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List of songs about Oklahoma

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List of songs about Oklahoma

This is a list of songs about the U.S. state of Oklahoma, Oklahomans and Oklahoma locations.

Contents

  • Songs about Oklahoma 1
    • # 1.1
    • A 1.2
    • B 1.3
    • C 1.4
    • D 1.5
    • E 1.6
    • F 1.7
    • G 1.8
    • H 1.9
    • I 1.10
    • K 1.11
    • L 1.12
    • M 1.13
    • N 1.14
    • O 1.15
    • P 1.16
    • Q 1.17
    • R 1.18
    • S 1.19
    • T 1.20
    • U 1.21
    • V 1.22
    • W 1.23
    • Y 1.24
  • See also 2
  • References 3
  • External links 4

Songs about Oklahoma

#

A

B

  • "The Bad Roads of Oklahoma" — Susan Herndon, 2010.[10]
  • "Back in Oklahoma" – Written and performed by Jamie Richards, 2004.[11]
  • "Back in Oklahoma" – Wayde Blair, 2006.[12]
  • "Back to Oklahoma" – Ned Miller, 1970; written by Alan O'Day.[13]
  • "Back to Oklahoma" – Michael Fracasso, 1995.[14]
  • "Back to Oklahoma" – Jim Layeux, 1998.[15]
  • "Back to Oklahoma" – Donnie Duree, 2009.[16]
  • "Baja Oklahoma" – written by Willie Nelson and Dan Jenkins for the HBO movie of the same name, 1988. Later recorded by Karla Bonoff.[17]
  • "Ballad of the Oklahoma Women's Liberation Front" – Beth Elliott, 1976.[18]
  • "Beim alten Bill in Oklahoma" – Written by Ulrich Jonas, Peter Power and Rolf Soja, recorded by Heino, 1979.[19]
  • “Big Boat Across Oklahoma” – Hank Thompson, co-written with William Penix, 1969.[20]
  • "Big Cedar" – Bill Grant and Delia Bell, 1980.[21]
  • "Blown Away" – written by Josh Kear and Chris Tompkins, recorded by Carrie Underwood, 2012.[22]
  • "Blues for Oklahoma" – Virgel Bozman, 1950.[23]
  • "Bob's Got a Swing Band in Heaven" – Red Steagall, 1978.[24]
  • "Border Oklahoma" – Norfolk & Western, 2001.[25]
  • "Boy from Oklahoma" (about Woody Guthrie) – Willis Alan Ramsey, 1972.[26]
  • "Boys from Oklahoma" – Written by Gene Collier; recorded by Cross Canadian Ragweed, 2002.[27]

C

D

E

  • ”En un Carril de Oklahoma” – written by Ramiro Cleto, recorded by Vagon Chicano, 2006. [49]
  • "Endless Oklahoma Sky” – John Moreland and the Black Gold Band, 2008.[50]
  • "Enid, Oklahoma" – Brad Fielder, 2010.[51]
  • "The Everlasting Hills of Oklahoma" – Tim Spencer, founding member of the Sons of the Pioneers, 1946. Composed for the 1946 film Home in Oklahoma.[52]

F

  • "Fabulous Oklahoma" – Hank Harral, 1957.[53]
  • "Falling (It's a Long Long Way From Hollis, Oklahoma)” – Terry Stafford, 1989.[54]
  • "Farmer's Luck" – Written and recorded by Greg Jacobs, 2001. Later recorded by Jason Boland & the Stragglers, 2011. About the creation of Lake Eufaula.[55]
  • ”Fire Eyed Woman from Oklahoma” – written by Brandon L. Harris, recorded by the Franklin Brothers, 1970.[56]
  • "Fly Over States" – written by Neil Thrasher and Michael Dulaney, recorded by Jason Aldean, 2010.[57]
  • "For Oklahoma, I’m Yearning" – Jack Guthrie, cowritten with his sister Wava White, recorded 1947, unreleased until 1991.[58]
  • "Freedom, Oklahoma" – Rascal and McLane XL The Band, from Germany, 2006.[59]
  • "From Oklahoma with Love" – Becky Hobbs, 1998.[60]
  • "From Tulsa to North Carolina" – Link Wray, co-written with his band's drummer Steve Verroca; recorded 1971, released on the LP Beans and Fatback, 1973.[61]

G

  • "The Gal from Oklahoma" – Junior Brown, 1993.[62]
  • "Girl from Oklahoma” – Beau Jennings, 2008.[63]
  • "Girl from Oklahoma" – Steel Panther, 2009.[64]
  • "The Girl in Oklahoma" – written by Billy McCoy, recorded by Tracey K. Houston, 2000.[65]
  • "The Girl Who Danced Oklahoma" – Terry Allen, 1978.[66]
  • ”Give Me a Home in Oklahoma” – Gene Austin, 1947.[67]
  • "God Is Down in Oklahoma" – Mike West, 2000.[68]
  • "God's in Oklahoma Today” – Justin McBride, co-written with Philip O’Donnell and Wynn Varble, 2008.[69]
  • "Goin' Back to Oklahoma" – Eddie Meduza, 1979.[70]
  • "Goin' to Oklahoma" – written by Bob Bryden, recorded by Christmas, 1970.[71]
  • "Going Back to Oklahoma" – Emily Kaitz, 1998.[72]
  • "Going Out to Tulsa" – written by C. E. Daniels, recorded by Johnny Seay, 1968.[73]
  • "Going to Scotland" – The Mountain Goats, 1996.
  • "Good Old Oklahoma" – written by Tommy Duncan, lead singer with Bob Wills and the Texas Playboys, and recorded by them in 1935.     New recording by JD McPherson and Pokey Lafarge released July, 2013.[74]
  • "Goodbye Oklahoma" – written by Eberhard (Lo) Faber, recorded by God Street Wine, 1997.
  • "Gotta Get to Oklahoma ('Cause California's Gettin' to Me)" – The Hagers; written by Buck Owens and Rodney Lay, 1969.
  • "(Gotta Get To) Oklahoma City" – Written by Don Reed and Dan Franklin, recorded by Luke Wills' Rhythm Busters, 1947.[75]
  • "The Great State of Oklahoma" – Ali Harter, 2012.
  • "Guthrie" – Hank Thompson, 1969.[76]

H

  • "Halfway to Tulsa" – written by Leroy Drumm and Calvin Freeman, recorded by Larry Sparks, 1992.
  • "Happy, Oklahoma" – Hank Thompson, co-written with William Penix, 1969.[77]
  • "He's a Real Gone Oakie" – written by Mary London, recorded by Judy Hayden with Cliffie Stone and His Orchestra, 1948.[78]     See below under S for a male vocalist version, "She's a Real Gone Oakie."
  • "Heart of Oklahoma" – Mark Whitehead
  • "Hell and Oklahoma" – The Michael Abbott Band.
  • "Henryetta, Oklahoma" – Marvin Rainwater, co-written with Dale Siegenthaler, 1981.
  • "Here with You" – Saliva.
  • "Hollis, Oklahoma" – The Tyler McCumber Band
  • "Holy Tulsa Thunder" – Beau Jennings, 2008.
  • "Home in Oklahoma" – written by Jack Elliott for Roy Rogers and the Sons of the Pioneers in their 1946 movie also called Home in Oklahoma.
  • "Home Sweet Oklahoma" – written by Tom Glazer, recorded by Roy Rogers, 1951.[79][80]
  • "Home Sweet Oklahoma" – written and recorded by Leon Russell, 1970.[81]
  • "Home, Sweet Oklahoma" – written and recorded by Tom Paxton, 1991.[82]
  • "Home Sweet Oklahoma" – Patrick Brealey & the Knives, 2007.
  • "Home Sweet Oklahoma" – Patti Page and Vince Gill, written by Ted Hewitt and Kris Bergsnes, 2008.[83]    (The Glazer, Russell, Paxton, Brealey and Hewitt/Bergsnes songs are five completely different compositions.)
  • "Homesick, Lonesome, Hillbilly Okie" – Hank Thompson, co-written with William Penix, 1969.[84]
  • "Hungover in Oklahoma City" – Joe "King" Carrasco.

I

K

  • "Kiamichi Mountain Home" – Bill Grant and Delia Bell.
  • "The Kiamichi Trace" – Bill Grant.
  • "King of Oklahoma" – Michael Franks, 1973.

L

  • "Last Trip to Tulsa" – Neil Young, 1968.[92]
  • "Lawton, Oklahoma Blues" – Soldier Boy Houston. Recording appears on a Lightnin' Hopkins anthology CD.
  • "Leroy's Dust Bowl Blues" – Steve Earle and Del McCoury.
  • "A Long Way from OK" – Jeff Wood, 1997.
  • "A Long Way from OK" – Granger Smith, 2005.
  • "Lonesome Okie Goin' Home" – Merl Lindsay, 1947.
  • "Lost My Heart in Oklahoma" – Kevin Fowler, 1997.
  • "Loves in Oklahoma" – Jason Eklund, 1993.

