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List of retired South Pacific tropical cyclone names

 

List of retired South Pacific tropical cyclone names

Tropical cyclones are non-frontal, low pressure systems that develop, within an environment of warm sea surface temperatures and little vertical wind shear aloft.[1] Within the South Pacific, names are assigned from a pre-determined list, to such systems, once they reach or exceed ten–minute sustained wind speeds of 65 km/h (40 mph), near the center, by either the Regional Specialized Meteorological Center in Nadi, Fiji or the Tropical Cyclone Warning Center in Wellington, New Zealand.[1] Within the South Pacific, tropical cyclones have been officially named since the 1964–65 South Pacific cyclone season, though a few meteorological papers show that a few tropical cyclones were named before 1964–65.[2][3][4] The names of significant tropical cyclones that have caused a high amount of damage and/or caused a significant amount of deaths are retired from the lists of tropical cyclone names by the World Meteorological Organization's RA V Tropical Cyclone Committee at their bi-annual meeting.[1]

Within the South Pacific, there have been a total of 85 tropical cyclone names retired, with the 1990s having the most retired tropical cyclone names. The most intense tropical cyclone to have its name retired was Severe Tropical Cyclone Zoe, which had an estimated peak pressure of 890 mbar (26 inHg). The deadliest tropical cyclone to have its name retired was Severe Tropical Cyclone Namu, which caused over 100 deaths, when it affected the Solomon Islands in May 1986. The most damaging system was Severe Tropical Cyclone Val which caused over US$330 million in damage to seven different countries during December 1991.

Background

Within the region the credit for the first usage of personal names for weather systems, is generally given to the Queensland Government Meteorologist Clement Wragge, who named systems between 1887 - 1907.[5] Wragge used names drawn from the letters of the Greek alphabet, Greek and Roman mythology and female names, to describe weather systems over Australia, New Zealand and the Antarctic.[5] After the new Australian government had failed to create a federal weather bureau and appoint him director, Wragge started naming cyclones after political figures.[6] This system of naming weather systems subsequently fell into disuse for several years after Wragge retired, until it was revived in the region, by the New Caledonia Meteorological Office during the 1958-59 cyclone season.[5][7] During the 1963-64 cyclone season the Australian Bureau of Meteorology started to use female names for tropical cyclones that occurred within the Australian region, before the New Zealand Meteorological Service's Fiji office also started using female names for tropical cyclones within the South Pacific during the 1969-70 cyclone season.[5][7] During the International Women's Year of 1975 the NZMS decided to incorporate male names into the naming lists for the South Pacific, following a request from the Fiji National Council of Women who considered the practice discrimination.[5] At around the same time the Australian Science Minister ordered that tropical cyclones, within the Australian region should carry both men's and women's names.[5] This was because the minster thought "that both sexes should bear the odium of the devastation caused by cyclones."[5] As a result male names were added to the lists of names for both basins, ahead of the 1975-76 season.[5][8]

Later that decade as the dual sex naming of tropical cyclones started in the Northern Hemisphere, the NZMS looked at adding ethnic Pacific names to the naming lists rather than the European names that were currently used.[5] As a result of the many languages and cultures in the Pacific there was a lot of discussion surrounding this matter, with one name "Oni" being dropped as it meant the end of the world in one language.[5] One proposal suggested that cyclones be named from the country nearest to which they formed, however, this was dropped when it was realized that a cyclone might be less destructive in its formative stage than later in its development.[5] Eventually it was decided to throw names from all over the South Pacific into a pot at a training course, where each course member provided a list of names that were short, easily pronounced, culturally acceptable throughout the Pacific and did not contain any idiosyncrasies.[5] These names were then collated, edited for suitability before being cross checked with the group for acceptability.[5] It was intended that the four lists of names should be alphabetical with alternative male and female names while using only ethnic names, however it was not possible to complete the lists using only ethnic names so some European names were added in.[5] As a result there was a scattering of European names in the final naming lists, which have been used by the Fiji Meteorological Service and NZMS since the 1980-81 season.[5]

