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List of The X Factor finalists (Australia season 2)

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Title: List of The X Factor finalists (Australia season 2)  
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Subject: The X Factor (Australian TV series), Jacob Butler, Somewhere in the World (song), Alive (Dami Im song), JTR (band)
Collection: Lists of Reality Show Participants, The X Factor (Australian Tv Series)
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List of The X Factor finalists (Australia season 2)

The second series of The X Factor Australia was broadcast on the Seven Network.[1] It premiered on 30 August 2010 and ended on 22 November 2010.[1][2] Each category was mentored by one of the show's four judges Guy Sebastian, Ronan Keating, Natalie Imbruglia and Kyle Sandilands. Sandilands mentored the Under 25 Boys,[3] Imbruglia had the Under 25 Girls,[3] Keating mentored the Over 25s and Sebastian was given the Groups.[2] Altiyan Childs was declared the winner, with Keating emerging as the winning mentor.[2]

Contents

  • Under 25 Boys 1
    • Chris Doe 1.1
    • Andrew Lawson 1.2
    • Mitchell Smith 1.3
  • Under 25 Girls 2
    • Sally Chatfield 2.1
    • India-Rose Madderom 2.2
    • Hayley Teal 2.3
  • Over 25s 3
    • Altiyan Childs 3.1
    • Amanda Grafanakis 3.2
    • James McNally 3.3
  • Groups 4
    • Kharizma 4.1
    • Luke and Joel 4.2
    • Mahogany 4.3
  • References 5

Under 25 Boys

Chris Doe

Chris Doe was a contestant from Mornington Peninsula, Victoria, who sang Tonic's "If You Could Only See" at his audition.[4] One of the reasons Doe turned up to audition for The X Factor was to try and find his father because Doe and his twin brother Peter never knew their father.[4] He began performing at the age of 15 with schoolmates in a local band.[4] Doe cited Green Day, Thirty Seconds to Mars and Nickelback as his musical inspirations.[4]

Andrew Lawson

Andrew Lawson was a contestant from Noosa, Queensland, who sang Frank Sinatra's "Fly Me to the Moon" at his audition.[5] Before entering The X Factor, Lawson was a student at the Queensland Conservatorium of Music, where he studied a Bachelor of Music, but then decided to defer his course.[5] Lawson was born in Northern Ireland but moved to New Zealand with his family at the age of six, before moving to Noosa in 2005.[5] He began playing guitar at the age of seven and writes his own music.[5] Lawson cited Elvis Presley, Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Willie Nelson and John Mayer as his musical inspirations.[5] Lawson placed third in the competition.[2]

Mitchell Smith

Mitchell Smith was a contestant from Byron Bay, New South Wales.[6] Before entering The X Factor, Smith worked in a pizza shop on weekends.[6] Smith comes from a musical family as his grandfather was a singer in a jazz band in Chicago.[6] He cited John Mayer and Eminem as his musical inspirations.[6]

Under 25 Girls

Sally Chatfield

Sally Chatfield was a contestant from Lakes Entrance, Victoria.[7] Before entering The X Factor, Chatfield was an apprentice hairdresser.[7] She began singing at the age of seven, which helped her cope with the bullying she endured at school.[7] Chatfield cited Jonny Craig as her musical influence and her family as her inspiration in life.[7] She was the runner-up of the season.[2]

India-Rose Madderom

India-Rose Madderom was a contestant from Sydney, New South Wales who sang Joss Stone's version of "Some Kind of Wonderful" at her audition.[8] Before entering The X Factor, Madderom performed covers in pubs and worked as a waitress.[8] She cited Beyoncé and Rihanna as her musical inspirations, and her mother as her main inspiration because she had always encouraged Madderom to sing and perform, despite knowing how tough the music industry is.[8]

Hayley Teal

Hayley Teal was a contestant from Adelaide, South Australia, who sang Alicia Keys' version of "How Come U Don't Call Me" at her audition.[9] Teal began performing at the age of 12.[9] Before entering The X Factor, she performed in various cover bands over the past few years.[9] Teal cited Keyshia Cole, Eric Benét, Brian McKnight, Whitney Houston, Mariah Carey, Michael Jackson and Mary J. Blige as her musical inspirations.[9]

Over 25s

Altiyan Childs

Altiyan Childs was a contestant from Sydney, New South Wales, whose first audition did not go so well, but the judges saw something in Childs and asked him to return the next day for another chance.[10] Childs was born in Mount Isa, Queensland but grew up in Sydney.[10] Childs formed his first band at the age of 12.[10] After enjoying some success with the band Masonia, whose single "Simple" reached number 41 on the ARIA Singles Chart,[11] Childs decided to retire from music.[10] Before entering The X Factor, he worked as a forklift driver.[10] Childs' father encouraged him to audition for the show.[10] He cited Prince as his musical inspiration.[10] Childs was announced the winner of the season on 22 November 2010 and received a recording contract with Sony Music Australia.[2]

