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Matthew Henry

Matthew Henry

Matthew Henry (18 October 1662 – 22 June 1714) was a Welsh-born or British Non-Conformist minister and author.

Contents

  • Life 1
  • Works 2
  • Quotation 3
  • Memorial 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

Life

Henry was born at Broad Oak, Iscoyd, a farmhouse on the borders of Flintshire and Shropshire. His father, Philip Henry, had just been ejected under the Act of Uniformity 1662. Unlike most of his fellow-sufferers, Philip possessed some private means, and was thus able to give his son a good education. Matthew went first to a school at Islington, and then to Gray's Inn. He soon gave up his legal studies for theology, and in 1687 became minister of a Presbyterian congregation at Chester.[1] While in Chester, Henry founded the Presbyterian Chapel in Trinity Street.[2] He moved again in 1712 to Mare Street, Hackney. Two years later (22 June 1714), he died suddenly of apoplexy at the Queen's Aid House (41 High Street) in Nantwich, while on a journey from Chester to London.[1][3]

Works

Matthew Henry's well-known six-volume Exposition of the Old and New Testaments (1708–

  • Biography of Matthew Henry
  • Matthew Henry Concise Commentary on the Whole Bible
  • Matthew Henry Complete Commentary on the Whole Bible
  • A Method for PrayerMatthew Henry –
  • A Method for Prayer' 1710 edition'Free eBook and audio book for Matthew Henry –
  • Matthew Henry QUOTES – Daily
  • Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary on the Bible -- Android App
  • Matthew Henry Complete Commentary on the Whole Bible -- Android App
  • Works by or about Matthew Henry at Internet Archive
  • Works by Matthew Henry at LibriVox (public domain audiobooks)

External links

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain

  1. ^ a b Religious Tract Society, Christian Biography: Lives of William Cowper, Mrs. Ann H. Judson, Anna Jane Linnard, Matthew Henry, 1799, Matthew Henry
  2. ^ a b
  3. ^ Images of England: 41 High Street, Nantwich
  4. ^
  5. ^ a b
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  11. ^ Matthew Henry Commentary on the Whole Bible (Complete)

References

In 1860 a memorial was erected in Chester to commemorate Matthew Henry. This consists of an obelisk designed by Thomas Harrison that incorporates a bronze medallion by Matthew Noble. The obelisk originally stood in the churchyard of St Bridget's Church, and was moved in the 1960s to stand on a roundabout opposite the entrance to Chester Castle.[2]

Memorial

Perhaps his best-known quotation is about the relationship between men and women, from the story of the creation of Eve, in the Book of Genesis: "the woman was made of a rib out of the side of Adam; not made out of his head to rule over him, nor out of his feet to be trampled upon by him, but out of his side to be equal with him, under his arm to be protected, and near his heart to be beloved".[11]

Quotation

Several abbreviated editions of the Commentary were published in the twentieth century; more recently the Christian linguist and author of reference books, Martin H. Manser, edited a version in modern English: The New Matthew Henry Commentary: The Classic Work with Updated Language (Zondervan 2010).

Henry's Miscellaneous Writings, including a Life of Mr. Philip Henry, The Communicant's Companion, Directions for Daily Communion with God, A Method for Prayer, A Scriptural Catechism, and numerous sermons, the life of his father, tracts, and biography of eminent Christians, together with the sermon on the author's death by William Tong were edited in 1809; and in 1830 a new edition included sermons not previously included and Philip Henry's "What Christ is made to believers". The collection was issued several times by different publishers.[10]

He is allowed by all competent judges, to have been a person of strong understanding, of various learning, of solid piety, and much experience in the ways of God. And his exposition is generally clear and intelligible, the thoughts being expressed in plain words: It is also found, agreeable to the tenor of scripture, and to the analogy of faith. It is frequently full, giving a sufficient explication of the passages which require explaining. It is in many parts deep, penetrating farther into the inspired writings than most other comments do. It does not entertain us with vain speculations, but is practical throughout: and usually spiritual too teaching us how to worship God, not in form only, but in spirit and in truth.[9]

Famous Charles Spurgeon used and heartily commended the work, with Whitefield reading it through four times — the last time on his knees.[7] Spurgeon stated, "Every minister ought to read it entirely and carefully through once at least." [8] John Wesley wrote of Henry:

Henry's commentaries are primarily exegetical, dealing with the scripture text as presented, with his prime intention being explanation, for practical and devotional purposes. While not being a work of textual research, for which Henry recommended Matthew Poole's Synopsis Criticorum, Henry's Exposition gives the result of a critical account of the original as of his time, with practical application.[6][5] It was considered sensible and stylish, a commentary for devotional purposes.

[5]

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