The practice of retiring significant names was started during 1955 by the United States Weather Bureau in the Northern Atlantic basin, after hurricanes Carol, Edna, and Hazel struck the Northeastern United States and caused a significant amount of damage in the previous year.[9] Initially the names were only designed to be retired for ten years after which they might be reintroduced, however, it was decided at the 1969 Interdepartmental hurricane conference, that any significant hurricane in the future would have its name permanently retired.[9][10] Several names have been removed from the Pacific naming lists for various other reasons than causing a significant amount of death/destruction, which include being pronounced in a very similar way to other names and political reasons.[11][12]

Tropical cyclone names retired in the 1970s

During the 1970s, nineteen tropical cyclone names were retired from the list of names, with the 1971–72 season having the most amount of retired tropical cyclone names. Severe Tropical Cyclone Carlotta, was the most intense tropical cyclone, during the decade with an estimated peak pressure of 940 hPa (28 inHg).


|- | Rosie || December 30, 1970 – January 4, 1971 || bgcolor=#ccffff|Category 2 tropical cyclone || bgcolor=#ccffff|100 km/h (65 mph) || bgcolor=#ccffff|980 hPa (28.94 inHg) || Vanuatu, New Caledonia || Minor || ||[13] |- | Vivienne || December 17 – 19, 1971 || bgcolor=#00faf4|Category 1 tropical cyclone || bgcolor=#00faf4|75 km/h (45 mph) || bgcolor=#00faf4|990 hPa (29.23 inHg) || French Polynesia || || || |- | Carlotta || January 8 – 26, 1972 || bgcolor=#ffffcc|Category 3 severe tropical cyclone || bgcolor=#ffffcc|155 km/h (100 mph) || bgcolor=#ffffcc|940 hPa (27.76 inHg) || Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, New Caledonia || Unknown || 4 ||[13][14] |- | Wendy || January 23 – February 9, 1972 || bgcolor=#ffffcc|Category 3 severe tropical cyclone || bgcolor=#ffffcc|155 km/h (100 mph) || bgcolor=#ffffcc|945 hPa (27.91 inHg) || Vanuatu, New Caledonia || || 4 ||[13][15] |- | Agatha || March 27 – 29, 1972 || bgcolor=#ffffcc|Category 3 severe tropical cyclone || bgcolor=#ffffcc|120 km/h (75 mph) || bgcolor=#ffffcc|980 hPa (28.94 inHg) || Cook Islands || || || |- | Bebe || October 19 – 28, 1972 || bgcolor=#ffffcc|Category 3 severe tropical cyclone || bgcolor=#ffffcc|155 km/h (100 mph) || bgcolor=#ffffcc|945 hPa (27.91 inHg) || Kiribati, Tuvalu, Fiji || $20 million || 24 ||[16][17] |- | Lottie || December 5 – 12, 1973 || bgcolor=#ffffcc|Category 3 severe tropical cyclone || bgcolor=#ffffcc|130 