
(1939–)
2 June 1997 22 July 1997
5 Bill Skate
(1953–2006)
22 July 1997 14 July 1999
6 Sir Mekere Morauta
(1946–)
14 July 1999 5 August 2002
(1) Sir Michael Somare
(1936–)
5 August 2002 2 August 2011
7 Peter O'Neill
(1965–)
2 August 2011 Incumbent

Reference[10]

Saint Kitts and Nevis

Saint Kitts and Nevis

became an independent Commonwealth realm on 19 September 1983 with Kennedy Simmonds as the first Prime Minister. Simmonds had previously been Premier of Saint Kitts and Nevis.

Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Tenure
Took office Left office
1 Kennedy Simmonds
(1936–)
19 September 1983 7 July 1995
2 Denzil Douglas
(1953–)
7 July 1995 18 February 2015
3 Timothy Harris
(1964–)
18 February 2015 Incumbent

Reference[11]

Saint Lucia

Saint Lucia

became an independent Commonwealth realm on 22 February 1979 with John Compton as the first Prime Minister. Compton had previously been Premier of Saint Lucia.

Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Tenure
Took office Left office
1 John Compton
(1925–2007)
22 February 1979 2 July 1979
2 Allan Louisy
(1916–2011)
2 July 1979 4 May 1981
3 Winston Cenac
(1925–2004)
4 May 1981 17 January 1982
N/A Michael Pilgrim
(1947–)
Acting Prime Minister
17 January 1982 3 May 1982
(1) Sir John Compton
(1925–2007)
3 May 1982 2 April 1996
4 Vaughan Lewis
(1940–)
2 April 1996 24 May 1997
5 Kenny Anthony
(1951–)
24 May 1997 15 December 2006
(1) Sir John Compton
(1925–2007)
15 December 2006 7 September 2007
6 Stephenson King
(1958–)
7 September 2007 30 November 2011
(5) Kenny Anthony
(1951–)
30 November 2011 Incumbent

Reference[12]

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

became an independent Commonwealth realm on 27 October 1979 with Milton Cato as the first Prime Minister. Cato had previously been Premier of Saint Vincent.

Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Tenure
Took office Left office
1 Milton Cato
(1915–1997)
27 October 1979 30 July 1984
2 Sir James Fitz-Allen Mitchell
(1931–)
30 July 1984 27 October 2000
3 Arnhim Eustace
(1944–)
27 October 2000 29 March 2001
4 Ralph Gonsalves
(1946–)
29 March 2001 Incumbent

Reference[13]

Solomon Islands

The Solomon Islands became an independent Commonwealth realm on 7 July 1978 with Peter Kenilorea as the first Prime Minister. Kenilorea had previously been Chief Minister of the Solomon Islands.

Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Tenure
Took office Left office
1 Peter Kenilorea
(1943–)
7 July 1978 31 August 1981
2 Solomon Mamaloni
(1943–2000)
31 August 1981 19 November 1984
(1) Sir Peter Kenilorea
(1943–)
19 November 1984 1 December 1986
3 Ezekiel Alebua
(1947–)
1 December 1986 28 March 1989
(2) Solomon Mamaloni
(1943–2000)
28 March 1989 18 June 1993
4 Francis Billy Hilly
(1948–)
18 June 1993 7 November 1994
(2) Solomon Mamaloni
(1943–2000)
7 November 1994 27 August 1997
5 Bartholomew Ulufa'alu
(1950–2007)
27 August 1997 30 June 2000
6 Manasseh Sogavare
(1955–)
30 June 2000 17 December 2001
7 Sir Allan Kemakeza
(1950–)
17 December 2001 20 April 2006
8 Snyder Rini
(1949–)
20 April 2006 4 May 2006
(6) Manasseh Sogavare
(1955–)
4 May 2006 20 December 2007
9 Derek Sikua
(1959–)
20 December 2007 25 August 2010
10 Danny Philip
(1953–)
25 August 2010 16 November 2011
11 Gordon Darcy Lilo
(1965–)
16 November 2011 9 December 2014
(6) Manasseh Sogavare
(1955–)
9 December 2014 Incumbent

Reference[14]

Tuvalu

Tuvalu

became an independent Commonwealth realm on 1 October 1978 with Toaripi Lauti as the first Prime Minister. Lauti had previously been Chief Minister of Tuvalu.

Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Tenure
Took office Left office
1 Toaripi Lauti
(1928–2014)
1 October 1978 8 September 1981
2 Tomasi Puapua
(1938–)
8 September 1981 16 October 1989
3 Bikenibeu Paeniu
(1956–)
16 October 1989 10 December 1993
4 Kamuta Latasi
(1936–)
10 December 1993 24 December 1996
(3) Bikenibeu Paeniu
(1956–)
24 December 1996 27 April 1999
5 Ionatana Ionatana
(1938–2000)
27 April 1999 8 December 2000
N/A Lagitupu Tuilimu
Acting Prime Minister
8 December 2000 24 February 2001
6 Faimalaga Luka
(1940–2005)
24 February 2001 14 December 2001
7 Koloa Talake
(1934–)
14 December 2001 24 August 2002
8 Saufatu Sopoanga
(1952–)
24 August 2002 25 August 2004
9 Maatia Toafa
(1954–)
11 October 2004 14 August 2006
10 Apisai Ielemia
(1955–)
14 August 2006 29 September 2010
(9) Maatia Toafa
(1954–)
29 September 2010 24 December 2010
11 Willy Telavi
(1954–)
24 December 2010 1 August 2013
12 Enele Sopoaga
(1956–)
5 August 2013 Incumbent

Reference[15]

United Kingdom

Winston Churchill

was the incumbent Prime Minister of the United Kingdom when Elizabeth became Queen.

Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Tenure
Took office Left office
1 Sir Winston Churchill
(1874–1965)
26 October 1951 6 April 1955
2 Sir Anthony Eden
(1897–1977)
6 April 1955 10 January 1957
3 Harold Macmillan
(1894–1986)
10 January 1957 19 October 1963
4 Sir Alec Douglas-Home
(1903–1995)
19 October 1963 16 October 1964
5 Harold Wilson
(1916–1995)
16 October 1964 19 June 1970
6 Edward Heath
(1916–2005)
19 June 1970 4 March 1974
(5) Harold Wilson
(1916–1995)
4 March 1974 5 April 1976
7 James Callaghan
(1912–2005)
5 April 1976 4 May 1979
8 Margaret Thatcher
(1925–2013)
4 May 1979 28 November 1990
9 John Major
(1943–)
28 November 1990 2 May 1997
10 Tony Blair
(1953–)
2 May 1997 27 June 2007
11 Gordon Brown
(1951–)
27 June 2007 11 May 2010
12 David Cameron
(1966–)
11 May 2010 Incumbent

Reference[16]

Prime ministers of former realms

This section lists prime ministers during Elizabeth's reign of former Commonwealth realms that became republics during her reign. Where an office of "Prime Minister" remained after the transition, and the incumbent at the time of transition remained in that office, the date of the end of that period in office is given in the tables below.

Ceylon (now Sri Lanka)

D. S. Senanayake

was the incumbent Prime Minister of Ceylon when Elizabeth became Queen.

Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Tenure
Took office Left office
1 D. S. Senanayake
(1883–1952)
24 September 1947 22 March 1952
2 Dudley Senanayake
(1911–1973)
26 March 1952 12 October 1953
3 Sir John Kotelawala
(1895–1980)
12 October 1953 12 April 1956
4 S. W. R. D. Bandaranaike
(1899–1959)
12 April 1956 26 September 1959
5 Wijeyananda Dahanayake
(1901–1997)
26 September 1959 20 March 1960
(2) Dudley Senanayake
(1911–1973)
21 March 1960 21 July 1960
6 Sirimavo Bandaranaike
(1916–2000)
21 July 1960 27 March 1965
(2) Dudley Senanayake
(1911–1973)
27 March 1965 29 May 1970
(6) Sirimavo Bandaranaike
(1916–2000)
29 May 1970 23 July 1977

Reference[17]

Ceylon abolished the monarchy on 22 May 1972 and renamed the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka. Bandaranaike remained in office as the republic's first Prime Minister until 23 July 1977.

Fiji

Fiji

became an independent Commonwealth realm on 10 October 1970 with Kamisese Mara as the first Prime Minister. Mara had previously been Chief Minister of Fiji.

Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Tenure
Took office Left office
1 Ratu Sir Kamisese Mara
(1920–2004)
10 October 1970 13 April 1987
2 Timoci Bavadra
(1934–1989)
13 April 1987 14 May 1987

Reference[18]

Following the 1987 Fijian coups d'état (which resulted in a vacancy in the premiership until December 1987), on 7 October 1987 the new ruling regime declared the nation to have become the Republic of Fiji. Fiji's relationship with the monarchy after this transition is complex (see Monarchy of Fiji).

