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Megan Moulton-Levy

 

Megan Moulton-Levy

Megan Moulton-Levy
Country (sports)  Jamaica (2003–2007)
 United States (2008–Present)
Residence Washington DC, USA
Born (1985-03-11) March 11, 1985
Grosse Pointe, Michigan, USA
Height 5 ft (1.5 m)
Turned pro 2008
Plays Right-handed (one-handed backhand)
Prize money $213,689
Singles
Career record 55–51
Career titles 1 ITF
Highest ranking No. 237 (July 6, 2009)
Doubles
Career record 158–144
Career titles 1 WTA, 10 ITF
Highest ranking No. 50 (July 22, 2013)
Grand Slam Doubles results
Australian Open 2R (2013)
French Open 2R (2013)
Wimbledon 2R (2013)
US Open 2R (2013)
Last updated on: March 11, 2014.

Megan Moulton-Levy (born March 11, 1985) is a Jamaican-American professional tennis player. Her career high WTA singles ranking is world no. 237, which she reached on July 6, 2009. Her career high doubles ranking is world no. 50, which she reached on July 22, 2013.

Early life

Moulton Levy's mother is Dr. Paulette Moulton, a dermatologist, and her father is Dr. George Levy, a record-setting sprinter at Nebraska who competed in the 1972 Munich Olympics in the 100 and 4x100, and who is now an ear, nose and throat doctor.[1][2] She was born in Grosse Pointe, Michigan.[3][4][5]

College

Moulton-Levy went to Aiglon College, an international boarding school in Switzerland. She played in college at the College of William & Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia from 2004 to 2008. She was a four-time Colonial Athletic Association (CAA) Women's Tennis Player of the Year; this four-time player of the year selection marked her as only the second athlete, regardless of sport or gender, to ever sweep such an award in the CAA's history. Her three selections as the CAA Tournament MVP are also the most ever. Moulton-Levy was also a six-time All-American who reached the semifinals of the 2006 NCAA Singles Championship and the finals of the 2007 NCAA Doubles Championship. Finally, she twice received the National ITA/Arthur Ashe, Jr. Award for Leadership and Sportsmanship. She was won the most combined singles and doubles matches in school history (249).[2]

WTA career finals

Doubles: 1 (1 title)

Legend
Grand Slam tournaments (0–0)
WTA Tour Championships (0–0)
Tier I / Premier Mandatory & Premier 5 (0–0)
Tier II / Premier (0–0)
Tier III, IV & V / International (1–0)
Finals by surface
Hard (1–0)
Grass (0–0)
Clay (0–0)
Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Partner Opponents in final Score in final
Winner 1. April 6, 2014 Monterrey Open, Monterrey, Mexico Hard Darija Jurak Timea Babos
Olga Govortsova
7–6(7–5), 3–6, [11–9]

ITF Career Finals

Singles: 2 (1–1)

$100,000 tournaments
$75,000 tournaments
$50,000 tournaments
$25,000 tournaments
$10,000 tournaments
Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Opponent Score
Winner 1. July 22, 2008 Evansville, USA Hard Emily Webley-Smith 6–3, 6–4
Runner-up 1. November 18, 2008 Puebla, Mexico Hard María Fernanda Álvarez Terán 6–4, 3–6, 6–4

Doubles 22 (10–12)

$100,000 tournaments
$75,000 tournaments
$50,000 tournaments
$25,000 tournaments
$10,000 tournaments
Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Partner Opponents in the final Score
Winner 1. June 7, 2004 Alcobaça, Portugal Hard Alanna Broderick Krizia Borgarello
Silvia Disderi
7–5, 6–1
Runner-up 1. June 14, 2004 Montemor-o-Novo, Portugal Hard Alanna Broderick Frederica Piedade
Alienor Tricerri
6–4, 6–3
Winner 2. August 13, 2008 London, Great Britain Hard Emily Webley-Smith Martina Babakova
Manana Shapakidze
6–1, 6–1
Winner 3. November 18, 2008 Puebla, Mexico Hard Audra Cohen María Fernanda Álvarez Terán
Veronica Spiegel
6–2, 6–4
Runner-up 2. December 22, 2008 Delhi, India Hard Emily Webley-Smith Hwang I-Hsuan
Zhang Ling
6–3, 7–6(7–4)
Runner-up 3. January 27, 2009 Laguna Niguel, USA Hard Laura Siegemund Vanessa Henke
Darija Jurak
4–6, 6–3, [10–8]
Runner-up 4. March 18, 2009 Cairo, Egypt Clay Laura Siegemund Anikó Kapros
Katalin Marosi
7–5, 6–3
Runner-up 5. June 15, 2009 Belém, Brazil Hard Ana-Clara Duarte Maria-Fernanda Alves
Carla Tiene
7–6(7–1), 7–5
Runner-up 6. June 30, 2009 Boston, USA Hard Mallory Cecil Maria-Fernanda Alves
Ahsha Rolle
6–1, 4–6, [10–6]
Winner 4. January 20, 2010 Wrexham, Great Britain Hard (i) Mallory Cecil Iveta Gerlová
Lucie Kriegsmannová
4–6, 6–0, [11–9]
Runner-up 7. January 26, 2010 Grenoble, France Hard (i) Mallory Cecil Victoria Larrière
Irina Ramialison
6–3, 6–4
Winner 5. May 25, 2010 Carson, USA Hard Lindsay Lee-Waters Christina Fusano
Courtney Nagle
6–1, 6–2
Runner-up 8. June 22, 2010 Boston, USA Hard Lindsay Lee-Waters Kimberly Couts
Tetiana Luzhanska
6–4, 3–6, [10–8]
Winner 6. July 6, 2010 Grapevine, USA Hard Lindsay Lee-Waters Kimberly Couts
Tetiana Luzhanska
6–2, 7–5
Winner 7. September 21, 2010 Albuquerque, USA Hard Lindsay Lee-Waters Abigail Spears
Mashona Washington
2–6, 6–3, [10–8]
Winner 8. September 28, 2010 Las Vegas, USA Hard Lindsay Lee-Waters Irina Falconi
Maria Sanchez
1–6, 7–5, [10–4]
Runner-up 9. May 10, 2011 Prague, Czech Republic Clay Lindsay Lee-Waters Petra Cetkovská
Michaëlla Krajicek
6–2, 6–1
Runner-up 10. July 5, 2011 Waterloo, Canada Clay Eugenie Bouchard Alexandra Mueller
Asia Muhammed
6–3, 3–6, [10–7]
Runner-up 11. July 19, 2011 Lexington, USA Hard Lindsay Lee-Waters Tamaryn Hendler
Chiara Scholl
7–6(11–9), 3–6, [10–7]
Winner 9. August 9, 2011 Bronx, USA Hard Ahsha Rolle Han Xinyun
Lu Jingjing
6–3, 7–6(7–5)
Runner-up 12. November 1, 2011 Grapevine, USA Hard Lindsay Lee-Waters Jamie Hampton
Zhang Shuai
6–4, 6–0
Winner 10. March 27, 2012 Osprey, USA Clay Lindsay Lee-Waters Alexandra Panova
Lesia Tsurenko
2–6, 6–4, [10–7]

Women's doubles performance timeline

Tournament 2011 2012 2013 2014 W–L
Grand Slam Tournaments
Australian Open A A 2R 1–1
French Open A A 2R 1–1
Wimbledon 1R 1R 2R 1–3
US Open A 1R 2R 1–2
Win–loss 0–1 0–2 4–4 4–7

References

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  5. ^ [1]

External links

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