km/h (80 mph) || bgcolor=#ffffcc|965 hPa (28.50 inHg) || Fiji, Tonga || || 80 ||[18] |- | Tina || April 24 – 28, 1974 || bgcolor=#ccffff|Category 2 tropical cyclone || bgcolor=#ccffff|100 km/h (65 mph) || bgcolor=#ccffff|980 hPa (28.94 inHg) || Fiji, Tonga || || || |- | Alison || March 4 – 12, 1975 || bgcolor=#ffffcc|Category 3 severe tropical cyclone || bgcolor=#ffffcc|155 km/h (100 mph) || bgcolor=#ffffcc|945 hPa (27.91 inHg) || Vanuatu, New Caledonia, New Zealand || $1 million || ||[19] |- | Elsa || January 21 – 26, 1976 || bgcolor=#ccffff|Category 2 tropical cyclone || bgcolor=#ccffff|100 km/h (65 mph) || bgcolor=#ccffff|980 hPa (28.94 inHg) || Vanuatu, New Caledonia || None || ||[13] |- | Marion || January 12 – 21, 1977 || bgcolor=#ccffff|Category 2 tropical cyclone || bgcolor=#ccffff|100 km/h (65 mph) || bgcolor=#ccffff|965 hPa (28.50 inHg) || Vanuatu || || || |- | Robert || April 16 – 22, 1977 || bgcolor=#ffffcc|Category 3 severe tropical cyclone || bgcolor=#ffffcc|130 km/h (80 mph) || bgcolor=#ffffcc|980 hPa (28.94 inHg) || French Polynesia || || || |- | Bob || January 31 – February 12, 1978 || bgcolor=#ffffcc|Category 3 severe tropical cyclone || bgcolor=#ffffcc|155 km/h (100 mph) || bgcolor=#ffffcc|945 hPa (27.91 inHg) || Vanuatu, New Caledonia, Fiji, New Zealand || Moderate || 1 ||[20] |- | Charles || February 14 – 28, 1978 || bgcolor=#ffffcc|Category 3 severe tropical cyclone || bgcolor=#ffffcc|155 km/h (100 mph) || bgcolor=#ffffcc|945 hPa (27.91 inHg) || Samoan Islands || || || |- | Diana || February 15 – 22, 1978 || bgcolor=#ccffff|Category 2 tropical cyclone || bgcolor=#ccffff|100 km/h (65 mph) || bgcolor=#ccffff|980 hPa (28.94 inHg) || French Polynesia || || || |- | Fay || December 27 – 31, 1978 || bgcolor=#ccffff|Category 2 tropical cyclone || bgcolor=#ccffff|100 km/h (65 mph) || bgcolor=#ccffff|980 hPa (28.94 inHg) || Fiji || Moderate || ||[20] |- | Gordon || January 4 – 12, 1979 || bgcolor=#ffffcc|Category 3 severe tropical cyclone || bgcolor=#ffffcc|130 km/h (80 mph) || bgcolor=#ffffcc|965 hPa (28.50 inHg) || Vanuatu, New Caledonia, Australia || Severe || ||[13] |- | Kerry || February 13 - March 6, 1979 || bgcolor=#ffffcc|Category 3 severe tropical cyclone || bgcolor=#ffffcc|155 km/h (100 mph) || bgcolor=#ffffcc|945 hPa (27.91 inHg) || Solomon Islands, Australia || || 4 ||[14] |- | Meli || March 24 – 31, 1979 || bgcolor=#ffffcc|Category 3 severe tropical cyclone || bgcolor=#ffffcc|155 km/h (100 mph) || bgcolor=#ffffcc|945 hPa (27.91 inHg) || Fiji || Severe || 53 ||[20] |-class="sortbottom" ! colspan=10|[nb 1][nb 2] |}