M

N

O

  • "O-k-l-a-h-o-m-a" – Hank Thompson, 1969. Also known as "O K L A H O M A" and "Oklahoma."[98]
  • "Oakie Boogie" – Johnny Tyler, 1947; also recorded by Jack Guthrie, Ella Mae Morse, others.
  • "Okie" – J. J. Cale, 1974.
  • "Okie Blondie" – Hank Thompson.
  • "Okie from L.A." – Cort Murray.
  • "Okie from Muskogee" – Merle Haggard, co-written with Roy Eddie Burris, 1969. #1 for 4 weeks on the Billboard Country chart.[99][100]
  • "Okie Moon" – Steve Suffet, 2005.
  • "Okie Noodlin' " – Como Avenue Jug Band, 2011.
  • "Okie Road" – Homer Joy, 2007.
  • "Okie Skies" – The Bays Brothers, 2004.
  • "The Okie Surfer" – written by David Gates, lead singer of The Country Boys, 1964.[101][102][103]
  • "Okie Wind" – Greg Jacobs
  • "Okies in California" – Doye O'Dell, 1949.
  • "Oklahoma" – many different songs have this one-word title. The list that follows gives some samples from their lyrics to distinguish them from each other:
  • "Oklahoma" – The Answering Machine, 2006. Written by Colclough/Fogarty/Evans/Perry.   "Oklahoma, she won't be your friend /She waits at the disco for her song to end."
  • "Oklahoma" – Bathtub Mary. "Leavin' Oklahoma the car broke down." Probable writers: Phil DaRosa and Jon Wearn.
  • "Oklahoma" – Billy Gilman. Key line: "Son, we think we found your dad in Oklahoma." Writers: John Allen, David Vincent Williams.[104]
  • "Oklahoma" – Bishop Allen. "You've got eyes like Oklahoma/Learn to swim in Lake Texoma."
  • "Oklahoma" – Bob Schneider. "She came from Oklahoma, said the end of the world was on its way."
  • "Oklahoma" – The Call. "Another hot Oklahoma night." Writer: band member Michael Been.
  • "Oklahoma" – Common Rotation—Adam Busch, Eric Kufs and Jordan Katz. Chorus begins with "There's a skyline in Oklahoma, stretches out over the corn." Lyrics by Eric Kufs, music by all three band members.
  • "Oklahoma" – Dan Bern. "On the 19th day of April/In 1995/There was the worst car bombing/Near 200 people died."
  • "Oklahoma" – Darkest Hour. "Within a mechanical pose/And a heart pumping a need for control." Writers: Paul Burnette, John Henry, Kris Norris, Ryan Parrish, Mike Schleibaum.
  • "Oklahoma" – The Dead Salesmen (Australian duo). Only reference to Oklahoma is a single mention 40 seconds from the end of the song.
  • "Oklahoma" – Elvin Bishop. Blues autobiography: "I come all the way from Oklahoma."
  • "Oklahoma" – Fink, 1997. In German. “Der wind in Oklahoma ist der gleiche/Wie hier nur er gehört nach Oklahoma.”
  • "Oklahoma" – Fred Gillen, Jr. From 2nd verse: "I'm not going down without a fight the like of which/will knock out every light/and burn out every switch in Oklahoma."
  • "Oklahoma" – The Hard Chihuahuas. "I was raised in Eviston, Oklahoma....I'm comin' home, with a new way to look at the world."
  • "Oklahoma" – Written by J.C. (Christer) Ericcson, recorded by Lasse Stefanz, 1986. In Swedish.[105] “Långt bort till Oklahoma, bort till Nashville Tennessee.”
  • "Oklahoma" – Lynn Woolever. "Let me die in Oklahoma/Lay me down in Tulsa Town."
  • "Oklahoma" – P (Johnny Depp and Gibby Haynes).
  • "Oklahoma!" (Since 1953, Oklahoma's official state song) – Rodgers and Hammerstein.[106] "Where the wind comes sweeping down the plain."
  • "Oklahoma?" – from the musical Dirty Rotten Scoundrels by David Yazbek, 2004. “And the shade is mighty thin in Oklahoma/And our leading cause of death is Melanoma.”
  • "Oklahoma" – One-Eyed Jack. "Say you never get to heaven, Oklahoma's not that far."
  • "Oklahoma" – Cal Smith; written by Webb Pierce and Max Powell, 1967. "Oklahoma how I wish I could come home."
  • "Oklahoma" – Quarkspace: band members Paul Williams, Darren Gough, Chet Santia, Jay Swanson. 1996 space-rock.
  • "Oklahoma" – Sammy Kershaw. "Oklahoma, you got the best part of me."
  • "Oklahoma" – Scud Mountain Boys. Probable writer: band leader Joe Pernice. "She's gone to Oklahoma/I don't know where that is."
  • "Oklahoma" – Van Zant. "Come Hell or come high water/We'll stand together in the rain/Oklahoma."
  • "Oklahoma" – Whiskeytown on the EP Rural Free Delivery. "See old Mabel walk on down . . ." No audible reference to Oklahoma.
  • "Oklahoma" – Willamena. Written by Chad Hendrickson and Lucas Ross (Ten Lanes Wide, ASCAP). "I'll be home soon, my Oklahoma's just on the rise."
  • "Oklahoma, A Toast" – written by Harriet Parker Camden of Kingfisher, OK, in 1905. With additional music by Marie Crosby, adopted as the first official state song of Oklahoma in 1935. Replaced in 1953 as official state song by Rodgers and Hammerstein's "Oklahoma!"
  • "Oklahoma Annie" – Monty Harper and Evalyn Harper, 2007.
  • "Oklahoma Baby" – Johnny and the Jailbirds (Johnny Wall and Richard Ball), 1980.
  • "Oklahoma Baby" – Don Fowler and the Country Timers, 1966.
  • "Oklahoma Backroads" – Bill Caswell, 1980.
  • "Oklahoma Backroom Dancer" – Michael Martin Murphey, using the pseudonym Travis Lewis; recorded by the Monkees.
  • "Oklahoma Bay" – Peggy March. In German, 1978.
  • "Oklahoma Bill" – Stuart Hamblen, later recorded by Jimmy Dean.
  • "Oklahoma Blues" – at least nine different songs with this title have been recorded:
  • "Oklahoma Blues" – written in 1928 and recorded several times by Frankie Marvin, sometimes using the name Frank Wallace; the oldest.[107][108]  Later recorded by Bill Boyd and His Cowboy Ramblers under the title "I've Got Those Oklahoma Blues" and more recently, with the original title, by Sourdough Slim (Rick Crowder) and by the Any Old Time String Band.
  • "Oklahoma Blues" – Zeke Clements, 1946. Recorded by Zeke Clements and His Western Swing Gang; also recorded by Luke Wills.
  • "Oklahoma Blues" – Jimmy Wakely, 1948.
  • "Oklahoma Blues" – Patti Page recorded this composition by her manager, Jack Rael, 1949.
  • "Oklahoma Blues" – Gene Chapman, 1960. Rockabilly.
  • "Oklahoma Blues" – DeGarmo and Key, 1982. Christian rock.
  • "Oklahoma Blues" – Steve Ripley, 2002.
  • "Oklahoma Blues" – Watermelon Slim, 2003.
  • "Oklahoma Blues" – Homer Joy, 2008. "Oklahoma is all I know, . . . Oklahoma ain't perfect, but neither am I."
  • "Oklahoma Bombs" – Delicate AWOL.
  • "Oklahoma Boogie" – John Balogh, recorded by Louie Bashell.
  • "Oklahoma Boogie" — Leon Russell, 2008.
  • "Oklahoma Border" – R. David Cash, 2006.
  • "Oklahoma Borderline" – Vince Gill, Guy Clark and Rodney Crowell co-wrote the song that was recorded by Gill in 1985.
  • "Oklahoma Bound" – Paul Westmoreland. Also recorded by Bill Boyd and His Cowboy Ramblers.
  • "Oklahoma Bound" – Homer Zeke Clemons, 1950.
  • "Oklahoma Bound" – Joe West, 2005.
  • "Oklahoma Bound" – Wes Reynolds, 2008.
  • "Oklahoma Bound" – Brian Collins, 2011.     (The listed songs entitled "Oklahoma Bound" are five completely different compositions.)
  • "Oklahoma Boy Blues" — Jimmie Creswell, co-written with Sherman Bankston.
  • "Oklahoma Breakdown" – Michael Hosty. Recorded by the Hosty Duo, then by Stoney LaRue.
  • "Oklahoma Broke My Heart" – Syd Masters and the Swing Riders, 2013.
  • "Oklahoma Charley" – Bud Billings (Frank Luther) and Carson Robison.
  • "Oklahoma Christmas" – Written by Rob Byus, Jenee Fleenor and Trent Willmon. Recorded by Blake Shelton and Reba McEntire, 2012.
  • "Oklahoma Christmas Spirit" – Gannon/Lowe/Robin Ruddy, composers. Recorded by Dana Spencer.
  • "Oklahoma City" – written by Fred Rose, recorded by Paul Howard and His Cotton Pickers, 1947.
  • "Oklahoma City" – Nine Days, 1996.
  • "Oklahoma City" – Kim Fowley, 1998.
  • "Oklahoma City" – Argyle Street, 2008.
  • "Oklahoma City" – Cake Bake Betty, 2009.
  • "Oklahoma City Alarm Clock" – The Fixtures.
  • "Oklahoma City Blues" – Jimmy Wakely. Wakely earlier recorded the song as "Oklahoma Blues." This one (with "City") is a little shorter, but has the same words and tune.
  • "Oklahoma City Blues" – Neal Pattman. (Wakely's and Pattman's songs are two completely different compositions.)
  • "Oklahoma City on the Radio" – Charley Austin
  • "Oklahoma City Times" – Paul Hampton. Recorded by the Limeliters, Ray Peterson, Bobby Sherman and Hamilton Camp.
  • "Oklahoma City Woman Blues" – Matthew Campbell, recorded by The Deep Vibration.
  • "Oklahoma Country" – The Stampeders.
