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List of lucky symbols

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List of lucky symbols

This is a list of lucky symbols, signs and charms. Luck is symbolized by a wide array of objects, numbers, symbols, plant and animal life which vary significantly in different cultures globally. The significance of each symbol is rooted in either folklore, mythology, esotericism, religion, tradition, necessity or a combination thereof.

Symbol Culture Notes
7 Christian [1][2]
8 Chinese Sounds like the Chinese word for "fortune". See Numbers in Chinese culture#Eight
Albatross Considered a sign of good luck if seen by sailors.[3][4]
Agimat Filipino
Bamboo Chinese [5]
Barnstar United States [6][7]
Dreamcatcher Native American (Ojibwe) [8][9]
Fish Chinese, Hebrew, Ancient Egyptian, Tunisian, Indian, Japanese [10][11][12][13][14][15]
Four-leaf clover Irish and the Celts [16][17]
Horseshoe English and several other European ethnicities Horseshoes are considered lucky when turned upwards but unlucky when turned downwards but some people believe the opposite..[18][19]
Jade Chinese
Maneki-neko Japanese, Chinese Often mistaken as a Chinese symbol due to its usage in Chinese communities, The Maneki-neko is of Japanese origin.
Pig Chinese, German [20]
Rabbit's foot A rabbit's foot can be worn or carried as a lucky charm.[21]
Wishbone Europe, North America [22]
Sarimanok Maranao
White Elephant Burmese, Thai [23]

Notes

  1. ^ Dolnick and Davidson, p. 85
  2. ^ Greer, p. 21
  3. ^ Webster, p. 6
  4. ^ Dodge, p. 748
  5. ^ Parker, p. 150
  6. ^ Urbina, Eric (July 22, 2006). "For the Pennsylvania Dutch, a Long Tradition Fades".  
  7. ^ Votruba, Cindy (September 8, 2008). "It's in the Stars".  
  8. ^ Young, Eric (February 2, 1998). "New Age Solution for Coping with Material-world Tension" ((subscription required)).  
  9. ^ Thrall, Christopher (September 17, 2005). "Objects in the mirror may be more complex than they appear" (subscription required).  
  10. ^ Helfman, p. 400
  11. ^ Marks, p. 199
  12. ^ Toussaint-Samat, p. 311
  13. ^ Hackett, Smith, & al-Athar, p. 218
  14. ^ Sen, p. 158
  15. ^ Volker, p. 72
  16. ^ Dolnick and Davidson, p. 38
  17. ^ Binney, p. 115
  18. ^ Cooper, p. 86
  19. ^ DeMello, p. 35
  20. ^ Webster, p. 202
  21. ^ Webster, p. 212
  22. ^ Edward A. Armstrong."The Folklore of Birds" (Dover Publications, 1970)
  23. ^ Lucky' white elephant for Burma"'". BBC News. November 9, 2001. 

Sources

See also

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