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Miscanthus sinensis

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Title: Miscanthus sinensis  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Eulalia (plant), Miscanthus, Pampas grass, Tsukimi, Miscanthus giganteus
Collection: Flora of Japan, Flora of Korea, Flora of Taiwan, Garden Plants, Grasses of China, Panicoideae
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Miscanthus sinensis

Miscanthus sinensis
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Monocots
(unranked): Commelinids
Order: Poales
Family: Poaceae
Subfamily: Panicoideae
Genus: Miscanthus
Species: M. sinensis
Binomial name
Miscanthus sinensis
Andersson (1855)
Japanese Susuki of the plateau

Miscanthus sinensis is a species of flowering plant in the grass family Poaceae, native to eastern Asia throughout most of China, Japan, Taiwan and Korea. It is an herbaceous perennial grass, growing to 0.8–2 m (3–7 ft) tall, rarely 4 m (13 ft), forming dense clumps from an underground rhizome. The leaves are 18–75 cm (7–30 in) tall and 0.3–2 cm broad. The flowers are purplish, held above the foliage. This plant is the preferred structure for the nesting of some species of paper wasps, such as Ropalidia fasciata.[1]

Contents

  • Nomenclature 1
  • Forms and varieties 2
  • Cultivation 3
  • Cultivars 4
  • Uses 5
  • Synonyms 6
  • Gallery 7
  • Notes 8
  • References 9
  • External links 10

Nomenclature

Common names include Chinese silver grass, Eulalia grass, maiden grass, zebra grass, Susuki grass, and porcupine grass. The Latin Miscanthus comes from the Greek for "stalk" and "flower".[2] The qualifier sinensis means "from China",[3] though the plant is found elsewhere in eastern Asia.

Forms and varieties

  • M. sinensis f. glaber Honda
  • M. sinensis var. gracillimus Hitchc.
  • M. sinensis var. variegatus Beal
  • M. sinensis var. zebrinus Beal

Cultivation

It is widely cultivated as an ornamental plant in temperate regions around the world.

It has become an invasive species in parts of North America.[4] However, it is possible to reduce the likelihood of escape or hybridization with extant wild M. sinensis populations with breeding and proper management.[5]

Cultivars

Several cultivars have been selected, including 'Strictus' with narrow growth habit, 'Variegata' with white margins, and 'Zebrina' with horizontal yellow and green stripes across the leaves. Those marked agm have gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.

  • 'Border Bandit'
  • 'Cosmopolitan' agm[6]
  • 'Dronning Ingrid'
  • 'Ferner Osten' agm[7]
  • 'Flamingo' agm[8]
  • 'Gewitterwolke' agm[9]
  • 'Ghana' agm[10]
  • 'Gold und Silber' agm[11]
  • 'Gracillimus'
  • 'Grosse Fontäne' agm[12]
  • 'Kaskade' agm[13]
  • 'Kleine Fontäne' agm[14]
  • 'Kleine Silberspinne' agm[15]
  • 'Malepartus'
  • 'Morning Light' agm[16]
  • 'Septemberrot' agm[17]
  • 'Silberfeder' agm[18]
  • 'Strictus' agm[19]
  • 'Undine' agm[20]
  • 'Variegatus'
  • 'Zebrinus' agm[21]

Uses

M. sinensis is a candidate for bioenergy production due to its high yield, even in high stress environments, easy propagation, effective nutrient cycling, and high genetic variation.[22]

Synonyms

  • Eulalia japonica Trin.
  • Saccharum japonicum Thunb.

Gallery

Notes

  1. ^ Ito, K (1992). "Relocation of Nests by Swarms and Nest Reconstruction in Late Autumn in the Primitively Eusocial Wasp, Ropalidia fasciata with Discussions on the Role of Swarming". Journal of Ethology 109 (2): 109–117.  
  2. ^ Coombes, Allen J. (2012). The A to Z of plant names. USA: Timber Press. p. 312.  
  3. ^ Harrison, Lorraine (2012). RHS Latin for gardeners. United Kingdom: Mitchell Beazley. p. 224.  
  4. ^ Chinese silvergrass. Invasive.org: Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health, February 2, 2010. Accessed May 28, 2010.
  5. ^ Quinn LD, Allen DJ, Stewart JR (2010) Invasiveness potential of Miscanthus sinensis: implications for bioenergy production in the United States. Global Change Biology Bioenergy. 1-2, 126-153.
  6. ^ "' 'CosmopolitanMiscanthus sinensis"RHS Plant Selector - . Retrieved 24 May 2013. 
  7. ^ "' 'Ferner OstenMiscanthus sinensis"RHS Plant Selector - . Retrieved 24 May 2013. 
  8. ^ "' 'FlamingoMiscanthus sinensis"RHS Plant Selector - . Retrieved 24 May 2013. 
  9. ^ "' 'GewitterwolkeMiscanthus sinensis"RHS Plant Selector - . Retrieved 24 May 2013. 
  10. ^ "' 'GhanaMiscanthus sinensis"RHS Plant Selector - . Retrieved 24 May 2013. 
  11. ^ "' 'Gold und SilberMiscanthus sinensis"RHS Plant Selector - . Retrieved 24 May 2013. 
  12. ^ "' 'Grosse FontaneMiscanthus sinensis"RHS Plant Selector - . Retrieved 24 May 2013. 
  13. ^ "' 'KaskadeMiscanthus sinensis"RHS Plant Selector - . Retrieved 24 May 2013. 
  14. ^ "' 'Kleine FontaneMiscanthus sinensis"RHS Plant Selector - . Retrieved 24 May 2013. 
  15. ^ "' 'Kleine SilberspinneMiscanthus sinensis"RHS Plant Selector - . Retrieved 24 May 2013. 
  16. ^ "' 'Morning LightMiscanthus sinensis"RHS Plant Selector - . Retrieved 24 May 2013. 
  17. ^ "' 'SeptemberrotMiscanthus sinensis"RHS Plant Selector - . Retrieved 24 May 2013. 
  18. ^ "' 'SilberfederMiscanthus sinensis"RHS Plant Selector - . Retrieved 24 May 2013. 
  19. ^ "' 'StrictusMiscanthus sinensis"RHS Plant Selector - . Retrieved 24 May 2013. 
  20. ^ "' 'UndineMiscanthus sinensis"RHS Plant Selector - . Retrieved 24 May 2013. 
  21. ^ "' 'ZebrinusMiscanthus sinensis"RHS Plant Selector - . Retrieved 24 May 2013. 
  22. ^ Stewart R, Toma Y, Fernández FG, Nishiwaki A, Yamada T, Bollero G (2009) The ecology and agronomy of “Miscanthus sinensis”, a species important to bioenergy crop development, in its native range in Japan: a review. Global Change Biology Bioenergy. 1-2, 126-153.

References

  • Miscanthus sinensisFlora of China:
  • 'Stricta'Miscanthus sinensisVirginia Cooperative Extension:

External links

  • : seasonal/color changeMiscanthus sinensisPhotos of
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