  • "Oklahoma Country Girl" – Elvin Bishop.
  • "Oklahoma Crude" – The Corbin/Hanner Band, 2007.
  • "Oklahoma Daydreams" – Jody Adams, 2008. Recorded by Palmer Divide.
  • "Oklahoma Dust" – Joe Diffie and Leslie Ann Winn, recorded by The Notorious Cherry Bombs.
  • "Oklahoma Fields" – Chad Lewis.
  • "Oklahoma Flower" – Ed and Jolene Bullard.
  • "Oklahoma '41" – Mark Elliott
  • "Oklahoma Gal" – Spade Cooley and Smokey Rogers, 1945.[109]
  • "Oklahoma Gal" – written by Tracy Byrd, Frank Dycus and Mark Nesler; recorded by Ray Pillow, 2004.
  • "Oklahoma Gals" – Bob Wills.
  • "Oklahoma Girl" – written by band members Mike Eli (Diaz) and Jon Jones, recorded by the Eli Young Band, 2008.
  • "Oklahoma Girl" – written by C. R. Bridges, recorded by Leon Russell, 2008.
  • "Oklahoma Girl" – Susan Herndon, co-written with Bob Livingston and John Hadley, 2010.[110]
  • "Oklahoma Going Home" – Kate Wolf, 1976.
  • "Oklahoma Gypsy Shuffler" – Adam Carroll, 2008.
  • "Oklahoma Heart" – Becky Hobbs.
  • "Oklahoma Hell" – Henson Cargill, 1972.
  • "Oklahoma Heroes At the Library" – Monty Harper, 20007.
  • "Oklahoma Hills" (Oklahoma's official folk song) – Woody Guthrie/Jack Guthrie.[111]
  • "Oklahoma Home Brew" – Hank Thompson, co-written with William Penix, 1969.[112]
  • "Oklahoma, Home of Mine" – Loggins and Messina.
  • "Oklahoma, Home of My Heart" – Curtis Leach, 1964.
  • "Oklahoma Honky Tonk Gal" – Sheb Wooley, 1945.
  • "Oklahoma, I Love You" – written by Opal Harrison Williford, arranged by Clarence Woods, 1938.[113]
  • "Oklahoma Indian Jazz" – written by Ray Hibbeler, T. J. Johnsen, J. W. Barna, T. Guarini, and J. J. Murrin. Recorded as an instrumental by the Benson Orchestra of Chicago, and with vocals by Jules Herbuveaux and his Guyon's Paradise Orchestra, 1923.[114][115]
  • "Oklahoma is a State of Mind," Peter Kalla, 2009.
  • "Oklahoma is Callin' Me Home" – Melissa Black.
  • "Oklahoma Joe" – Chris LeDoux, written by Gil Milan.
  • "The Oklahoma Kid" – Goebel Reeves, "The Texas Drifter."
  • "Oklahoma Kids, a Kaleidoscope" – Monty Harper, 2007.
  • "Oklahoma Land" – Hank Harral, 1959.[116]
  • "Oklahoma, Land of the Sunny West," 1929. – Frankie Marvin.[117]
  • "Oklahoma Land Rush, 1889" – Monty Harper, 2007.
  • "Oklahoma Lou" – Bob and Jim (The Tulsa Cowboys)--Bob Armstrong & Jim Childress
  • "Oklahoma Loves You" – Laura Cooper and the Honest Johns.
  • "Oklahoma Lovin'" – The Swon Brothers, 2012.
  • "Oklahoma Man Blues" – Lucille Bogan, 1927.
  • "The Oklahoma Miner" – Kevin Danzig.
  • "Oklahoma Moon" – Oscar Brand, 1949.
  • "Oklahoma Moon" – Bill Snow, Jr., 2006.
  • "Oklahoma Moon" – Chad Sullins and the Last Call Coalition, 2012.
  • "Oklahoma Morning" – Charley Pride, 1975; written by Jim Chesnut
  • "Oklahoma Music Shop" – Becky Hobbs, 2015.
  • "Oklahoma, My Home" – George Dickey.
  • "Oklahoma, My Native Land" (Oklahoma's official children's song) – Martha Kemm Barrett.[118]
  • "Oklahoma Nights" – written by Jimmy Webb, recorded by Arlo Guthrie, 1981.
  • "Oklahoma Nights" Written by William Roy "Doc" Swicegood, recorded by Troy Aikman on the all-Dallas-Cowboy CD Everybody Wants to Be a Cowboy, 1995.
  • "Oklahoma Nights" (Hum) – Dryve
  • "Oklahoma – 1955" Les Gilliam, 2010.
  • "Oklahoma Polka" – Georgia Gibbs
  • "Oklahoma Porch Song" – Brad Fielder
  • "Oklahoma Promise" – Red Steagall, 1972.[119]
  • "Oklahoma Rag" – Bob Wills.
  • "Oklahoma Rising" – Vince Gill, co-written with Jimmy Webb.
  • "Oklahoma Roots" – Mare Wakefield
  • "The Oklahoma Rose" – Percy French, 1910.
  • "Oklahoma Rose" – Rex Allen, Jr., co-written with Judy Maud.
  • "Oklahoma Rose" – Jim and Jesse, written by Jesse McReynolds; also recorded by Goldwing Express as "My Rose of Oklahoma"
  • "Oklahoma Rounder" – Jimmie Revard and His Oklahoma Playboys, 1936.
  • "Oklahoma Saturday Night" – John Nelson, 2012.
  • "Oklahoma Shines" – Mel McDaniel
  • "Oklahoma Skies" – Jody Stevens
  • "Oklahoma Skies" – Sarah Dye
  • "Oklahoma Sky" – Lexi Pierson.
  • "Oklahoma Sky" – Miranda Lambert.
  • "Oklahoma Song" – Hoyt Axton, 1973.
  • "Oklahoma Sooner" – David Chamberlain, 2010.
  • "Oklahoma Stardust Blues" – The Spikedrivers, 2003.
  • "Oklahoma State of Mind" – Kane, 2001.
  • "Oklahoma Stomp" – Duke Ellington.
  • "Oklahoma Stomp" – Spade Cooley.
  • "Oklahoma Sunday Morning" – written by Albert Hammond, Mike Hazlewood and Tony Macaulay; recorded by Glen Campbell, 1972.
  • "Oklahoma Sunset" – Travis Kidd
  • "Oklahoma Sunsets" – Hayden Miller.
  • "Oklahoma Sunshine" – Waylon Jennings, 1974; written by George Reneau and Harold Bynum.
  • "Oklahoma Sunshine" – Jerry Reed, 1976; written by Mike Settle.
  • "Oklahoma Sunshine" – Scout Cloud Lee
  • "Oklahoma Superstar" – Written by John Durrill, recorded by Brenda Lee, 1976.[120]
  • "Oklahoma Sweetheart" – George Thorogood, 1991.
  • "Oklahoma Sweetheart Sally Ann" – Rose Maddox, 1950.
  • "Oklahoma Swing" – Vince Gill with Reba McEntire, 1990; written by Gill and Tim DuBois.
  • "Oklahoma Tape Deck" – Chris Brown and Kate Fenner, 1999.
  • "Oklahoma Territory" – John Williams. Part of film score of Far and Away.
  • "Oklahoma-Texas Line" – Rascal Flatts (Gary Levox, Jay DeMarcus, and Joe Don Rooney), 2004.
  • "Oklahoma, That's for Me" – Written by Peggy Johnson and Johnnie Lee Wills; recorded by Johnnie Lee Wills and His Boys, 1951.[121]
  • "Oklahoma 3/4 Moon" – John Sprott.
  • "Oklahoma Tom" – Die Sieben Raben. In German. 1956 hit record.
  • "Oklahoma Tornado" – Mickey Jones.
  • "Oklahoma Towns" – R. W. Hampton with Rich O'Brien and the Enid Symphony Orchestra, 2007.
  • "Oklahoma Twilight" – written and recorded by Wayne Parker, 1976. Recorded again by his nephew, Kevin Danzig, 2008.
  • "Oklahoma Twister" — Cal Smith, written by Max Barnes, 1978.
  • "Oklahoma, U.S.A." — The Kinks, 1971.
  • "Oklahoma Waltz" – Jack Perry & the Light Crust Doughboys.
  • "Oklahoma Waltz"– co-written by Cindy Walker and Spade Cooley; recorded by the Spade Cooley Orchestra with vocal by Red Egner, 1947.[122][123]
  • "Oklahoma Waltz" – Johnny Bond, 1948; written by "Jimmy Kenton," a pseudonym for Johnny Bond.[124][125][126]
  • "Oklahoma Waltz" – Byron Berline. Fiddle instrumental.
  • "Oklahoma Waltz" – Border Radio
  • "Oklahoma Waltz" – Acie Cargill, Cindy Lee Ward.  (Each of the six "Oklahoma Waltz" songs listed is a different composition.)
  • "Oklahoma, Where The West Remains" – R.W. Hampton
  • "Oklahoma Wind" – written by Dale J. Smith. Designated the official Oklahoma State Waltz, 1982.[127][128]
  • "Oklahoma Wind" – Mel McDaniel, 1978.
  • "Oklahoma Wind" – Billy Joe Shaver, 1982; he later recorded it with Waylon Jennings, 1996.
  • "Oklahoma Wind" – Tonic Sol-Fa, a cappella, written by their lead singer Shaun Johnson, who later recorded it as a solo with instrumental accompaniment.
  • "Oklahoma Wind" – Gretchen Anderson, 2003.
  • "Oklahoma Wind" – Hunt Family Bluegrass.      (Each of the six "Oklahoma Wind" songs listed is a different composition.)
  • "Oklahoma Woman" – Roger Miller, 1977.[129]
  • "Oklahoma's Calling" – Jack Guthrie, 1946. (Uses the melody and most of the words of Jack Sutton's 1944 song, "Montana Cowboy")
  • "Oklahoma's Going Dry" – I See Hawks In L.A.
  • "Oklahoma's Home to Me" – George Highfill.
  • "Old Oklahoma" – Ben Steneker recorded Johnny Bond's "Oklahoma Waltz" under this title.
  • "Old Oklahoma Waltz" – Frankie Yankovic recorded Johnny Bond's "Oklahoma Waltz" using this title.
  • "On the Oklahoma Prairie" – Kathy McMearty
  • "On the Road to Tulsa" – The Interociter
  • "Only Oklahoma Away" – Ken "Bucky" Jones and Claude Putman, writers; recorded by John Conlee (1981), Leroy Van Dyke (1982), and Nat Stuckey (released posthumously—1999—after his death in 1988).
  • "Osage Stomp" – Bob Wills
  • "Our Heart's in Oklahoma" – honoring the victims of the 1995 Murrah Building bombing. Lyrics written by Anita Bonita; tune drawn from the song "My Home's in Alabama" by Alabama; recorded by Dave Fields.
  • "Our Lady of Oklahoma" – Peter Stampfel
  • "Outlaw Band" – Bob Childers, 1999. Co-written by Childers, Layle Stagner, and Randy Crouch. Recorded again in 2008 by Jason Boland & the Stragglers and by the Burtschi Brothers.

