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Monkeywrenching

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Monkeywrenching

For other uses, see Monkey wrench (disambiguation).


The monkey wrench (US) or gas grips (UK) is an adjustable wrench, a later American development of eighteenth-century English coach wrenches. It was popular in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries but is now used only for heavier tasks, having been mostly replaced by the lighter and sleeker shifting adjustable. The term monkey wrench is also used colloquially to refer to the pipe wrench, owing to their broadly similar shapes.

Etymology and history

The World English Dictionary gives a nautical definition for monkey, as a modifier "denoting a small light structure or piece of equipment contrived to suit an immediate purpose: a monkey foresail ; a monkey bridge."[1]

Adjustable coach wrenches for the odd-sized nuts of wagon wheels were manufactured in England and exported to North America in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. They were set either by sliding a wedge, or later by twisting the handle, which turned a screw, narrowing or widening the jaws. In 1840, Worcester, Massachusetts knife manufacturer Loring Coes invented a screw-based coach wrench design in which the jaw width was set with a spinning ring fixed under the sliding lower jaw, above the handle. This was patented in 1841 and the tools were advertised and sold in the United States as monkey wrenches, a term which was already in use for the English handle-set coach wrenches.[2] For the next eighty-seven years a very wide and popular range of monkey wrenches was manufactured by Coes family partnerships, licensees and companies, which filed further wrench patents throughout the nineteenth century. Some Coes wrenches could be bought with wooden knife handles, harking back to the company's early knife making business. In 1909 the Coes Wrench Company advertised a six-foot-long "key" wrench, shaped like a monkey wrench, for use on railroads.[3][4] The Coes wrench designs were acquired by longtime toolmaker Bemis & Call of Springfield, Massachusetts in 1928. After 1939 its successor companies manufactured monkey wrenches from Coes designs until the mid-1960s, yielding a production run of over 120 years.[2][5][6]

Monkey wrenches are still manufactured and are used for some heavy tasks, but they have otherwise been mostly replaced by the shifting adjustable wrench, which is much lighter and has a smaller head, allowing it to fit more easily into tight spaces.

Charles Moncky story

The following story can be found in sundry publications from the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries:

That handy tool, the "monkey-wrench", is not so named because it is a handy thing to monkey with, or for any kindred reason. "Monkey" is not its name at all, but "Moncky." Charles Moncky, the inventor of it, sold his patent for $2000, and invested the money in a house in Williamsburg, Kings County, where he now lives.[7][8]

However, this was refuted by historical and patent research in the late nineteenth century.[2]

In popular culture

  • The wrench token in the popular board game Cluedo/Clue! is in the shape of an American Coes monkey wrench, although in some traditional UK editions the token is instead shaped like an open ended spanner.
  • "Monkey Wrench" is also the second song on the album The Colour and the Shape by the band Foo Fighters.
  • The Engineer in the popular video game Team Fortress 2 uses a monkey wrench.

References and notes

See also

Template:Hand tools

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