Tropical cyclone names retired in the 1980s

During the 1980s twenty-one tropical cyclone names were retired from the naming lists, with both the 1986–87 and 1982–83 season having the most amount of retired tropical cyclone names. The most intense tropical cyclone during the decade was Severe Tropical Cyclone Oscar which had an estimated peak pressure of 920 hPa (27.17 inHg).

Name Dates active Peak classification Sustained
wind speeds
Pressure Areas affected Damage
(USD)
Deaths Refs
Wally April 2 – 7, 1980 Category 1 tropical cyclone 75 km/h (45 mph) 990 hPa (29.25 inHg) Fiji 2.26 million 18 [15][20]
Cliff February 8 – 15, 1981 Category 3 severe tropical cyclone 120 km/h (75 mph) 970 hPa (28.64 inHg) Vanuatu, New Caledonia, Australia
Tahmar March 8 – 13, 1981 Category 3 severe tropical cyclone 120 km/h (75 mph) 970 hPa (28.64 inHg) French Polynesia
Gyan December 18 – 29, 1981 Category 4 severe tropical cyclone 185 km/h (115 mph) 925 hPa (27.32 inHg) Vanuatu
Isaac February 27 – March 5, 1982 Category 4 severe tropical cyclone 175 km/h (110 mph) 930 hPa (27.46 inHg) Tonga 10 million 6 [22][23]
Joti October 31 – November 7, 1982 Category 2 tropical cyclone 110 km/h (70 mph) 975 hPa (28.79 inHg) Vanuatu
Lisa December 10 – 18, 1982 Category 2 tropical cyclone 110 km/h (70 mph) 975 hPa (28.79 inHg) Cook Islands
Mark January 21 – February 1, 1983 Category 3 severe tropical cyclone 150 km/h 90 mph 955 hPa 28.20 inHg Fiji
Oscar February 26 – March 6, 1983 Category 5 severe tropical cyclone 205 km/h (125 mph) 920 hPa (27.17 inHg) Fiji 130 million 9 [20][24]
Veena April 8 – 14, 1983 Category 4 severe tropical cyclone 185 km/h (115 mph) 955 hPa (28.20 inHg) French Polynesia
Eric January 12 – 20, 1985 Category 3 severe tropical cyclone 150 km/h (90 mph) 955 hPa (28.20 inHg) Vanautu, Fiji 40 million 9 [20][25]
Nigel January 14 – 20, 1985 Category 3 severe tropical cyclone 150 km/h (90 mph) 955 hPa (28.20 inHg) Vanautu, Fiji
Ima February 5 – 16, 1986 Category 4 severe tropical cyclone 165 km/h (105 mph) 965 hPa (28.50 inHg) Cook Islands
Namu May 16 – 22, 1986 Category 3 severe tropical cyclone 150 km/h (90 mph) 955 hPa (28.20 inHg) Solomon Islands 10 million 111 [26]
Raja December 21, 1986 – January 5, 1987 Category 3 severe tropical cyclone 150 km/h (90 mph) 955 hPa (28.20 inHg) Wallis and Futuna, Fiji 14 million 2 [15][25]
Sally December 26, 1986 – January 5, 1987 Category 3 severe tropical cyclone 150 km/h (90 mph) 955 hPa (28.20 inHg) Cook Islands, Austral Islands 24.6 million [27]
Tusi January 13 – 21, 1987 Category 3 severe tropical cyclone 150 km/h (90 mph) 955 hPa (28.20 inHg) American Samoa 24 million None [28]
Uma February 4 – 8, 1987 Category 4 severe tropical cyclone 165 km/h (105 mph) 940 hPa (27.76 inHg) Vanuatu 150 million 50 [4][29]
Anne January 5 – 14, 1988 Category 4 severe tropical cyclone 185 km/h (115 mph) 925 hPa (27.32 inHg) Vanuatu, New Caledonia Extensive 2 [4][21]
Bola February 24 – March 4, 1988 Category 4 severe tropical cyclone 175 km/h (110 mph) 940 hPa (27.76 inHg) Vanuatu, Fiji, New Zealand 82 million 3 [21][30]
Harry February 8 – 19, 1989 Category 4 severe tropical cyclone 185 km/h (115 mph) 925 hPa (27.32 inHg) New Caledonia
Lili April 7 – 11, 1989 Category 3 severe tropical cyclone 150 km/h (90 mph) 955 hPa (28.20 inHg) Solomon Islands, Vanautu, New Caledonia
[nb 1][nb 2]

Tropical cyclone names retired in the 1990s

During the 1990s twenty-six tropical cyclones names were retired from the naming lists, with the 1997–98 season having the most amount of retired tropical cyclone names. The most intense tropical cyclones during the decade were Severe Tropical Cyclones Ron and Susan which had an estimated peak pressure of 900 hPa (26.58 inHg). Severe Tropical Cyclone Val was the most damaging system, which caused about 250 million (1992 USD) in damage to four different countries during December 1991. The deadliest tropical cyclone was Severe Tropical Cyclone Martin which caused 28 deaths when it affected the Cook Islands in October and November 1997. Despite being retired the name Joni, was later reused during the 2008–09 season.

