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Manifesto

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Manifesto

A manifesto is a published verbal declaration of the intentions, motives, or views of the issuer, be it an individual, group, political party or government.[1][2][3][4] A manifesto usually accepts a previously published opinion or public consensus and/or promotes a new idea with prescriptive notions for carrying out changes the author believes should be made. It often is political or artistic in nature, but may present an individual's life stance. Manifestos relating to religious belief are generally referred to as creeds.

Contents

  • Etymology 1
  • Notable manifestos 2
    • Political 2.1
    • Artistic 2.2
    • Scientific and Educational 2.3
    • Technology 2.4
  • See also 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Etymology

Manifesto is derived from the Italian word manifesto, itself derived from the Latin manifestum, meaning clear or conspicuous. Its first recorded use in English is from 1620, in Nathaniel Brent's translation of Paolo Sarpi's History of the Council of Trent: "To this citation he made answer by a Manifesto" (p. 102). Similarly, "They were so farre surprised with his Manifesto, that they would never suffer it to be published" (p. 103)[5]

Notable manifestos

Political

Examples of notable manifestos:

Artistic

1IERE MANIFESTE DE LA REVUE D'ART "LE STYLE" [sic], published in 1918

Scientific and Educational

Technology

Piracy Manifesto installation by Miltos Manetas, design by Experimental Jetset. Swedish-English version

See also

References

  1. ^ Merriam-Webster online dictionary definition of Manifesto.
  2. ^ [1]
  3. ^ Dictionary.com definition of Manifesto.
  4. ^ David Robertson, The Routledge Dictionary of Politics, Edition 3, Psychology Press, 2004, p. 295, ISBN 0415323770, 9780415323772
  5. ^ Oxford English Dictionary
  6. ^ "La Transdisciplinarité - Manifeste". Nicol.club.fr. Retrieved June 24, 2012. 
  7. ^ "Werner Herzog Film: Home". Wernerherzog.com. Retrieved June 24, 2012. 
  8. ^ "Manifesto of Neo-Futuristic City". Neofuturistic.com. Retrieved August 18, 2014. 
  9. ^ "The Neofuturistic City Manifesto released online". Architecturelab.net. July 13, 2014. Retrieved August 18, 2014. 
  10. ^ Luko, C. S. (2011). "Reflections on the versatilist manifesto" (in Português).  
  11. ^ Critical Arts: A Journal of South-North Cultural and Media Studies 27(6), An Van Dienderen & Kris Rutten, 2013, p. 655-660.
  12. ^ "Psychology as the Behaviorist Views it". Retrieved March 30, 2013. 
  13. ^ "A Brief History of Debian - The Debian Manifesto". Debian.org. December 31, 2011. Retrieved June 24, 2012. 
  14. ^ "A Cypherpunk's Manifesto". 
  15. ^ "The Mozilla Manifesto". Mozilla.org. Retrieved June 24, 2012. 
  16. ^ "15-312 Principles of Programming Languages". Cs.cmu.edu. Retrieved June 24, 2012. 
  17. ^ "The Hardware Hacker Manifesto - I, Hacker". Daeken.com. Retrieved June 24, 2012. 

External links

  • Manifestos.net
  • British political party manifesto archives, 1900–present: Labour, Conservative, Liberal/SDP/Liberal Democrat
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