World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Ma Fuxing

Article Id: WHEBN0027734227
Reproduction Date:

Title: Ma Fuxing  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Ma Shaowu, Boxer Rebellion, Chinese Muslim generals, Xinjiang clique, Xinhai Revolution in Xinjiang
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Ma Fuxing

Ma Fuxing
馬福興
Tao-yin of Kashgar
In office
1916–1924
Succeeded by Ma Shaowu
Personal details
Born 1864
Yunnan
Died 1924
Kashgar, Xinjiang
Nationality Chinese Muslim
Political party Xinjiang clique
Spouse(s) Harem of Wives
Children Many
Religion Sunni Islam
Military service
Allegiance Flag of the Qing dynasty Qing dynasty Flag of the Republic of China Republic of China
Years of service 1916–1924
Rank Military commander
Unit Kansu Braves, Kashgar Garrison
Commands Military commander
Battles/wars Boxer Rebellion, Xinhai Revolution in Xinjiang
Ma Fuxing
Traditional Chinese 馬福興
Simplified Chinese 马福兴

Ma Fuxing (Ma Fu-hsing in Wade Giles; 1864–1924) was a Hui born in Yunnan, in Qing dynasty China. He was an ex-convict. During Yang Zengxin's reign in Xinjiang, Ma was appointed as a military commander, and then Titai of Kashgar.[1]

Ma Fuxing served as a general for the Qing dynasty. He joined the Kansu Braves during the Boxer Rebellion, under the command of general Ma Fulu and battled against the foreign forces during the Siege of the International Legations (Boxer Rebellion) and Battle of Peking.[2]

After the fall of the Qing dynasty, he started working for Yang Zengxin and recruited Dungan troops for him in 1911, and was posted in 1916 to Kashgar. In 1924 Yang intercepted some correspondence between Ma and the Zhili clique and became suspicious.[2]

Ma Fuxing was appointed as the commander of 2,000 Hui soldiers by Yang Zengxin.[3]

Reign

Ma Fuxing after being shot.
His reign was notorious for its repressiveness and his excesses. Ma Fuxing kept a harem of Uighur wives, and a hay cutting machine for severing the limbs of his victims.[4] The limbs were put on display along with notices on why they were severed on the city walls.[5] He also established government monopolies over industries such as petroleum, and made people purchase paraffin wax. Ma Fuxing also demanded that people call him padishah, which meant king.

Downfall

Yang Zengxin decided that Ma's excesses were too great, and sent Ma Shaowu, another Hui military commander, to attack and replace him.[6] Ma Shaowu attacked Ma Fuxing, and then personally executed him by shooting him after receiving a telegram from Yang Zengxin. Ma Fuxing's body was tied to a cross to be put on display.[7] Ma Shaowu then was appointed Daotai of Kashgar.

See also

References

  1. ^ Mary Patricia Joan Rouse (1992). Search for a new dominion: revolt and rebellion in Xinjiang, China during the Republican period, 1911-1949. Ithaca: Cornell University. p. 77. Retrieved 2010-06-28. 
  2. ^ a b Garnaut, Anthony. "From Yunnan to Xinjiang:Governor Yang Zengxin and his Dungan Generals". Pacific and Asian History, Australian National University). p. 106. Retrieved 2010-07-14. 
  3. ^ James A. Millward (2007). Eurasian crossroads: a history of Xinjiang. Columbia University Press. p. 168.  
  4. ^ Christian Tyler (2004). Wild West China: the taming of Xinjiang. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press. p. 112.  
  5. ^ Andrew D. W. Forbes (1986). Warlords and Muslims in Chinese Central Asia: a political history of Republican Sinkiang 1911-1949. Cambridge, England: CUP Archive. p. 24.  
  6. ^ Andrew D. W. Forbes (1986). Warlords and Muslims in Chinese Central Asia: a political history of Republican Sinkiang 1911-1949. Cambridge, England: CUP Archive. p. 24.  
  7. ^ Christian Tyler (2004). Wild West China: the taming of Xinjiang. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press. p. 113.  

External links

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.