Name Dates active Peak classification Sustained
windspeeds
Pressure Land areas affected Damage
(USD)
Deaths Refs
Ofa January 27 – February 10, 1990 Category 4 severe tropical cyclone 185 km/h (115 mph) 925 hPa (27.32 inHg) Tuvalu, Tokelau, Wallis and Futuna, Western Samoa, American Samoa, Niue, Tonga $187 million 8 [31][32][33][34]
Peni February 12 – 18, 1990 Category 3 severe tropical cyclone 120 km/h (75 mph) 970 hPa (28.65 inHg) Cook Islands
Sina November 20 – December 4, 1990 Category 3 severe tropical cyclone 140 km/h (85 mph) 960 hPa (28.35 inHg) Fiji, Tonga, Niue, Cook Islands $18.5 million None [22][35][36]
Tia November 13 – 21, 1991 Category 3 severe tropical cyclone 140 km/h (85 mph) 960 hPa (28.35 inHg) Solomon Islands, Vanuatu None Minimal [21][37]
Val December 4 – 17, 1991 Category 4 severe tropical cyclone 165 km/h (105 mph) 940 hPa (27.76 inHg) Tuvalu, Western Samoa
American Samoa, Cook Islands
$330 million 16 [38][39]
Wasa December 4 – 18, 1991 Category 4 severe tropical cyclone 165 km/h (105 mph) 940 hPa (27.76 inHg) French Polynesia 2
Betsy January 4 – 15, 1992 Category 4 severe tropical cyclone 165 km/h (105 mph) 940 hPa (27.76 inHg) Vanuatu $2 million 2 [4][40]
Esau February 24 – March 7, 1992 Category 4 severe tropical cyclone 185 km/h (115 mph) 925 hPa (27.32 inHg) Vanuatu
Fran March 4 – 17, 1992 Category 4 severe tropical cyclone 185 km/h (115 mph) 920 hPa, (27.17 inHg) Wallis and Futuna, Fiji, Vanuatu
New Caledonia, Eastern Australia
Joni December 5 – 14, 1992 Category 4 severe tropical cyclone 165 km/h (105 mph) 940 hPa (27.76 inHg) Tuvalu, Fiji $1.6 million [25]
Kina December 26, 1992 – January 6, 1993 Category 3 severe tropical cyclone 150 km/h (95 mph) 955 hPa (28.20 inHg) Fiji, Tonga $110 million 26 [22][25][36]
Prema March 26 – April 6, 1993 Category 4 severe tropical cyclone 165 km/h (105 mph) 940 hPa (27.76 inHg) Vanuatu, New Caledonia $60 million [41]
Rewa December 26, 1993 – January 23, 1994 Category 5 severe tropical cyclone 205 km/h (125 mph) 920 hPa, (27.17 inHg) Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, Papua New Guinea
New Caledonia, Eastern Australia, New Zealand
Unknown 22
William December 30, 1994 – January 5, 1995 Category 2 tropical cyclone 110 km/h (70 mph) 975 hPa (28.80 inHg) Cook Islands, French Polynesia $2.5 million None [42]
Beti March 21 – April 2, 1996 Category 4 severe tropical cyclone 165 km/h (105 mph) 935 hPa (27.61 inHg) Eastern Australia, Vanuatu
New Caledonia, New Zealand
$5.6 million 2 [43][44]
Drena January 3 – 10, 1997 Category 4 severe tropical cyclone 165 km/h (105 mph) 935 hPa (27.61 inHg) New Caledonia [45]
Gavin March 3 – 12, 1997 Category 4 severe tropical cyclone 185 km/h (115 mph) 925 hPa (27.32 inHg) Tuvalu, Fiji $18.3 million [25][43][45]
Hina March 13 – 18, 1997 Category 3 severe tropical cyclone 120 km/h (75 mph) 975 hPa (28.80 inHg) Wallis and Futuna, Fiji, Tonga $75.2 million [22][25][43][45]
Keli June 7 – 17, 1997 Category 3 severe tropical cyclone 150 km/h (95 mph) 955 hPa (28.20 inHg) Tuvulu, Wallis and Futuna, Tonga $10 thousand None [46]
Martin October 27 – November 5, 1997 Category 3 severe tropical cyclone 155 km/h (100 mph) 945 hPa (27.91 inHg) Cook Islands, French Polynesia $17.6 million 28 [47][48][49]
Osea November 24 – 28, 1997 Category 3 severe tropical cyclone 150 km/h (95 mph) 955 hPa (28.20 inHg) Cook Islands, French Polynesia None [47]
Ron January 2 – 8, 1997 Category 5 severe tropical cyclone 230 km/h (140 mph) 900 hPa (26.58 inHg) Tokelau, Tonga, Niue $566 thousand None [22][43][47]
Susan December 20, 1997 – January 9, 1998 Category 5 severe tropical cyclone 230 km/h (140 mph) 900 hPa (26.58 inHg) Vanuatu, Fiji Minor 1 [47]
Tui January 25 – 27, 1998 Category 1 tropical cyclone 75 km/h (45 mph) 990 hPa (29.25 inHg) Western Samoa, American Samoa $1 million 1 [43][47]
Ursula January 30 – February 1, 1998 Category 2 tropical cyclone 110 km/h (70 mph) 975 hPa (28.79 inHg) French Polynesia Minor None [47]
Veli February 1 – 3, 1998 Category 2 tropical cyclone 100 km/h (65 mph) 985 hPa (29.09 inHg) French Polynesia Minor None [47]
Alan April 17 – April 25, 1998 Category 1 tropical cyclone 75 km/h (45 mph) 992 hPa (29.31 inHg) French Polynesia 8 [47]
Cora December 23 – 28, 1998 Category 3 severe tropical cyclone 140 km/h (85 mph) 960 hPa (28.35 inHg) Tonga $12 million None [22][50]
Dani January 15 – 22, 1999 Category 4 severe tropical cyclone 185 km/h (115 mph) 925 hPa (27.32 inHg) Vanuatu, New Caledonia, Fiji $2 million 14 [43][50][51]
Frank February 18 – 21, 1999 Category 3 severe tropical cyclone 150 km/h (95 mph) 955 hPa (28.20 inHg) New Caledonia [50]
[nb 1][nb 2]

