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Molson Canadian Rocks for Toronto

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Title: Molson Canadian Rocks for Toronto  
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Subject: Benefit concert, The Guess Who, La Chicane, Canada Jam, Jerry Grafstein
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Molson Canadian Rocks for Toronto

Toronto Rocks
the stage
Directed by David Russell
Starring Jann Arden
Dan Aykroyd
James Belushi
Country of origin Canada
Original language(s) English
Production
Producer(s) Justin Bomberg
Cinematography Justin Bomberg
Release
Original release
  • 2003 (2003)

Molson Canadian Rocks for Toronto was a benefit rock concert that was held in Toronto, Ontario, Canada on July 30, 2003. It was also known as "Toronto Rocks", "Stars 4 SARS", "SARSStock", "SARSfest", "SARS-a-palooza", the "SARS concert", or, more descriptively, "The Rolling Stones SARS Benefit Concert". Estimated to have between 450,000 and 500,000 people attending the concert, it is the largest outdoor ticketed event in Canadian history, and one of the largest in North American history.[1]

Contents

  • Overview 1
  • See also 2
  • References 3
  • External links 4

Overview

It was organized in about a month, upon the suggestion of headliners Downsview Park in northern Toronto, a former military base which also accommodated 800,000 people when Pope John Paul II visited the city in 2002. The concert was hosted by actor/singer Dan Aykroyd, and vendors sold Alberta beef in support of the Canadian beef industry, which had recently suffered because of a case of mad cow disease. North York General Hospital, which had been hit the hardest by the SARS outbreak in previous months, provided emergency on-site hospital services. The Toronto water department was initially supposed to provide free water by tapping the groundwater at the site, but were unable to do so due to health concerns. The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) and cable music station MuchMoreMusic provided coverage of parts of the concert throughout the day, including the end of The Rolling Stones' set.

Crowd

The concert opened in the afternoon with the Have Love Will Travel Revue (Aykroyd and James Belushi), Sam Roberts, Kathleen Edwards, La Chicane, The Tea Party, The Flaming Lips who invited artists from backstage to dance on stage with them dressed in fuzzy animal costumes, Sass Jordan, The Isley Brothers, and Blue Rodeo. Each band performed for 15–20 minutes. The second part of the concert began later in the afternoon and lasted into the night and included Justin Timberlake, The Guess Who, Rush, AC/DC, and The Rolling Stones, who performed a 90-minute set to end the concert.

Justin Timberlake was booed by the crowd, which was anticipating the harder-rocking second half of the concert. Throughout his performance he had to dodge water bottles, toilet paper, muffins, and other items thrown by the audience.[2] He later returned to duet with Mick Jagger on "Miss You" and also for Justin Timberlake's "Cry Me A River". The crowd was harangued by a visibly angry Keith Richards.

Rush was the last band to be added to the lineup. According to drummer, Neil Peart, they more-or-less felt pressured to perform because of Toronto being their hometown, although they are not the type to do one-off concert performances. Peart later confessed to not feeling anything like he looked while performing. A documentary DVD entitled Toronto Rocks was released in 2004, showing highlights of the event.

See also

References

  1. ^ "CBC News - Toronto Rocked". 
  2. ^ Rashbaum, Alyssa (July 31, 2003). "Justin Timberlake Joins Stones At Toronto Benefit, Gets Pelted With Garbage".  

External links

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