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List of countries by public sector

 

List of countries by public sector

This is a list of countries by public sector or the share of ILO.[4] If a source has figures for more than one year, only the most recent figure is used (with notes for exceptional circumstances).

In the former Eastern Bloc countries, the public sector in 1989 accounted for between 70% to over 90% of total employment.[5] In China a full 100% of employees were employed in the public sector by 1978, the year the Chinese economic reform was launched, after which the rates dropped to 56.4% in 1995, and to 32.8% in 2003.[6]

In the OECD-countries, the average public sector employment rate was 21.3% in 2013.[1]

List

Country OECD (%)[1][2][3] ILO (%)[4] Other estimates (%)
 Albania 16.6 (2013)
 Armenia 21.8 (2013) 17.6 (World Bank publication, 2009)[7]
 Argentina 18.0 (2014)
 Australia 18.4 (2012) 18.4 (2012)
 Azerbaijan 25.9 (2013) 21.7 (World Bank publication, 2009)[7]
 Bahamas 33.7 (2009)
 Bangladesh 4.8 (2010)
 Bahrain 34.0*[1] (Baldwin-Edwards, 2010)[8]
 Barbados 22.3 (2013)
 Belarus 40.6 (2013) 72.0 (World Bank publication, 2010)[5]
 Belgium 21.5 (2013) 21.9 (2014)
 Bermuda 10.3 (2010)
 Bhutan 17.8 (2012)
 Botswana 16.5 (2010)
 Brazil 12.1 (2013) 12.1 (2013)
 Bulgaria 24.5 (2013)
 Cameroon 4.8 (2010)
 Canada 22.4 (2013) 19.9 (2014)
 Chile 10.7 (2013) 10.7 (2013)
 China 29.3 (2004)[6]
 Colombia 4.1 (2013) 4.0 (2013)
 Costa Rica 15.2 (2013)
 Croatia 31.7 (2013)
 Czech Republic 34.0 (2009)
 Cuba 85.2 (2010)
 Denmark 34.9 (2011) 31.1 (2014)
 Dominican Republic 12.8 (2013)
 Ecuador 9.2 (2013)
 Egypt 26.3 (2013)
 El Salvador 8.4 (2013)
 Estonia 26.1 (2013) 26.1 (2013)
 Ethiopia 20.5 (2012)
 Finland 24.4 (2008)
 France 19.8 (2013) 20.0 (2014)
 Georgia 14.4 (2014) 21.1 (World Bank publication, 2009)[7]
 Ghana 6.9 (2010)
 Germany 15.4 (2009)
 Greece 22.6 (2012) 22.6 (2012)
 Guatemala 6.5 (2014)
 Guinea 2.8 (2012)
 Hungary 26.8 (2012) 26.8 (2012)
 India 4.7*[2] (2002)[9]
 Iran 16.9 (2014)
 Ireland 24.7 (2013) 24.7 (2013)
 Israel 16.5 (2007)
 Italy 17.3 (2013)
 Japan 7.9 (2013) 7.9 (2013)
 Jordan 33.1 (2004)
 Kazakhstan 23.3 (2012) 20.8 (World Bank publication, 2009)[7]
 Kuwait 44.6 (2008) 86.0*[1] (Baldwin-Edwards, 2008)[8]
 Kyrgyzstan 15.1 (World Bank publication, 2009)[7]
 Latvia 31.2 (2013) 31.2 (2013)
 Lithuania 28.6 (2013) 34.0 (World Bank publication, 2010)[5]
 Luxembourg 26.1 (2011)
 Macedonia 23.2 (2013)
 Madagascar 2.6 (2012)
 Malaysia 16.1 (2014)
 Mali 4.4 (2010)
 Mexico 11.8 (2013) 11.9 (2014)
 Moldova 26.0 (2014) 41.0 (World Bank publication, 2010)[5]
 Mongolia 24.0 (2014)
 Morocco 9.1 (2012)
OECD 21.3*[3] (2013)
 Oman 47.0*[1] (Baldwin-Edwards, 2008)[8]
 New Zealand 12.4 (2011)
 Netherlands 21.4 (2005)
 Norway 34.6 (2013) 32.8 (2014)
 Panama 15.2 (2014)
 Paraguay 9.8 (2014)
 Philippines 7.9 (2014)
 Poland 25.2 (2013) 25.2 (2013) 16.0 (World Bank publication, 2010)[5]
 Portugal 16.4 (2013)