Tropical cyclone names retired in the 2000s

During the 2000s, 20 names of significant tropical cyclones were retired from the tropical cyclone list of names. Four names were retired after both the 2002–03 and 2004–05 seasons while the 2009-10 season had five names retired. No names were retired from the naming lists, after the 2005-06 and 2008-09 seasons. During the decade, Severe Tropical Cyclone Zoe of 2002-03 became the most intense tropical cyclone to have its name retired having reached an estimated peak pressure of 890 hPa (26.28 inHg). The deadliest tropical cyclone to have its name retired during the decade was Severe Tropical Cyclone Ami which caused 17 deaths when it affected Fiji in January 2003, while the most damaging system was Severe Tropical Cyclone Heta which caused over US$225 million in damage to 7 different nations over the new year of 2003–04.

Name Dates active Peak classification Sustained
wind speeds
Pressure Areas affected Damage
(USD)
Deaths Refs
Kim February 23 – 29, 2000 Category 4 severe tropical cyclone 165 km/h (105 mph) 935 hPa (27.61 inHg) French Polynesia Minimal None [52][53]
Paula February 26 – March 4, 2001 Category 4 severe tropical cyclone 175 km/h (110 mph) 930 hPa (27.46 inHg) Vanuatu, Fiji, Tonga $1.39 million 2 [43][54]
Sose April 5 – 11, 2001 Category 2 tropical cyclone 110 km/h (70 mph) 975 hPa (28.79 inHg) Vanuatu, New Caledonia, Australia 4 [54]
Trina November 29 – December 3, 2001 Category 1 tropical cyclone 65 km/h 40 mph 995 hPa (29.38 inHg) Cook Islands $52 thousand None [55][56]
Waka December 19, 2001 – January 2, 2002 Category 4 severe tropical cyclone 175 km/h (110 mph) 930 hPa (27.46 inHg) Wallis and Futuna, Tonga $51.3 million 1 [22][43][55]
Zoe December 23, 2001 – January 1, 2003 Category 5 severe tropical cyclone 240 km/h (150 mph) 890 hPa (26.28 inHg) Solomon Islands, Vanuatu Severe None [57]
Ami January 9 – 15, 2003 Category 3 severe tropical cyclone 150 km/h (90 mph) 950 hPa (28.05 inHg) Tuvalu, Fiji, Tonga $65 million 17 [43][57][58]
Beni January 25 – February 5, 2003 Category 5 severe tropical cyclone 205 km/h (125 mph) 920 hPa (27.17 inHg) Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, New Caledonia, Australia $1 million 1 [43][57]
Cilla January 27 – 29, 2003 Category 1 tropical cyclone 75 km/h (45 mph) 995 hPa (29.38 inHg) Tonga [57]
Heta December 25, 2003 – January 8, 2004 Category 5 severe tropical cyclone 215 km/h (130 mph) 915 hPa (27.02 inHg) Samoa, American Samoa, Niue, Tonga, Wallis and Futuna $225 million 3 [15][43][59][60]
Ivy February 21 – March 2, 2004 Category 4 severe tropical cyclone 165 km/h (105 mph) 935 hPa (27.61 inHg) Vanuatu $4.35 million 2 [43][59][61]
Meena February 1 – 8, 2005 Category 5 severe tropical cyclone 215 km/h (130 mph) 915 hPa (27.02 inHg) Cook Islands Severe None [62]
Nancy February 10 – 17, 2005 Category 4 severe tropical cyclone 175 km/h (110 mph) 930 hPa (27.46 inHg) Cook Islands Severe None [62]
Olaf February 10 – 20, 2005 Category 5 severe tropical cyclone 230 km/h (140 mph) 915 hPa (27.02 inHg) Samoan islands, Cook Islands $10.2 million 9 [15][62][63][64][65]
Percy February 24 – March 5, 2005 Category 5 severe tropical cyclone 230 km/h (140 mph) 900 hPa (26.58 inHg) Tokelau, Samoan islands, Cook Islands $52 thousand [62][66]
Cliff April 1 – 6, 2007 Category 2 tropical cyclone 95 km/h (60 mph) 980 hPa 28.94 inHg Fiji, Tonga $4 million 1 [67]
Daman December 2 – 10, 2008 Category 4 severe tropical cyclone 185 km/h (115 mph) 925 hPa (27.32 inHg) Fiji, Tonga $330 thousand None [67]
Funa January 14 – 21, 2008 Category 4 severe tropical cyclone 175 km/h (110 mph) 930 hPa (27.46 inHg) Vanuatu Severe None [67]
Gene January 25 – February 9, 2008 Category 3 severe tropical cyclone 155 km/h (100 mph) 945 hPa (27.91 inHg) Fiji $35 million 8 [67][68]
Mick December 3 – 15, 2009 Category 2 tropical cyclone 110 km/h (70 mph) 975 hPa (28.79 inHg) Fiji $33 million 3 [69][70]
[nb 1][nb 2]