P

Q

  • "Queen of Oklahoma" – Patrick Bloom
  • "Queen of Oklahoma" – Carter Sampson, 2011.

R

  • "Ragtime Cowboy Joe" – Pinky Tomlin recorded this 1912 composition in 1935 and again in 1938, changing "Arizona" to "Oklahoma" as the origin of the ragtime cowboy.
  • "The Rain Don't Ever Stop in Oklahoma" – Red Steagall, 1978.[130]
  • "Ramblin' Oakie" – Written by Leodie Jackson, recorded by him and his "Western Swingsters" with vocal by Terry Fell, 1946.
  • "Ramona" – Guster
  • "Rapid Roy (The Stock Car Boy)" – Jim Croce
  • "Red Durt" – Chop Chop
  • "Red River Blue" – duet recorded by Blake Shelton and Miranda Lambert, 2011; written by Buddy Owens and Ray Stephenson.
  • "Rodeo" – Garth Brooks.
  • "Roll On Oklahoma" – Zach Swon.
  • "Rollin' " – Bill Grant and Delia Bell.
  • "Rollin' On Home for Christmas" – Written by Jim Carter and J.B. Smith, recorded by Gina Michaells, 2008.[131]
  • "Rose of Oklahoma" – written by Rose E. Black, with additional writing credits to Cowboy Copas, Chaw Mank and Lew Mel (Louis Mulé); record released with vocal by Cowboy Copas, 1948.
  • "Rough Wind in Oklahoma" – Michael Hedges, 1999.

S

  • "The Sailor and the Oklahoma Girl" – Bruce Michael Miller, co-written with Ken Forsythe.
  • "Sally Sue From Sallisaw" – written by Cindy Walker, recorded by Doye O'Dell
  • "She's a Real Gone Oakie" – written by Mary London (as "He's a Real Gone Oakie"—see above), recorded by Deuce Spriggens with the Tex Williams Western Caravan.
  • "She's An Okie" – Billy Hughes, recorded by Al Vaughn.
  • "She's Got That Oklahoma Look" – Sanger D. Shafer, recorded by Moe Bandy.
  • "Should've Spent More Time in Oklahoma" – John George Campbell.
  • "Sins of Oklahoma" – Zach Huckabee Band.
  • "Small Town Oklahoma" – Mare Wakefield
  • "Soft Winds of Oklahoma" – Bill Emerson, 1994. Banjo instrumental.
  • "Southeast Oklahoma" – Clay Edwards, 2012.
  • "Speedway Oklahoma" – Tyson Meade, leader of the Chainsaw Kittens.
  • "Storm over Oklahoma" – Byron Berline and Dan Crary, performed with John Hickman, 2002. Fiddle-guitar-banjo instrumental.
  • "Stormclouds Over Tulsa" – Written by Bryce Martin, recorded by Marada Dunn (Brymar 4453), 1984. Godot Boys Music (BMI).
  • ”Sunday in Ponca City” – written by Mike West, recorded by Truckstop Honeymoon, 2014.[132]
  • "Sweet Oklahoma" – Bill Caswell, 1980.

T

  • "T. Town Blues" – Ernie Fields and His Orchestra. Written by Fields. Vocal by Teddy Cole.
  • "T-Town Blues" – The Bays Brothers, 2004.
  • "Take Her Back to Tulsa" – Kerry Grombacher, 2001.
  • "Take Me Back to Oklahoma" – Chubby Checker, co-written with Wade Boger and Gary Nutt, 1994.
  • "Take Me Back to Oklahoma" – George Dickey, 2005.
  • "Take Me Back to Oklahoma" – Henson Cargill, written by Charles Hall, 2013.
  • "Take Me Back to Tulsa" – Bob Wills/Tommy Duncan.
  • "Taking Bob Back To Tulsa" – Gary P. Nunn.
  • "Talihina Sky" – Kings of Leon
  • "Tampa to Tulsa" – Tim O'Reagan of The Jayhawks.
  • "Tear Drops in Tulsa" – Mustang Mesa, 2000.
  • "Teardrops in Tulsa" – Jason Stringfellow Band, 2013.
  • "George Strait (2003).
  • "Ten Miles to Tulsa" – Billy & Liza (William Nershi and Elizabeth Oxnard); also recorded by the String Cheese Incident.
  • "Texas and Oklahoma – Freddy Powers.
  • "Them Tulsa Boys" – Paul Benjaman Band
  • "Tokyo, Oklahoma" – John Anderson, written by Mack Vickery, 1985.
  • "Tornado Season in Tulsa" – Emily Kaitz, 2001.[133]
  • "La Tragedia de Oklahoma" – Silvano Ramos y Ortega.
  • "Truth" – Jimmy Lafave.
  • "Tucker's Knob" – Bill Grant and Delia Bell, 2003.[134]
  • "Tulsa" – Jerry Merritt and the Crowns, 1964
  • "Tulsa" – Rufus Wainwright
  • "Tulsa" – Travis Linville and the Burtschi Brothers
  • "Tulsa" – Wayne "The Train" Hancock
  • "Tulsa Baby" – Dave Stogner, co-written with Jim Childress.
  • "Tulsa Baby" – The Miller Brothers; same song recorded by Deke Dickerson.
  • "Tulsa Ballroom" – Dottie West, written by Dewayne Blackwell and John Durrill, 1983.[135][136]
  • "Tulsa County" – Pamela Polland, writer; recorded by Anita Carter; by Ry Cooder and Taj Mahal (as a duo); by The Byrds; and by Son Volt.
  • "Tulsa Girl" – Dwight Twilley, 1976.
  • "Tulsa Girl" – The Greyhounds, 2008.
  • "Tulsa Imperative" – The Mountain Goats.
  • "Tulsa, Oklahoma – Shebang, 2003.
  • "Tulsa on a Saturday Night" – Benny Kubiak, 1975.
  • "Tulsa Queen" – Emmylou Harris and Rodney Crowell, recorded by Emmylou.
  • "Tulsa Riots" – Blue Cut.
  • "The Tulsa Shuffle" – Steve Ripley, leader of The Tractors.
  • "Tulsa Sound" – Beau Jennings.
  • "Tulsa Sounds Like Trouble to Me" – Shawn Camp, co-written with Mark Sanders, 2006.
  • "Tulsa Straight Ahead" – Jimmy Hall, fiddler and vocalist with Leon McAuliffe and His Cimarron Boys, 1947.
  • "Tulsa Sunday" – Lee Hazlewood, 2000.
  • "Tulsa Telephone Book" – Tom T. Hall; also recorded by Calexico.
  • "Tulsa Time" – written by Danny Flowers, recorded by Don Williams, Eric Clapton, Reba McEntire, among others. Flowers was the guitarist in the Williams band; the Williams and Clapton recordings were both released in 1978.
  • "Tulsa Town" — Dwight Twilley, 2011.
  • "Tulsa Turnaround" – Larry Collins and Alex Harvey, recorded by Kenny Rogers.
  • "Tulsa Twist" – Dickie McBride (1941—instrumental)
  • "Tulsa Waltz" (instrumental) – Jimmie Revard & His Oklahoma Playboys, 1937.
  • "Twenty Four Hours from Tulsa" — Gene Pitney; written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David, 1963[1]

U

V

  • "The Verdigris" – Beau Jennings, 2015.

