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List of lumbar nerves

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List of lumbar nerves

Lumbar nerves
Plan of lumbar plexus.
Details
Latin nervi lumbales
Dorlands
/Elsevier
n_05/12566109
Anatomical terms of neuroanatomy

The lumbar nerves are the five pairs of spinal nerves emerging from the lumbar vertebrae. They are divided into posterior and anterior divisions.

Contents

  • Structure 1
    • Posterior divisions 1.1
    • Anterior divisions 1.2
  • Divisions 2
    • First lumbar nerve 2.1
    • Second lumbar nerve 2.2
    • Third lumbar nerve 2.3
    • Fourth lumbar nerve 2.4
    • Fifth lumbar nerve 2.5
  • Function 3
  • Additional images 4
  • See also 5
  • References 6

Structure

The lumbar nerves are spinal nerves which arise from either side of the spinal cord. The lumbar spinal nerves arise from the spinal cord between each pair of spinal vertebrae and travel through the intervertebral foramen. The nerves then split into an anterior branch, which travels forward, and a posterior branch, which travels backwards and supplies the area of the back.

Posterior divisions

The middle divisions of the posterior branches run close to the articular processes of the vertebrae and end in the multifidus muscle. The outer branches supply the erector spinae muscles.

The upper three spinal nerves give off branches to the skin. These pierce the aponeurosis of the latissimus dorsi at the lateral border of the erector spine muscles, and descend across the posterior part of the iliac crest to the skin of the buttock, some of their twigs running as far as the level of the greater trochanter.

Anterior divisions

The anterior divisions of the lumbar nerves (Latin: rami anteriores) increase in size from above downward.

The anterior divisions communicate with the sympathetic trunk. Near the origin of the divisions, they are joined by gray rami communicantes from the lumbar ganglia of the sympathetic trunk. These rami consist of long, slender branches which accompany the lumbar arteries around the sides of the vertebral bodies, beneath the Psoas major. Their arrangement is somewhat irregular: one ganglion may give rami to two lumbar nerves, or one lfumbar nerve may receive rami from two ganglia. The first and second, and sometimes the third and fourth lumbar nerves are each connected with the lumbar part of the sympathetic trunk by a white ramus communicans.

The nerves pass obliquely outward behind the Psoas major, or between its fasciculi, distributing filaments to it and the Quadratus lumborum.

As the nerves travel forward, they create nervous plexi. The first three lumbar nerves, and the greater part of the fourth together form the lumbar plexus. The smaller part of the fourth joins with the fifth to form the lumbosacral trunk, which assists in the formation of the sacral plexus.

The fourth nerve is named the nervus furcalis, from the fact that it is subdivided between the two plexuses.

Divisions

First lumbar nerve

The first lumbar spinal nerve (L1)[1] originates from the spinal column from below the lumbar vertebra 1 (L1). The two terminal branches of this nerve is the iliohypogastric and the ilioinguinal nerves

L1 supplies many muscles, either directly or through nerves originating from L1. They may be innervated with L1 as single origin, or be innervated partly by L1 and partly by other spinal nerves. The muscles are:

Second lumbar nerve

The second lumbar spinal nerve (L2)[2] originates from the spinal column from below the lumbar vertebra 2 (L2).

L2 supplies many muscles, either directly or through nerves originating from L2. They may be innervated with L2 as single origin, or be innervated partly by L2 and partly by other spinal nerves. The muscles are:

Third lumbar nerve

The third lumbar spinal nerve (L3)[3] originates from the spinal column from below the lumbar vertebra 3 (L3).

L3 supplies many muscles, either directly or through nerves originating from L3. They may be innervated with L3 as single origin, or be innervated partly by L3 and partly by other spinal nerves. The muscles are:

Fourth lumbar nerve

The fourth lumbar spinal nerve (L4)[4] originates from the spinal column from below the lumbar vertebra 4 (L4).

L4 supplies many muscles, either directly or through nerves originating from L4. They are not innervated with L4 as single origin, but partly by L4 and partly by other spinal nerves. The muscles are:

Fifth lumbar nerve

The fifth lumbar spinal nerve 5 (L5)[5] originates from the spinal column from below the lumbar vertebra 5 (L5).

L5 supplies many muscles, either directly or through nerves originating from L5. They are not innervated with L5 as single origin, but partly by L5 and partly by other spinal nerves. The muscles are:

Function

Additional images

See also

References

This article incorporates text in the public domain from the 20th edition of Gray's Anatomy (1918)

  1. ^ American Medical Association Nervous System -- Groups of Nerves
  2. ^ American Medical Association Nervous System -- Groups of Nerves
  3. ^ American Medical Association Nervous System -- Groups of Nerves
  4. ^ American Medical Association Nervous System -- Groups of Nerves
  5. ^ American Medical Association Nervous System -- Groups of Nerves

Hsu, Philip S., MD, Carmel Armon, MD, and Kerry Levin, MD. "Lumbosacral Radiculopathy: Pathophysiology.Clinical, Features, and Diagnosis." www.uptodate.com. Uptodate, 11 Jan. 2011.Web. 26 Sept. 2012. http://www.physiologie.uni-mainz.de/physio/mittmann/ThalFallZ3.pdf.

Loizidez, Alexander, MD, Siegfried Peer, MD, Michaela Plaikner, MD, Verena Spiss, MD, and HannesGruber, MD. "Ultrasound-guided Injections in the Lumbar Spine." www.medultrason.ro. Medical Ultrasonography, 20 Jan. 2011. Web. 26 Sept. 2012. http://www.medultrason.ro/assets/Magazines/Medultrason-2011-vol13-no1/10loizides.pdf

Zhu, Jie, MD, and Obi Onyewu, MD. "Alternative Approach for Lumbar Transforaminal Epidural Steroid Injections." www.painphysicianjournal.com. Pain Physician, 21 Apr. 2011. Web. 26 Sept. 2012. http://www.painphysicianjournal.com/2011/july/2011;14;331-341.pdf


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