Tropical cyclone names retired in the 2010s

Track map of all storm names retired during the 2010s.

During the 2010s eight tropical cyclone names have been retired, because of impacts caused to either Australia or various South Pacific Island Nations including Fiji, Vanuatu and French Polynesia. The most intense tropical cyclones to have their names retired during the decade were Severe Tropical Cyclone Yasi and Ului, which had estimated peak pressures of around 930 hectopascals (27.46 inHg) at their peak intensity. The deadliest tropical cyclone to have its name retired were Severe Tropical Cyclones Tomas and Wilma, which both caused three deaths. The most damaging system was Severe Tropical Cyclone Yasi which caused over US$3 billion in damage to Vanuatu, Solomon Islands and Australia during January and February 2010.

Name Dates active Peak classification Sustained
wind speeds
Pressure Areas affected Damage
(USD)
Deaths Refs
Oli January 29 – February 7, 2010 Category 4 severe tropical cyclone 185 km/h (115 mph) 925 hPa (27.32 inHg) Cook Islands, French Polynesia $70 million 1 [15][71]
Pat February 6 – 11, 2010 Category 3 severe tropical cyclone 155 km/h (95 mph) 955 hPa (28.20 inHg) Cook Islands Severe 2
Tomas March 9 – 17, 2010 Category 4 severe tropical cyclone 185 km/h (115 mph) 925 hPa (27.32 inHg) Wallis and Futuna, Fiji $45 million 3 [72]
Ului March 9 – 21, 2010 Category 5 severe tropical cyclone 215 km/h (130 mph) 930 hPa (27.46 inHg) Vanuatu, Solomon Islands, Australia $72 million 1 [73]
Vania January 5 – 15, 2011 Category 2 tropical cyclone 100 km/h (65 mph) 973 Vanuatu, New Caledonia, New Zealand $11 million None [74]
Wilma January 19 – 28, 2011 Category 4 severe tropical cyclone 185 km/h (115 mph) 935 hPa (27.61 inHg) Samoan Islands, Tonga, New Zealand $22 million 3 [75][76]
Yasi January 26 – February 7, 2011 Category 5 severe tropical cyclone 215 km/h (130 mph) 929 hPa (27.43 inHg) Vanuatu, Solomon Islands, Australia
Atu February 13 – 24, 2011 Category 4 severe tropical cyclone 165 km/h (105 mph) 937 hPa (27.67 inHg) New Caledonia, Vanuatu
[nb 1]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e Reference for names retired and season.[1]
  2. ^ a b c d Reference for tropical cyclone dates, season, windspeeds and pressure between 1969-70 and 2005-06.[21]

References

  1. ^ a b c d Unattributed (May 23, 2011). "Tropical Cyclone Operational Plan for the South-East Indian Ocean and the Southern Pacific Ocean" (PDF). RA V Tropical Cyclone Committee. World Meteorological Organization. Retrieved May 23, 2011. 
  2. ^ Terry, James P. (2007). "3.4". Tropical cyclones: climatology and impacts in the South Pacific. Springer. pp. 30–31. ISBN . 
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