W

  • "Waltz of the Arbuckles" — Benny Kubiak, 1975.
  • "Wanderin' Okie" – Eddie Noack, 1955.
  • "Way Back in Oklahoma" – The Jimmy Wakely Trio, written by Johnny Bond, a member of the trio, in collaboration with Eddie Dean, who sang the song in the films Driftin' River (1946) and The Tioga Kid (1948)--two movies with much of the same footage re-edited.
  • "We've Taken Bob Back to Tulsa" – R.W. Hampton with Rich O'Brien and the Enid Symphony Orchestra.
  • "West of Tulsa" – Bill Caswell, 1980.
  • "When I Can See the Wichitas" – Phil Sampson
  • "Where the Arkansas River Leaves Oklahoma" – Wayland Holyfield, recorded by Don Williams.
  • "The Wind Blows Every Day in Oklahoma" – Buck Owens, 1970.
  • "The Wind of Oklahoma" – Dallas Frazier, recorded by the Mills Brothers and by Tex Ritter.
  • "Winds of Oklahoma" – Andy Germak, 2000.

Y

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Dave Austin, Jim Peterik, Cathy Lynn (2010), Songwriting For Dummies, Hoboken, NJ: Wiley, p. 117,  
  2. ^ John Marchese, "BUCK PIZZARELLI AND HIS WEST TEXAS TUMBLEWEEDS: DIGGIN' UP BONES." Retrieved 22 January 2015. John Pizzarelli (writer and vocalist), "Ain't Oklahoma Pretty," on Diggin' Up Bones by "Buck" Pizzarelli and the West Texas Tumbleweeds, Arbors CD 19394, 2009. Archived in the Jerome Library, Bowling Green State University. The recording can be heard on YouTube.
  3. ^ Cooley, Spade, and Ike Cargill, "All Aboard for Oklahoma." New York: Hill and Range Songs, 1947. Archived in Indiana University Sheet Music Collections--DeVincent Sheet Music (Lilly Library). The recording can be heard on YouTube.
  4. ^ Hough, Brenda (2010). "Hough Review #26--The Brombies: From the Piney Hills of Hollywood". CBA News. California Bluegrass Association. Retrieved 27 May 2012.  The recording can be heard on YouTube.
  5. ^ John Fullbright (writer and performer), "All the Time in the World," From the Ground Up, Blue Dirt Records 13624-CD-0001, 2012. Archived in the Jerome Library, Bowling Green State University. The song can be heard on YouTube.
  6. ^ Leggett, Steve. "Almost to Tulsa: The Instrumentals". allmusic.com. Retrieved 29 May 2012.  The recording can be heard on YouTube.
  7. ^ "Auldridge, Mike. Eight String Swing". CD Review Digest Annual--Jazz, Popular, etc. (Voorheesville, NY: Peri Press) 7 (4): 29. 1994.  Auldridge's recording can be heard on YouTube.
  8. ^ "Tom Paxton – Wearing the Time CD". CD Universe website. Retrieved 27 May 2012.  The song can be heard on YouTube.
  9. ^ Matt Hillyer, "Anywhere I'm Loving You," Welcome to Eleven Hundred Springs 1999 CD Listed by Worldcat.org with no publisher named. The recording can be heard on YouTube.
  10. ^ Susan Herndon, “The Bad Roads of Oklahoma,” performed on her CD All Fall Down, Turtle Records, 2010. The recording can be heard on the Reverbnation website.
  11. ^ Jamie Richards, “Back in Oklahoma,” performed by him on the CD Between These Lines, D Records (Houston, TX) D9004, 2004. Archived in the University of North Texas Library. The song can be heard on a YouTube recording of a live performance by Jamie Richards.
  12. ^ Wayde Blair, “Back in Oklahoma,” appears on three compilation “Various Artists” releases by the German digital music label Rosenklang: (2006)Country Rock Vol. 1, (2007)American Folk, and (2010).Swing with Western The song also appears on the soundtrack of the video game Rig'n'Roll. It can be heard on YouTube.
  13. ^ "Ned Miller – Back To Oklahoma / I Hang My Head And Cry". Discogs.com. Retrieved 6 June 2012.  Alan O’Day, “Back to Oklahoma,” performed by Ned Miller, Ned Miller’s Back, Republic Records RLP-1304, 197-? (year uncertain). Archived in the Library of Congress. The recording can be heard on YouTube.
  14. ^ Michael Fracasso, “Back to Oklahoma,” When I Lived in the Wild Bohemia Beat CD 0003, Denver, CO, 1995. Archived in the University of California, San Diego Library. The song can be heard on YouTube.
  15. ^ McCarthy, Kevin (January 1999). "A Review of the CD "Earthlings" by Jim Layeux". Kevin and Maxine’s Celtic & Folk Music CD Reviews. Retrieved 19 September 2015.  Jim Layeux Website--retrieved 8 October 2015. The recording can be heard by clicking this link.
  16. ^ Donnie Duree, “Back to Oklahoma,” on his digital music album A Few Songs for Old Friends, LTOP Music/SongCast, 2009. Viewable and downloadable from several sites, including emusic.com. The song can be heard on YouTube.
  17. ^ Songwriters Hall of Fame: Willie Nelson. Willie Nelson and Dan Jenkins, “Baja Oklahoma,” sung by Karla Bonoff on her CD Live!, 2007. Archived in the Library of Congress. The scene from the HBO movie including the song as performed by Lesley Ann Warren and Willie Nelson can be seen on YouTube.
  18. ^ Beth Elliott, "Ballad of the Oklahoma Women's Liberation Front" on her self-released 2005 CD, Buried Treasure. The compact disk includes material Elliott originally recorded and released on a 1976 LP entitled Kid, Have You Rehabilitated Yourself. Buried Treasure is catalogued by WorldCat.org. The song can be heard on YouTube. (Parental advisory: Lyrics)
  19. ^ Ulrich Jonas, Peter Power and Rolf Soja, "Beim alten Bill in Oklahoma," sung by Heino on his 45 rpm single (006-45 376), issued by EMI Electrola, 1979. The song appeared that same year on Heino's self-titled two-LP set of 33 1/3 rpm records released by Hörzu-Langspielplatte in Hamburg, which is archived in the Deutsche Nationalbibliothek. The recording can be heard on YouTube.
  20. ^ Thompson, Hank, and William Penix, "Big Boat Across Oklahoma," Hank Thompson Salutes Oklahoma, performed by Hank Thompson, Dot 25971, LP. 33 1/3 rpm, 1969. Archived in the Briscoe Center for American History Townsend Miller Collection, University of Texas--Austin and at the Bowling Green State University Library. The recording can be heard on YouTube.
  21. ^ Bill Grant, “Big Cedar,” performed by Bill Grant and Delia Bell on their eponymous LP, Rebel Records REB-1593, 1980. Archived in the Fine Arts Library, University of Texas at Austin. The recording can be heard by clicking this link.
  22. ^ Josh Kear and Chris Tompkins, “Blown Away,” performed by Carrie Underwood on the CD Blown Away, Arista Nashville, 2012. Archived in the Library of Congress. Writing credits and more information can be seen at allmusic.com. Retrieved 7 October 2015. The recording can be heard on YouTube.
  23. ^ Virgel Bozman, "Blues for Oklahoma," 10-inch 78 rpm single, #109-A, Oklahoma Tornado Recording Company, Westlake, Louisiana, 1950. “Virgel Bozman – Blues For Oklahoma” on discogs.com. Retrieved 7 October 2015. The song has also been anthologized on the 1982 12-inch 33 1/3 rpm LP, Aaaahhhh Rock-a-billy (Rotterdam, Holland: White Label WL 8821), which is archived in the Library of Congress. The recording can be heard on YouTube.
  24. ^ Steagall, Red, "Bob's Got a Swing Band in Heaven," Hang On Feelin' , ABC Records AB-1051, 33 1/3 rpm LP, 1978. Archived in the Briscoe Center for American History Townsend Miller Collection, University of Texas at Austin and in the Nichols Library Marr Sound Archives, University of Missouri—Kansas City. The recording can be heard on YouTube.
  25. ^ Adam Selzer, “Border Oklahoma,” performed by Norfolk & Western on the CD Centralia, 2001. “Norfolk & Western – Centralia” on allmusic.com. Retrieved 7 October 2015. The song can be heard on YouTube.
  26. ^ Willis Allen Ramsey, “Boy from Oklahoma,” on his self-titled 33 1/3 rpm LP, Shelter Records SW-8914, 1972. Archived in the Bowling Green State University Library. The recording can be heard on YouTube.
  27. ^ Gene Collier, "Boys from Oklahoma,” performed by Cross Canadian Ragweed, Live at Billy Bob's Texas, 4¾-inch digital sound disk, Smith Music Group, Fort Worth, TX, 2002. Archived in the Library of Congress. Writing credit documented at Repertoire.BMI.com. The song can be heard on YouTube.
  28. ^ Frazier, Dallas, and Earl Montgomery, "California Cotton Fields," recorded by Merle Haggard and the Strangers, Someday We'll Look Back, Capitol ST-835, 33 1/3-rpm 12-inch LP record, 1971. Archived in the Briscoe Center for American History Ed Ward Collection, University of Texas—Austin. On this LP the song title shows “Cottonfields” as one word, but the composition is registered with BMI as "California Cotton Fields" and this is how it appears on four of the eight different artists' recordings of the song. All web sources retrieved 9 October 2015. The Merle Haggard recording can be heard on YouTube.