 Qatar 11.1 (2010) 87.0*[1] (Baldwin-Edwards, 2009)[8]
 Romania 16.2 (2013) 15.3 (INS, 2015)[10]
 Russia 30.6 (2009)
 Saudi Arabia 72.0*[1] (Baldwin-Edwards, 2008)[8]
 San Marino 18.7 (2009)
 Senegal 4.7 (2011)
 Serbia 31.0 (2013)
 Seychelles 36.8 (2011)
 Slovakia 27.2 (2013) 27.2 (2013)
 Slovenia 22.9 (2012) 22.9 (2012)
 South Africa 17.4 (2013) 17.4 (2013)
 South Korea 7.6 (2013)
 Spain 17.1 (2013) 17.1 (2013)
 Sri Lanka 15.1 (2012)
 Sweden 28.1 (2013) 28.9 (2014)
  Switzerland 18.0 (2013) 18.0 (2013)
 Tajikistan 33.0 (World Bank publication, 2010)[5]
 Tanzania 3.5 (2013)
 Thailand 19.4 (2014)
 Turkey 12.9 (2011)
 Ukraine 21.7 (2012) 21.7 (2012)
 United Kingdom 23.5 (2013) 23.5 (2013)
 United States 14.6 (2008)
 Uruguay 14.9 (2014)
 Venezuela 20.1 (2013)
 Vietnam 10.3 (2014)
 Zambia 6.7 (2010)
 Zimbabwe 6.9 (2011)
  1. ^ a b c d e GCC estimates by Baldwin-Edwards are for national citizens only; migrant guest workers are most often employed in the private sector.
  2. ^ India's public sector still accounted for 69% of the country's organised workforce.
  3. ^ OECD average for 2013 does not include Australia, Czech Republic, Germany, South Korea, Ireland and Portugal.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c OECD (2015). "Employment in the public sector". Government at a Glance 2015 (Paris: OECD Publishing). 
  2. ^ a b OECD (2013). "Employment in general government and public corporations". Government at a Glance 2013 (Paris: OECD Publishing). 
  3. ^ a b OECD (2011). "Employment in General Government and Public Corporations". Government at a Glance 2011 (Paris: OECD Publishing). 
  4. ^ a b "Share of employment in the public sector by sex (%)". International Labour Organization. Retrieved 20 October 2015. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f Omar S. Arias, Carolina Sánchez-Páramo, María E. Dávalos, Indhira Santos, Erwin R. Tiongson, Carola Gruen, Natasha de Andrade Falcão, Gady Saiovici, Cesar A. Cancho (2014). Back to Work: Growing with Jobs in Europe and Central Asia. World Bank Publications. pp. 86, 101.  
  6. ^ a b Zeng, Jin (2013). State-Led Privatization in China: The Politics of Economic Reform. Routledge. pp. 52–53.  
  7. ^ a b c d e Indermit S. Gill, Ivailo Izvorski, Willem van Eeghen, Donato De Rosa (2014). Diversified Development: Making the Most of Natural Resources in Eurasia. World Bank Publications. p. 164.  
  8. ^ a b c d e Baldwin-Edwards, Martin (2011). "Labour immigration and labour markets in the GCC countries: national patterns and trends.". Kuwait Programme on Development, Governance and Globalisation in the Gulf States (London: The London School of Economics and Political Science) 15: 15. 
  9. ^ Kumar, Rajiv (2008). India and the Global Economy. Academic Foundation. p. 246.  
  10. ^ "84 pct of Romania’s employed population work in the private sector, says INS". Business Review. 30 April 2015. 
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