Amanda Grafanakis

Amanda Grafanakis was a contestant from Melbourne, Victoria, who sang Lady Gaga's "Bad Romance" at her audition.[12] Grafanakis was born in Tasmania and comes from a Greek background.[12] She began writing songs at the age of eight and started singing lessons at the age of 12.[12] Grafanakis initially turned up to The X Factor auditions to support a friend, but ended up deciding to have a go herself.[12] She cited Michael Jackson as her musical inspiration.[12]

James McNally

James McNally was a contestant from Melbourne, Victoria.[13] Before entering The X Factor, McNally worked as a financial analyst during weekdays and often performed gigs on the weekends.[13] At the age of 15, he began writing and recording songs.[13] McNally grew up performing at Newton's High School for the Performing Arts.[13] He spent time as part of the Schools Spectacular program and performed at NRL Grand Finals and the 2000 Sydney Olympics.[13] McNally has also performed with Human Nature and Vanessa Amorosi.[13] In 2008, he auditioned for Australian Idol, but was not coping with his mother's illness and did not progress in the competition.[13] McNally cited Tina Turner as his musical inspiration.[13]

Groups

Kharizma

Kharizma was a duo from Ipswich, Queensland, which consisted of sisters Sonja and Soria.[14] They were born in New Zealand but grew up in Ipswich.[14] Kharizma cited Beyoncé, Keri Hilson and Mariah Carey as their musical influences.[14]

Luke and Joel

Luke and Joel was a duo from Newcastle, New South Wales, which consisted of brothers Luke and Joel.[15] They both grew up backstage at music gigs, with their father working as a roadie for Australian artists Marcia Hines, Mondo Rock and Jon English.[15] In 2008, Luke and Joel formed a local band called The Ondays.[15] Before entering The X Factor, Luke worked as a physiotherapist and Joel was a youth worker at an outreach program.[15] Luke also put his wedding on hold after making it into the final 12.[15] His fiancé Jessica auditioned for the show but did not make it through to the bootcamp round.[15] Luke and Joel cited 42 and The Rolling Stones as their musical inspirations.[15]

Mahogany

Mahogany was a four-member girl group from Southern Sydney, New South Wales, which consisted of sisters Maureen, Faye, Trina and Helen. They sang Boyz II Men's "Thank You" at their audition.[16] In early 2010, Mahogany served as back up singers for one of Guy Sebastian's concerts.[16] Before entering The X Factor, Maureen and Faye were primary school teachers, Helen worked in retail and Trina was a case manager at NRMA.[16] Mahogany cited Destiny's Child and The Jackson 5 as their musical influences, and Michael Jackson as their musical inspiration.[16]

References

  1. ^ a b B, Andrew (16 August 2010). "The X Factor Premiere Monday August 30, 7.30 pm". Throng. Throng Media. Retrieved 25 December 2011. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Lowie (23 November 2010). "Altiyan has The X Factor". Mediaspy.org. Retrieved 25 December 2011. 
  3. ^ a b "Series 5, Episode 7: Super bootcamp". The X Factor Australia. 11 August 2013. Seven Network.
  4. ^ a b c d "Chris Doe – The X-Factor". The X Factor Australia.  
  5. ^ a b c d e "Andrew Lawson – The X-Factor". The X Factor Australia. Yahoo!7. Archived from the original on 25 December 2011. 
  6. ^ a b c d "Mitchell Smith – The X-Factor". The X Factor Australia. Yahoo!7. Archived from the original on 25 December 2011. 
  7. ^ a b c d "Sally Chatfield – The X-Factor". The X Factor Australia. Yahoo!7. Archived from the original on 25 December 2011. 
  8. ^ a b c "India-Rose Madderom – The X-Factor". The X Factor Australia. Yahoo!7. Archived from the original on 25 December 2011. 
  9. ^ a b c d "Hayley Teal – The X-Factor". The X Factor Australia. Yahoo!7. Archived from the original on 25 December 2011. 
  10. ^ a b c d e f g "Altiyan Childs – The X-Factor". The X Factor Australia. Yahoo!7. Archived from the original on 25 December 2011. 
  11. ^ "Masonia – Simple". Australian-charts.com. Hung Medien. Retrieved 25 December 2011. 
  12. ^ a b c d e "Amanda Grafanakis – The X-Factor". The X Factor Australia. Yahoo!7. Archived from the original on 25 December 2011. 
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h "James McNally – The X-Factor". The X Factor Australia. Yahoo!7. Archived from the original on 25 December 2011. 
  14. ^ a b c "Kharizma – The X-Factor". The X Factor Australia. Yahoo!7. Archived from the original on 25 December 2011. 
  15. ^ a b c d e f g "Luke and Joel – The X-Factor". The X Factor Australia. Yahoo!7. Archived from the original on 25 December 2011. 
  16. ^ a b c d "Mahogany – The X-Factor". The X Factor Australia. Yahoo!7. Archived from the original on 25 December 2011. 
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