  29. ^ Farrell, Kevin “Blackie,” "California Okie," performed by Commander Cody and His Lost Planet Airmen on the self-titled album, Warner Brothers BS 2847, 1975 (33 1/3-rpm 12-inch LP). Archived in the Briscoe Center for American History, University of Texas–Austin and the Bowling Green State University Library. The recording can be heard on YouTube.
  30. ^ Jones, Robert John, "California Okie," performed by Buck Owens, Warner Bros. WBS 8255, 7-inch 45-rpm record, 1976. 45cat.com. Retrieved 9 October 2015. Also released with a spelling variant, “California Oakie,” on a 12-inch 33 1/3-rpm LP: Buck Owens, Buck 'em, Warner Bros. BS 2952, 1976. Archived in the Briscoe Center for American History Townsend Miller Collection, University of Texas–Austin and in the Bowling Green State University Library. The BMI repertoire page shows Robert John Jones as the songwriter and the spelling as “Okie” and then clicking on the song title shows the songwriter as “Rocky Topp”--whose 149 registered works are identical to those of Robert John Jones. Repertoire.bmi.com retrieved 9 October 2015. The recording can be heard on YouTube.
  31. ^ Betty Overstreet, "California Okies," on her CD What Would You Do (if You Had A Choice), 2007. (Other sources list the release date as 2008. The recording can be heard on YouTube.
  32. ^ Young, William and Nancy (2008). Music of the World War II Era. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press. p. 166.   All recordings of the song are listed by secondhandsongs.com. Retrieved 10 October 2015. At least three renditions of it can be heard on YouTube: by Bob Wills, by Merle Haggard and by Asleep at the Wheel.
  33. ^ Spencer, Glenn, and Tim Spencer, “Cherokee Strip,” performed by Bob Beckham, Monument 45-1018, 7-inch 45-rpm record, 1967. 45cat.com. Retrieved 10 October 2015. Sons Of The Pioneers, The Legendary Sons Of The Pioneers Vol. 4 (1955-1959), Cattle (Sulzheim, West Germany), 12-inch 33 1/3-rpm LP, 1983. Archived in the Bowling Green State University Library. The filmed performance of the song in The Durango Kid can be seen on YouTube. The Bob Beckham recording can also be found on YouTube.
  34. ^ Repertoire.BMI.com lists the four writers. Charley Austin sings "Chickasha City" on his self-titled CD, listed on CDBaby, 2008. A recording of the song by co-composer Kris Bergsnes can be heard at soundcloud.com. Charley Austin's recording can be heard on YouTube. All websites retrieved 11 October 2015.
  35. ^ James McMurtry, writer and performer, “Choctaw Bingo,” Saint Mary of the Woods, Durham, NC: Sugar Hill Records, SUG-CD-1071, 2002. Archived in the Library of Congress.   , April 28, 2010.Charleston City PaperLawrence, Stratton, “James McMurtry's Gritty Perspective,” Retrieved 11 October 2015. McMurtry's song also was performed by Ray Wylie Hubbard on his CD Delirium Tremolos, Cambridge, MA: Philo, 2005. Catalogued by worldcat.org. Youtube has both singers' renditions of the song, James McMurtry and Ray Wylie Hubbard.
  36. ^ Wyer, Brian, singer-songwriter, "Chouteau, Oklahoma," on his self-titled album, cdbaby.com, 2008. Retrieved 12 October 2015. The recording can be heard on YouTube.
  37. ^ Bogdanov, Vladimir; Chris Woodstra; Stephen Thomas Erlewine (2003). All Music Guide to Country: The Definitive Guide to Country Music. San Francisco: Backbeat Books. p. 75.   Viewable at books.google.com. “Story Behind the Song: Cimarron (Roll On), by Johnny Bond,” CountryMusicTreasures.com. Retrieved 12 October 2015. The song can be heard on YouTube.
  38. ^ Smith, Al, "Crazy About Oklahoma," Soulin' , performed by Jimmy Reed, Bluesway 6009, 12-inch 33 1/3-rpm LP record, 1967. Archived at the Bowling Green State University Library. Earlier in 1967 the song had been released as “Crazy 'Bout Oklahoma,” Exodus Records, 7-inch 45-rpm record with two catalog numbers: EX-1012 and EX-2008. discogs.com. Retrieved 11 October 2015. Romano, Will (2006). Big Boss Man: The Life and Music of Jimmy Reed. San Francisco: Backbeat Books. p. 205.   The recording can be heard on YouTube.
  39. ^   Steve Diamond and Mark D. Sanders, "The Day That She Left Tulsa (in a Chevy)," Columbia C-78745, 7-inch 45-rpm record, 1997. 45cat.com Retrieved 14 October 2015. Also issued as a Compact Disk single, Columbia CD-6842, 1997. Archived in the Southern Folklife Collection at the University of North Carolina Library. The song also is included on the Wade Hayes album When the Wrong One Loves You Right, Columbia CK 68037, 1998. Catalogued at worldcat.org. The recording can be heard on YouTube.
  40. ^ La Chapelle, Peter (2007). Proud to Be an Okie: Cultural Politics, Country Music, and Migration to Southern California. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press. pp. 91–92.   The writing of the song was begun by Sooter, then finished and arranged by O’Dell. Allmusic.com biography of Doye O’Dell and of Rudy Sooter by Eugene Chadbourne. Retrieved 4 October 2015. O’Dell’s recording can be heard on YouTube.
  41. ^ Lanegan, Mark, writer and performer, "Death Trip to Tulsa," on his album Phantom Radio, Vagrant Records, 2014, 4¾-inch digital audio disk. Catalogued at worldcat.org. The recording can be heard on YouTube.
  42. ^ Jana Jae, "The Devil Went on to Tulsa,” on her album The Devil You Say, Lark LRS-801, 1979 (date not certain), 12-inch 33 1/3-rpm LP record. Archived in the Bowling Green State University Library. The recording can be heard on YouTube.
  43. ^ McEntire, Reba, and Ronnie Dunn, writers and singers, "Does the Wind Still Blow in Oklahoma?" Reba: Duets, MCA Nashville Records B0008903-02, 2007. 4¾-inch digital audio disk. Archived in the Library of Congress. The recording can be heard on YouTube.
  44. ^   Wayne Carson Thompson, “(Don't Let the Sun Set on You) Tulsa,” performed by Waylon Jennings, RCA Victor 47-9925, 1970, 7-inch 45-rpm record. “Songs of Wayne Carson Thompson”. Retrieved 18 September 2014. 45cat.com. Retrieved 15 October 2015. Recordings can be heard on YouTube: by Waylon Jennings and the original by Wayne Carson.
  45. ^ Cook, Don, "Don't Make Me Come to Tulsa," performed by Wade Hayes, Old Enough to Know Better, Columbia CK 66412, 1994. 4¾-inch digital audio disk. Archived in the Vanderbilt University Library. The song can be heard on YouTube.
  46. ^ White, Lee “Lasses,” “Down in Oklahoma,” performed by Ginger Prince. Kaybee 2424, 1949? 10-inch 78 rpm record. Archived in the Stanford University Library. The recording can be heard on YouTube.
  47. ^ February 2, 2008, on publicradio.org.Weekend America,“The Mountain Goats Do Super Tuesday,” The web page includes the song lyrics, and audio of the entire 44-minute program. Retrieved 16 October 2015. To hear just the song and John Darnielle's explanation of it, click on this link.
  48. ^   A recording of Woody Guthrie singing the song can be heard on YouTube.
  49. ^ Cleto, Ramiro, ”En un Carril de Oklahoma,” performed by Vagon Chicano, El Breve Espacio, Universal Music, 2006. 4¾-inch digital audio disk. Archived in the Library of Congress. Writing credit at Allmusic.com. Retrieved 16 October 2015. The recording can be heard on YouTube.
  50. ^ Moreland, John, "Endless Oklahoma Sky,” performed by John Moreland and the Black Gold Band on their CD of the same title, Little Mafia Records, LM062, 2008. discogs.com. Writing credit documented at repertoire.bmi.com: Endless Oklahoma Sky. Retrieved 17 October 2015. The recording can be heard on YouTube.
  51. ^ Fielder, Brad, writer and singer, "Enid, Oklahoma," Unabashed Homages, digital album, 2010, available at bradfielder.bandcamp.com. Retrieved 18 October 2015. The recording can be heard by clicking this link.
  52. ^ Hanson, Patricia King; Amy Dunkleberger, eds. (1999). American Film Institute Catalog of Motion Pictures Produced in the United States. F4, Feature Films 1941-1950. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press. pp. 1072–1073.   The song as recorded by the Sons of the Pioneers can be heard on YouTube.
  53. ^ Harral, Hank, writer and singer, "Fabulous Oklahoma," Caprock 45x100, 1957. 7-inch 45-rpm record. 45cat.com. Retrieved 18 October 2015. LoneStarStomp.com: Hank Harral, Big Spring. Retrieved 18 October 2015. The recording can be heard on YouTube.
  54. ^ Terry Stafford Suspicion! Home Page. Retrieved 19 October 2015. Stafford, Terry, singer-songwriter, "Falling (It's a Long Long Way From Hollis, Oklahoma),” Player International PI-134, 1989. 7-inch 45-rpm record.