The Gambia

The Gambia

became an independent Commonwealth realm on 18 February 1965 with Dawda Jawara as the first Prime Minister. Jawara had previously been the self-governing Prime Minister of the Gambia.

Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Tenure
Took office Left office
1 Sir Dawda Jawara
(1924–)
6 March 1965 24 April 1970

Reference[19]

The Gambia abolished the monarchy on 24 April 1970 via referendum. Jawara became President of the Gambia on the same day as the post of Prime Minister was abolished.

Ghana

Ghana

became an independent Commonwealth realm on 15 August 1957, with Kwame Nkrumah as its first Prime Minister. Nkrumah had previously been the self-governing Prime Minister of the Gold Coast.

Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Tenure
Took office Left office
1 Kwame Nkrumah
(1909–1972)
15 August 1957 1 July 1960

Reference[20]

Ghana abolished the monarchy on 1 July 1960 via referendum. Nkrumah became President of Ghana on the same day as the post of Prime Minister was abolished.

Guyana

Guyana

became an independent Commonwealth realm on 26 May 1966, with Forbes Burnham as its first Prime Minister. Burnham had previously been Premier of Guiana.

Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Tenure
Took office Left office
1 Forbes Burnham
(1923–1985)
26 May 1966 6 October 1980

Reference[21]

Guyana abolished the monarchy on 23 February 1970. Burnham remained in office as the republic's first Prime Minister until 6 October 1980.

Kenya

Kenya

became an independent commonwealth realm on 12 December 1963, with Jomo Kenyatta becoming the first Prime Minister. Kenyatta had previously been the self-governing Prime Minister of Kenya.

Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Tenure
Took office Left office
1
Jomo Kenyatta
(1891–1978)
12 December 1963 12 December 1964

Reference[22]

Kenya abolished the monarchy on 12 December 1964. Kenyatta became President of Kenya as the post of Prime Minister was abolished.

Malawi

Malawi

became an independent commonwealth realm on 6 July 1964, with Hastings Banda as Prime Minister. Banda had previously been the self-governing Prime Minister of Nyasaland.

Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Tenure
Took office Left office
1 Hastings Banda
(1898–1997)
6 July 1964 6 July 1966

Reference[23]

Malawi abolished the monarchy on 6 July 1966. Banda became President of Malawi as the post of Prime Minister was abolished.

Malta

Malta

became an independent commonwealth realm on 21 September 1964, with Prime Minister. Olivier had previously been the self-governing Prime Minister of Malta.

Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Tenure
Took office Left office
1 Giorgio Borġ Olivier
(1911–1980)
21 September 1964 21 June 1971
2 Dom Mintoff
(1916–2012)
21 June 1971 22 December 1984

Reference[24]

Malta abolished the monarchy on 13 December 1974. Mintoff remained in office as the republic's first Prime Minister until 22 December 1984.

Mauritius

Mauritius

became an independent commonwealth realm on 12 March 1968, with Seewoosagur Ramgoolam becoming the first Prime Minister. Ramgoolam had previously been Chief Minister of Mauritius.

Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Tenure
Took office Left office
1 Sir Seewoosagur Ramgoolam
(1900–1985)
12 March 1968 30 June 1982
2 Sir Anerood Jugnauth
(1930–)
30 June 1982 15 December 1995

Reference[25]

Mauritius abolished the monarchy on 12 March 1992. Jugnauth remained in office as the republic's Prime Minister until 15 December 1995.

Nigeria

The Federation of Nigeria became an independent commonwealth realm on 1 October 1960, with Abubakar Tafawa Balewa becoming the first Prime Minister of Nigeria. Balewa had previously been Chief Minister of the Colony and Protectorate of Nigeria.

Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Tenure
Took office Left office
1
Sir Abubakar Tafawa Balewa
(1912–1966)
1 October 1960 15 January 1966

Reference[26]

Nigeria became the Federal Republic of Nigeria on 1 October 1963. Balewa remained in office as the republic's Prime Minister until his overthrow and assassination in the 1966 Nigerian coup d'etat on 15 January 1966.

Pakistan

Khawaja Nazimuddin

was the incumbent Prime Minister of Pakistan when Elizabeth became Queen.

Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Tenure
Took office Left office
1 Sir Khawaja Nazimuddin
(1894–1964)
17 October 1951 17 April 1953
2 Mohammad Ali Bogra
(1909–1963)
17 April 1953 12 August 1955
3 Chaudhry Muhammad Ali
(1905–1980)
12 August 1955 12 September 1956

Reference[27]

Pakistan abolished the monarchy on 23 March 1956. Ali remained in office as the republic's first Prime Minister until 12 September 1956.

