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Military of Mauritius

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Military of Mauritius

Military of Mauritius
Coat of arms of Mauritius
Service branches National Police Force
paramilitary Special Force
National Coast Guard
Expenditures
Budget $9.1 million (FY01)
Percent of GDP 0.19%[1] (2012 est.)

Mauritius does not have a standing army. All military, police, and security functions are carried out by 10,000 active-duty personnel under the command of the Commissioner of Police. The 8,000-member National Police Force is responsible for domestic law enforcement. The 1,500-member Special Mobile Force (SMF) and the 500-member National Coast Guard are the only two paramilitary units in Mauritius. Both units are composed of police officers on lengthy rotations to those services.[2][3][4]

Contents

  • Organisation and Training 1
  • Equipment 2
    • Personal Weapons 2.1
    • Artillery 2.2
    • Vehicles 2.3
    • Aircraft 2.4
    • Vessels 2.5
  • References 3
  • See also 4

Organisation and Training

The SMF is organized as a ground infantry unit, with six rifle companies, two mobilisable paramilitary companies, and one engineer company, according to the IISS Military Balance 2007. It engages extensively in civic works projects. The Coast Guard has four patrol craft for search-and-rescue missions and surveillance of territorial waters. A 100-member police helicopter squadron assists in search-and-rescue operations. There also is a special supporting unit of 270 members trained in riot control.

Military advisers from the United Kingdom and India work with the SMF, the Coast Guard, and the Police Helicopter Unit, and Mauritian police officers are trained in the United Kingdom, India, and France. The United States provides training to Mauritian Coast Guard officers in such fields as seamanship and maritime law enforcement.

Equipment

Personal Weapons

Artillery

Vehicles

Aircraft

Mauritius air wing roundel

In March 1990 two radar equipped Dornier/HAL Do 228-101s were ordered to form a maritime surveillance element by July 1991. These aircraft were reinforced in 1992 by a single twin turbo prop Pliatus/BN BN-2T Maritime Defender for coastal patrol work.[2][3][4]

Aircraft Origin Type Versions In service[7] Notes
Britten-Norman BN-2T Islander  United Kingdom light utility BN-2T Islander 1
Dornier Do 228  Germany transport 228 2
Aérospatiale Alouette III  France utility helicopter SA-316B 3
Eurocopter AS555  France utility helicopter AS555SN 1
HAL Dhruv  India utility helicopter Dhurv (CFW) 1

Vessels

Naval Ensign
The MCGS Vigilant, the flagship of the Coast Guard of Mauritius, berthed in the harbour of Port Louis.

On 4 March 2011, the Mauritian Coast Guard signed a contract with PSU Garden Reach Shipbuilders & Engineers (GRSE), Kolkata, for the construction of an offshore patrol vessel (OPV).[8] The 1,300 tonne OPV will be 74.1 m long 11.40 m wide, and capable of a maximum speed of 20 knots. The OPV is to be delivered by September 2014. On 2 August 2013, was christened MCGS Barracuda.

References

  1. ^ "The World Factbook". Cia.gov. Retrieved 2014-11-14. 
  2. ^ a b IISS Military Balance 2007
  3. ^ a b IISS Military Balance 2010
  4. ^ a b World Aircraft Information Files; Brightstar Publishing; File 331, Sheet 4
  5. ^ Hogg, Ian (1989). Jane's Infantry Weapons 1989-90, 15th Edition. Jane's Information Group. pp. 826–836.  
  6. ^ http://www.fazsoi.defense.gouv.fr/les-fazsoi/breves/55-sauvetage-au-combat-de-niveau-1-sc1-a-l-ile-maurice.html?highlight=YTozOntpOjA7czozOiJpbGUiO2k6MTtzOjc6Im1hdXJpY2UiO2k6MjtzOjExOiJpbGUgbWF1cmljZSI7fQ==
  7. ^ "World Air Forces 2004". Flightglobal Insight. 2004. Retrieved 15 November 2014. 
  8. ^ http://idrw.org/?p=25172

See also

 This article incorporates public domain material from the CIA World Factbook document "2003 edition".

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