  55. ^ Jacobs, Greg, singer-songwriter, "Farmer's Luck," Reclining with Age, Baton Rouge, La.: Binky Records, 2001. 4¾-inch digital audio disk. Catalogued by WorldCat.org. Also recorded by Jason Boland and the Stragglers on their CD Rancho Alto, Apex, 2011. Catalogued by WorldCat.org. On YouTube can be seen a video of composer Greg Jacobs performing his song live and also a video with the Jason Boland recording.
  56. ^ Harris, Brandon L., “Fire Eyed Woman from Oklahoma,” performed by the Franklin Brothers. Mercury 73088, 1970, 7-inch 45 rpm record. Writing credit also documented at repertoire.bmi.com. Retrieved 20 October 2015. A one-minute excerpt from the recording can be heard by clicking this link.
  57. ^ Thrasher, Neil, and Michael Dulaney, “Fly Over States,” performed by Jason Aldean, My Kinda Party, Nashville, TN: Broken Bow Records 005648, 2010. 4¾-inch digital audio disk. Archived in the Library of Congress. The recording can be heard on YouTube.
  58. ^ Praguefrank's Country Music Discographies: Jack Guthrie. Retrieved 20 October 2015. Song released on Jack Guthrie, Oklahoma Hills, Vollersode, Germany: Bear Family BCD-15580, 1991. 4¾-inch digital audio disk. Archived in the Library of Congress. More details can be found at the coverlib.com images of the album liner notes, as well as allmusic.com and folkarchive.de. The recording can be heard by clicking this link.
  59. ^ (Tom) Rascal and (Chester) McLane, "Freedom, Oklahoma," on their 2006 German CD Honky Tonk of Life. From their website, www.rascal-and-mclane.de. Retrieved 20 October 2015. The song can be heard in a live perfomance by the duo in this Video on YouTube.
  60. ^ Hobbs, Becky, singer-songwriter, "From Oklahoma with Love," on the CD of the same name, Roswell, GA: Platinum Entertainment/Beckaroo Records, 1998. allmusic.com. Archived in the Bowling Green State University Library. The recording can be heard on YouTube.
  61. ^ Wray, Link, and Steve Verroca, "From Tulsa to North Carolina," performed by Link Wray and band, Beans and Fatback, Virgin Records, 1973. 12-inch 33 1/3-rpm LP record. Archived in the Bowling Green State University Library. The recording can be heard on YouTube.
  62. ^ Brown, Junior, singer-songwriter, "The Gal from Oklahoma," Guit with It, Curb Records D2-77622, 1993. 4¾-inch digital audio disk. Archived in the Library of Congress. The song can be heard on YouTube.
  63. ^ Jennings, Beau, singer-songwriter, "Girl from Oklahoma,” Holy Tulsa Thunder, 4¾-inch digital audio disk and digital download album, 2008. Album information available from beaujennings.bandcamp.com. Retrieved 23 October 2015. The recording can be heard on YouTube.
  64. ^ From the album Feel the Steel, 2009.
  65. ^ McCoy, Billy, "The Girl in Oklahoma," performed by Tracey K. Houston, I'm Not the Same Girl, Songbird Productions, 2000. 4¾-inch digital audio disk. Album information at CDBaby.com. Songwriter credit at TKHouston.com. Retrieved 24 October 2015. The recording can be heard on YouTube.
  66. ^ Allen, Terry, singer-songwriter, “The Girl Who Danced Oklahoma,” Lubbock (On Everything), Chicago, Ill.: Fate Records, 1978. 12-inch 33 1/3-rpm LP record. Archived in the Briscoe Center for American History Ed Ward Collection, University of Texas–Austin. The recording can be heard on YouTube.
  67. ^ Pitts, Michael R; Frank W Hoffmann (2002). The Rise of the Crooners : Gene Austin, Russ Columbo, Bing Crosby, Nick Lucas, Johnny Marvin, and Rudy Vallee. Lanham, Md.: Scarecrow Press. pp. 233–234.   Gene Austin discography from the Pitts-Hoffmann book. Austin, Gene, singer-songwriter, ”Give Me a Home in Oklahoma,” Universal U-131, 10-inch 78-rpm record, 1947. Song included on the album Gene Austin and His Lonesome Road, Cincinnati, Ohio: Fraternity, (1957?), 12-inch 33 1/3-rpm LP record. Archived in the Bowling Green State University Library. A 90-second clip of the recording can be heard by clicking on this link.
  68. ^ West, Mike, singer-songwriter, "God Is Down in Oklahoma," Home, Binky Records 1026, 2000. 4¾-inch digital audio disk. Archived in the Bowling Green State University Library. More information about the song and about Mike West can be found at allmusic.com. Retrieved 25 October 2015. The recording can be heard by clicking on this link.
  69. ^ McBride, Justin, Philip O’Donnell and Wynn Varble, "God's in Oklahoma Today,” preformed by Justin McBride, Don't Let Go, J. McBride Records, 2008. 4¾-inch digital audio disk. Archived in the Library of Congress.  Writer credit documented at repertoire.bmi.com. Retrieved 25 October 2015. The recording can be heard on YouTube.
  70. ^ Meduza, Eddie (pseud.; Errol Norstedt), "Goin' Back to Oklahoma," Eddie Meduza & The Roarin' Cadillacs, Sweden: CBS 83500, 1979. 12-inch 33 1/3 LP record. Album documented on discogs.com. Retrieved 25 October 2015. His recording on YouTube has been blocked in the United States and some other countries. As an alternative, the song as performed by an amateur musician in his own video can be heard here.
  71. ^ Bryden, Bob, "Goin' to Oklahoma," performed by Christmas, Heritage, Toronto: Daffodil Records SBA-16002, 1970. 12-inch 33 1/3 LP record. Album documented on discogs.com. Retrieved 25 October 2015. Writer credit documented at repertoire.bmi.com. Retrieved 25 October 2015. Description of the musical group Christmas at allmusic.com. The recording can be heard on YouTube.
  72. ^ Kaitz, Emily, singer-songwriter, "Going Back to Oklahoma," Yuppie Scum, Fayetteville, AR: Pingleblobber Music, 1998. 4¾-inch digital audio disk. Album information at cdbaby.com. More information about Emily Kaitz can be found at arkansasarts.org. Retrieved 26 October 2015. The recording can be heard on YouTube.
  73. ^ Daniels, C. E., “Going Out to Tulsa,” performed by Johnny Seay, Columbia 4-44423, 7-inch 45-rpm record, 1968. 45cat.com. Retrieved 19 September 2015. Cusic, Don (2011). The Cowboy in Country Music : An Historical Survey with Artist Profiles. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland. p. 241.   Book archived in the Library of Congress.
  74. ^ "JD McPherson and Pokey LaFarge Cover a Bob Wills Classic," Oklahoma Rock News, July 1, 2013, a web journal. Retrieved 20 August 2013.
  75. ^ Don Reed and Dan Franklin, "(Gotta Get To) Oklahoma City," performed by Luke Wills' Rhythm Busters, RCA Victor 20-2014-A, 78-rpm record. 45worlds.com/78rpm/record/202414. Retrieved 25 May 2015.
  76. ^ Thompson, Hank, "Guthrie," Hank Thompson Salutes Oklahoma, performed by Hank Thompson, Dot 25971, LP. 33 1/3 rpm, 1969. Archived in the Briscoe Center for American History Townsend Miller Collection, University of Texas--Austin and at the Bowling Green State University Library.
  77. ^ Thompson, Hank, and William Penix, "Happy, Oklahoma," Hank Thompson Salutes Oklahoma, performed by Hank Thompson, Dot 25971, LP. 33 1/3 rpm, 1969. Archived in the Briscoe Center for American History Townsend Miller Collection, University of Texas--Austin and at the Bowling Green State University Library.
  78. ^ London, Mary, "He's a Real Gone Oakie," performed by Cliffie Stone and His Orchestra with vocalist Judy Hayden, Capitol 15157, 78 rpm record, 1948. Archived in the Nichols Library Marr Sound Archives, University of Missouri Kansas City.
  79. ^ Glazer, Tom, "Home Sweet Oklahoma," performed by Roy Rogers. RCA Victor 20-4424, 10-inch 78-rpm record and RCA Victor 47-4424, 7-inch 45-rpm record, both 1951.
  80. ^ , February 3, 1952, Bridgeport, Connecticut, p. 14Sunday Herald"Roy Rogers Now Cowboy in Conn.," .
  81. ^ Russell, Leon, "Home Sweet Oklahoma." Shelter 7302 7-inch 45 rpm record, 1970. 45cat.com. Retrieved 18 July 2012.
  82. ^ , Flying Fish Records CD #70574, 1991.It Ain't EasyPaxton, Tom, "Home Sweet Oklahoma," Allmusic.com. Retrieved 18 July 2012.
  83. ^ Curb CD #79222, 2008.Best Country SongsHewitt, Ted, and Kris Bergsnes, "Home Sweet Oklahoma," performed by Patti Page and Vince Gill, Allmusic.com. Retrieved 18 July 2012.
  84. ^ Thompson, Hank, and William Penix, "Homesick, Lonesome, Hillbilly Okie," Hank Thompson Salutes Oklahoma, performed by Hank Thompson, Dot 25971, LP. 33 1/3 rpm, 1969. Archived in the Briscoe Center for American History Townsend Miller Collection, University of Texas--Austin and at the Bowling Green State University Library.
  85. ^ Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and CultureOklahoma Historical Society, "Semicentennial of Statehood," . Retrieved 18 July 2012.