Sierra Leone

Sierra Leone

became an independent commonwealth realm on 27 April 1961, with Milton Margai as the first Prime Minister of Sierra Leone. Margai had previously been Prime Minister of the Protectorate of Sierra Leone.

Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Tenure
Took office Left office
1 Sir Milton Margai
(1895–1964)
27 April 1961 28 April 1964
2 Sir Albert Margai
(1910–1980)
28 April 1964 21 March 1967
3 Siaka Stevens
(1905–1988)
(see below) (see below)

Reference[28]

Siaka Stevens assumed the role of Prime Minister following his party's narrow victory in the 1967 general election. However, immediately after taking office, Stevens was deposed by the National Reformation Council in a coup d'état and placed under house arrest. Military rule persisted until an April 1968 counter-coup restored Steven's premiership.[29]

Sierra Leone became the Republic of Sierra Leone in 19 April 1971. Stevens left the office of Prime Minister two days later and became President of Sierra Leone.

South Africa

Daniel François Malan

was the incumbent Prime Minister of South Africa when Elizabeth became Queen.

Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Tenure
Took office Left office
1
Daniel François Malan
(1874–1959)
4 June 1948 30 November 1954
2
Johannes Gerhardus Strijdom
(1893–1958)
30 November 1954 24 August 1958
3 Hendrik Verwoerd
(1901–1966)
24 August 1958 6 September 1966

Reference[30]

South Africa abolished the monarchy on 31 May 1961 via referendum. Verwoerd remained in office as the republic's first Prime Minister until 6 September 1966.

Tanganyika (now Tanzania)

Tanganyika

became an independent commonwealth realm on 9 December 1961, with Julius Nyerere as its first Prime Minister. Nyerere had previously been the self-governing Prime Minister of Tanganyika.

Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Tenure
Took office Left office
1
Julius Nyerere
(1922–1999)
9 December 1961 22 January 1962
2 Rashidi Kawawa
(1926–2009)
22 January 1962 9 December 1962

Reference[31]

Tanganyika abolished the monarchy on 9 December 1962. The post of Prime Minister was abolished.

Trinidad and Tobago

Trinidad and Tobago

became an independent commonwealth realm on 31 August 1962, with Eric Williams as its first Prime Minister. Williams had previously been Premier of Trinidad and Tobago.

Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Tenure
Took office Left office
1 Eric Williams
(1911–1981)
31 August 1962 29 March 1981

Reference[32]

Trinidad and Tobago abolished the monarchy on 1 August 1976. Williams remained in office as the republic's first Prime Minister until 29 March 1981.

Uganda

Uganda

became an independent Commonwealth realm on 9 October 1962 with Milton Obote as the first Prime Minister. Obote had previously been the self-governing Prime Minister of the Uganda.

Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Tenure
Took office Left office
1
Milton Obote
(1925–2005)
9 October 1962 15 April 1966

Reference[33]

Uganda abolished the monarchy on 9 October 1963. Obote remained in office as the republic's first Prime Minister until 15 April 1966.

