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Mark Macon

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Mark Macon

Mark Macon
Sport(s) Basketball
Biographical details
Born (1969-04-14) April 14, 1969
Saginaw, Michigan
Playing career
1987–1991 Temple
1991–1993 Denver Nuggets
1993–1996 Detroit Pistons
1996–1997 Florida Beach Dogs
1997 Mabo Pistoia
1999 Detroit Pistons
1999–2000 Oyak Bursa Spor Kulubu
2000–2001 Toros de Aragua
2001 Atlantic City Seagulls
Position(s) Guard
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
2003–2006 Temple (asst.)
2006–2007 Georgia State (asst.)
2007–2009 Binghamton (asst.)
2009–2012 Binghamton

Mark L. Macon (born April 14, 1969) is an American college basketball coach and former professional basketball player. He is the former head coach of Binghamton University.

Contents

  • Playing career 1
  • Coaching career 2
  • Head coaching record 3
  • See also 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

Playing career

Macon was named Mr. Basketball of Michigan in 1987 following his prep career at Saginaw Buena Vista High School.

A 6'4" (1.93 m), 185 lb (84 kg) guard, Macon played collegiately at Temple University, alongside future NBA players Aaron McKie and Eddie Jones, and was selected by the Denver Nuggets in the first round (eighth overall) of the 1991 NBA Draft.[1]

Macon played for the Nuggets and the Detroit Pistons in six NBA seasons, averaging 6.7 ppg in his career (and missing the entire schedule from 1996 to 1998). Macon also briefly represented the CBA's Florida Beachdogs and Italian club Mabo Pistoia, while still contracted to the Pistons, and Oyak Bursa Spor Kulubu (Turkey), the Atlantic City Seagulls (USBL) and Venezuela's Toros de Aragua, from 1999 to 2001.

Coaching career

Macon began coaching at his alma mater, Binghamton University as an assistant coach in 2007.

On October 14, 2009, Macon was named Binghamton's interim head coach, replacing Kevin Broadus, who was placed on administrative leave in the wake of the Binghamton University basketball scandal.[1] Two months later, Macon was given a raise from his $57,651 salary to an undisclosed amount.[2]

On April 28, 2010 Binghamton announced that Broadus would not return as head coach and signed Macon to a two-year contract extension to remain interim head basketball coach. On February 9, 2011 the university announced that Macon signed a contract extension through the 2013–14 season and that the interim tag was being removed.[3] On April 13, 2012, Macon was fired with a 23–70 record in three years at Binghamton, including a 2–29 mark (the worst record in school history) for the 2011–12 season.[4]

Head coaching record

Season Team Overall Conference Standing Postseason
Binghamton (America East Conference) (2009–2012)
2009–10 Binghamton 13–18[5] 8–8[5] 5th[6] Disqualified[7]
2010–11 Binghamton 8–23[8] 4–12[8] T–8th[9]
2011–12 Binghamton 2–29[10] 1–15[10] 9th[11]
Binghamton: 23–70 (.247) 13–35 (.271)
Total: 23–70 (.247)

      National champion         Postseason invitational champion  
      Conference regular season champion         Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion       Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Binghamton Bearcats basketball coach Kevin Broadus put on indefinite paid leave of absence - ESPN
  2. ^ Binghamton interim coach Mark Macon getting raise - ESPN
  3. ^ Macon receives contract extension
  4. ^ Binghamton Bearcats fire men's basketball coach Mark Macon - ESPN
  5. ^ a b Binghamton Bearcats Basketball 2009-10 Schedule - Bearcats Home and Away - ESPN
  6. ^ America East Conference Standings (2009–10) - College Basketball - ESPN
  7. ^ Binghamton Drops Out of America East Tournament - NYTimes.com
  8. ^ a b Binghamton Bearcats Basketball 2010-11 Schedule - Bearcats Home and Away - ESPN
  9. ^ America East Conference Standings (2010–11) - College Basketball - ESPN
  10. ^ a b Binghamton Bearcats Basketball 2011-12 Schedule - Bearcats Home and Away - ESPN
  11. ^ America East Conference Standings (2011–12) - College Basketball - ESPN

External links

  • NBA stats @ basketball-reference.com
  • Basketpedya career data
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