  86. ^ Skinner, Frank, Al Skinner and Alan Clark, "I'll See You in Oklahoma," performed by George Cates, Coral 61825, 7-inch 45 rpm record, 1957.
  87. ^ "Official State Semi-Centennial Song Introduced," Ada (OK) Evening News, April 25, 1957, p. 14. Archived by newspaperarchive.com. Retrieved 19 August 2013.
  88. ^ Van Elstyne, Egbert, and Harry Williams, "I'm Goin' Back to Oklahoma." New York: Jerome H. Remick & Co., 1912. Archived in Indiana University Sheet Music Collections--DeVincent Sheet Music (Lilly Library).
  89. ^ "Record Details". 45cat.com. Retrieved 6 June 2012. 
  90. ^ Tomlin, Pinky, "In Ole Oklahoma." New York : Santly-Joy-Select, 1938.
  91. ^ Tomlin, Pinky; Lynette Wert (1981). The Object of My Affection: An Autobiography. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press. p. 148.  ; "Yi-Yi's Have It; Tomlin's Song Wins," The Oklahoman, August 2, 1938, Section 1, pp. 1, 2.
  92. ^ Young, Neil, "Last Trip to Tulsa," Neil Young, Reprise RS 6317, 33 1/3 rpm LP, 1968. Archived in the Library of Congress.
  93. ^ Cooley, Spade, and Smokey Rogers, "My Chickashay Gal." New York: Hill and Range Songs, 1945. Archived in Indiana University Sheet Music Collections--DeVincent Sheet Music (Lilly Library)
  94. ^  ;  Roy Rogers (performer), "My Chickashay Gal," written by Spade Cooley and Smokey Rogers. RCA Victor 20-2124, 1947, 78 rpm record.
  95. ^ This was the first self-penned song recorded by Gene Autry.  George-Warren, Holly (2007). Public Cowboy #1: The Life and Times of Gene Autry. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press. p. 47.  
  96. ^ Savage, William W., Jr. (1983). Singing Cowboys and All that Jazz: A Short History of Popular Music in Oklahoma. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press. p. 144. 
  97. ^ "Bobby Bond copyright filings". faqs.org. Retrieved 9 June 2012. 
  98. ^ Thompson, Hank, "O-k-l-a-h-o-m-a," Hank Thompson Salutes Oklahoma, performed by Hank Thompson, Dot 25971, LP. 33 1/3 rpm, 1969. Archived in the Briscoe Center for American History Townsend Miller Collection, University of Texas--Austin and at the Bowling Green State University Library.
  99. ^  ; "Record Details." 45.com. Retrieved 19 July 2012.
  100. ^ La Chapelle, Peter (2007). Proud to Be an Okie: Cultural Politics, Country Music, and Migration to Southern California. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press. pp. 180–207.    La Chapelle devotes an entire chapter of his book to analyzing the writing and performance of, and audience responses to, "Okie from Muskogee."
  101. ^ "Record Details". 45cat.com. Retrieved 9 June 2012. 
  102. ^ David Gates, "The Okie Surfer." Del-Fi Records 4254, 1964, 45 rpm record.
  103. ^ La Chapelle, Peter (2007). Proud to Be an Okie: Cultural Politics, Country Music, and Migration to Southern California. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press. p. 130.  
  104. ^  
  105. ^ at Discogs.comUpp Till DansLasse Stefanz, . Retrieved 5 October 2015.
  106. ^ Okla. Stat. Title 2594.1, p. 101, § 2 (Official state song), 1953.
  107. ^ Russell, Tony; Bob Pinson (2004). Country Music Records: A Discography, 1921-1942. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press. p. 597.  
  108. ^ This was the best-selling recording of Frankie Marvin's career. George-Warren, Holly (2007). Public Cowboy #1: The Life and Times of Gene Autry. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press. p. 54.  
  109. ^ Cooley, Donnell C. "Spade". Spade Cooley's Western Swing Song Folio. Beverly Hills, Calif: Hill and Range Songs (1945). Archived in the San Francisco Public Library.
  110. ^ Bob Livingston, John Hadley, and Susan Herndon, “Oklahoma Girl,” performed by Susan Herndon on the CD ‘’All Fall Down,’’ Turtle Records, 2010. The recording can be heard on YouTube.
  111. ^ Okla. Stat. Title 25-94.8, c. 47, § 1 (Official state folk song), 2001.
  112. ^ Thompson, Hank, and William Penix, "Oklahoma Home Brew," Hank Thompson Salutes Oklahoma, performed by Hank Thompson, Dot 25971, LP. 33 1/3 rpm, 1969. Archived in the Briscoe Center for American History Townsend Miller Collection, University of Texas--Austin and at the Bowling Green State University Library.
  113. ^ Williford, Opal Harrison, "Oklahoma, I Love You," arranged by Clarence Woods. Sheet music published by Sublette Music Publishing, Tulsa, Oklahoma, 1938. Archived in the Western History Collection of the University of Oklahoma Libraries.
  114. ^ "Oklahoma Indian Jazz," National Jukebox, Library of Congress. Audible sound file derived from Victor 19257 10-inch 78 rpm record. Retrieved 19 July 2012.
  115. ^ Hibbeler, Johnsen, Barna, Guarani, and Murrin, "Oklahoma Indian Jazz" (sheet music). New York: Joe Morris Music Co., 1923. Archived in the DeVincent Sheet Music Collection of Lilly Library, Indiana University.
  116. ^ Hank Harral, "Oklahoma Land." Caprock 114, 1959, 45 rpm record.
  117. ^ Russell, Tony; Bob Pinson (2004). Country Music Records: A Discography, 1921-1942. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press. p. 599.  .  Marvin, Frankie, and Joe Marvin, "Oklahoma, Land of the Sunny West." Performed by Frankie Marvin. The Golden Age of Frankie Marvin, Cattle Compact CCD 239, 2000, transcribed from the original 1929 78 rpm record.
  118. ^ Okla. Stat. title §25-94.5 (Official state children's song), 1996.
  119. ^ Steagall, Red, "Oklahoma Promise," Party Dolls and Wine, Capitol ST-11056, 33 1/3 rpm LP, 1972. Archived in the Library of Congress.
  120. ^ Durrill, John Robert, "Oklahoma Superstar," recorded by Brenda Lee, L.A. Sessions, MCA Records MCA-2233, 33 1/3 rpm LP, 1976. Archived in the Library of Congress.
  121. ^ Johnson, Peggy, and Johnnie Lee Wills, "Oklahoma, That's for Me," performed by Johnnie Lee Wills and His Boys, Bullet 726-A, 78-rpm record, Nashville, 1951. Sheet music published by Bob Wills Music/Hill and Range Songs, Beverly Hills, California, 1951. Sheet music archived at the University of North Texas Library. Also listed in the on-line Copyright Encyclopedia. Retrieved 9 December 2013.
  122. ^ Walker, Cindy, and Spade Cooley, "Oklahoma Waltz." New York: Hill and Range Songs, 1948.   Archived in the Bowling Green State University Library.
  123. ^ Praguefrank's Country Music Discographies: Spade Cooley. Accessed 27 June 2012.
  124. ^  
  125. ^ Jan-June 3D Ser Vol 30 Pt 5 Sec 2 (Volume Catalog of Copyright Entries 3D Ser Vol 30 Pt 5 Sec 2), p. 325Catalog of Copyright Entries (1976) MusicLibrary of Congress. Copyright Office. .
  126. ^ Kenton (writer), "Oklahoma Waltz," vocal by Johnny Bond and Dick Reinhart, Columbia 38160, 1948. 10-inch 78 rpm record.
  127. ^ , Florence (Alabama), April 15, 1982, p. 12.Florence Times-Tri-City Daily"'Oklahoma Wind' Named State's Waltz,"
  128. ^ Smith, Dale J., "Oklahoma Wind."
  129. ^ Miller, Roger, "Oklahoma Woman," Off the Wall, Windsong BHL1-2337, 33 1/3 rpm LP, 1977. Archived in the Library of Congress.
  130. ^ Steagall, Red, "The Rain Don't Ever Stop in Oklahoma," Hang On Feelin' , ABC Records AB-1051, 33 1/3 rpm LP, 1978. Archived in the Briscoe Center for American History Townsend Miller Collection, University of Texas at Austin and in the Nichols Library Marr Sound Archives, University of Missouri—Kansas City.
  131. ^ , November 23, 2008Lonnie Ratliff Country Music Newsletter. Retrieved 1 August 2013.
  132. ^ West, Mike, ”Sunday in Ponca City,” performed by Truckstop Honeymoon (Mike and Katie West), The Madness of Happiness, Squirrel Records, 2014. 4¾-inch digital audio disk. Album information at cdbaby.com. The recording can be heard on YouTube.
  133. ^ "Twang Twang Twang". CDBaby. Retrieved 19 June 2012. 
  134. ^ Grant, Bill, "Tucker's Knob," performed by Delia Bell and Bill Grant, We're Not the Jet Set, Old Homestead Records CD, 2003. Archived in the San Diego State University Library.
  135. ^ "Dottie West: Tulsa ballroom". lyricsvault.net. Retrieved 19 June 2012. 
  136. ^  
  137. ^ Stimeling, Travis D. (2011). Cosmic Cowboys and New Hicks: The Countercultural Sounds of Austin's Progressive Country Music Scene. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 66–69.  

External links

  • – Bear Family RecordsGreetings From Oklahoma
  • YouTube Playlist "Songs about Oklahoma"
  • YouTube Playlist "Songs about Oklahoma, continued"
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