See also

References

  1. ^ Daniel Hall. "Antigua and Barbuda". Worldstatesmen.org. Retrieved 2015-08-12. 
  2. ^ Daniel Hall. "Australia". Worldstatesmen.org. Retrieved 2015-08-12. 
  3. ^ Daniel Hall. "The Bahamas". Worldstatesmen.org. Retrieved 2015-08-12. 
  4. ^ Daniel Hall. "Barbados". Worldstatesmen.org. Retrieved 2015-08-12. 
  5. ^ Daniel Hall. "Belize". Worldstatesmen.org. Retrieved 2015-08-12. 
  6. ^ Daniel Hall. "Canada". Worldstatesmen.org. Retrieved 2015-08-12. 
  7. ^ Daniel Hall. "Grenada". Worldstatesmen.org. Retrieved 2015-08-12. 
  8. ^ Daniel Hall. "Jamaica". Worldstatesmen.org. Retrieved 2015-08-12. 
  9. ^ Daniel Hall. "New Zealand". Worldstatesmen.org. Retrieved 2015-08-12. 
  10. ^ Daniel Hall. "Papua New Guinea". Worldstatesmen.org. Retrieved 2015-08-12. 
  11. ^ Daniel Hall. "Saint Kitts and Nevis". Worldstatesmen.org. Retrieved 2015-08-12. 
  12. ^ Daniel Hall. "Saint Lucia". Worldstatesmen.org. Retrieved 2015-08-12. 
  13. ^ Daniel Hall. "Saint Vincent and the Grenadines". Worldstatesmen.org. Retrieved 2015-08-12. 
  14. ^ Daniel Hall. "Solomon Islands". Worldstatesmen.org. Retrieved 2015-08-12. 
  15. ^ Daniel Hall. "Tuvalu". Worldstatesmen.org. Retrieved 2015-08-12. 
  16. ^ Daniel Hall. "United Kingdom". Worldstatesmen.org. Retrieved 2015-08-12. 
  17. ^ Daniel Hall. "Ceylon (now Sri Lanka)". Worldstatesmen.org. Retrieved 2015-08-12. 
  18. ^ Daniel Hall. "Fiji". Worldstatesmen.org. Retrieved 2015-08-12. 
  19. ^ Daniel Hall. "The Gambia". Worldstatesmen.org. Retrieved 2015-08-12. 
  20. ^ Daniel Hall. "Ghana". Worldstatesmen.org. Retrieved 2015-08-12. 
  21. ^ Daniel Hall. "Guyana". Worldstatesmen.org. Retrieved 2015-08-12. 
  22. ^ Daniel Hall. "Kenya". Worldstatesmen.org. Retrieved 2015-08-12. 
  23. ^ Daniel Hall. "Malawi". Worldstatesmen.org. Retrieved 2015-08-12. 
  24. ^ Daniel Hall. "Malta". Worldstatesmen.org. Retrieved 2015-08-12. 
  25. ^ Daniel Hall. "Mauritius". Worldstatesmen.org. Retrieved 2015-08-12. 
  26. ^ Daniel Hall. "Nigeria". Worldstatesmen.org. Retrieved 2015-08-12. 
  27. ^ Daniel Hall. "Pakistan". Worldstatesmen.org. Retrieved 2015-08-12. 
  28. ^ Daniel Hall. "Sierra Leone". Worldstatesmen.org. Retrieved 2015-08-12. 
  29. ^ Keen, David (2005). Conflict and Collusion in Sierra Leone. Oxford: James Currey. ISBN 0-85255-883-X. 
  30. ^ Daniel Hall. "South Africa". Worldstatesmen.org. Retrieved 2015-08-12. 
  31. ^ Daniel Hall. "Tanganyika (now Tanzania)". Worldstatesmen.org. Retrieved 2015-08-12. 
  32. ^ Daniel Hall. "Trinidad and Tobago". Worldstatesmen.org. Retrieved 2015-08-12. 
  33. ^ Daniel Hall. "Uganda". Worldstatesmen.org. Retrieved 2015-08-12. 
  • CIA list of world leaders (current, and monthly historical archive 2001–present)
  • World Statesmen.org - directory of leaders.
  • Rulers.org - directory of leaders.

Notes

  1. ^ After Christie suffered a stroke Cynthia A. Pratt served as acting Prime Minister from 4 May to 22 June 2005.
  2. ^ Maurice Bishop held de facto government control for most of the People's Revolutionary Government period (from 13 March 1979 till 14 October 1983). On 14 October 1983 Bishop was deposed by Bernard Coard and Bishop was killed on 19 October. Coard held power only briefly before military government was declared. After the invasion Grenada's pre-revolutionary system of government, and the office of Prime Minister, was restored on 4 December 1984. The website of the Grenadian government lists Bishop as a former Prime Minister, but not Coard nor any other individual who held de facto or de jure power in this period.
  3. ^ Due to the Sandline affair, Chan resigned as Prime Minister on 27 March 1997 and Giheno took over as acting Prime Minister. He regained the position on 2 June 1997, shortly before the being ousted in a general election.
  4. ^ For two periods in 2010 — 2011 Sam Abal was Acting Prime Minister.
  5. ^ The 2011–12 Papua New Guinean constitutional crisis was a dispute between Somare and O'Neill as to who held the position of Prime Minister.
  6. ^ Tuilimu served as acting prime minister following the death of Ionatana.
  7. ^ Telavi was removed from office on 1 August 2013. Sopoaga briefly served as acting Prime Minister before being sworn in as Prime Minister on 5 August 2013
  8. ^ A constitutional change ended Elizabeth II's reign in Uganda on 9 October 1963 though Uganda did not formally use the term "Republic" until 1966.
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