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Mtskheta

Mtskheta
მცხეთა
City

Location of Mtskheta within Georgia
Country  Georgia
Mkhare Kartli
Municipality Mtskheta District
Established 1,000 BC
Population 19,423
Time zone Georgian time (UTC+4)
Website mtskheta-mtianeti.gov.ge
UNESCO World Heritage Site
Historical Monuments of Mtskheta
Name as inscribed on the World Heritage List
Type Cultural
Criteria iii, iv
Reference 708
UNESCO region Europe
Inscription history
Inscription 1994 (18th Session)
Endangered 2009–present

Mtskheta (Tbilisi at the confluence of the Aragvi and Kura rivers. Mtskheta is one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the world. The city has a population of 19,423 (2008) and is the administrative center of the Mtskheta-Mtianeti region.

Due to its historical significance and several cultural monuments, the "Historical Monuments of Mtskheta" became a

  • Pictures of Mtskheta
  • UNESCO World Heritage listing
  • Mtskheta.ge - The Guide To Mtskheta
  • Mtskheta travel guide from Wikivoyage

External links

  • Abashidze, Irakli. Ed. Georgian Encyclopedia. Vol. IX. Tbilisi, Georgia: 1985.
  • Amiranashvili, Shalva. History of Georgian Art. Khelovneba: Tbilisi, Georgia: 1961.
  • Grigol Khantsteli. Chronicles of Georgia.
  • Rosen, Roger. Georgia: A Sovereign Country of the Caucasus. Odyssey Publications: Hong Kong, 1999. ISBN 962-217-748-4
  1. ^ a b "Historical city Mtskheta becomes “Holy City”". Agenda.ge. 7 April 2014. Retrieved 21 December 2014. 
  2. ^ UNESCO World Heritage in Danger: Historical Monuments of Mtskheta 2009
  3. ^ "Twinnings" (PDF). Central Union of Municipalities & Communities of Greece. Retrieved 2013-08-25. 

References

See also

  • Leuville-sur-Orge, France (2001)
  • Argos, Greece (1991)[3]

Mtskheta is twinned with:

International relations

The Historical Monuments of Mtskheta were recently placed on UNESCO's List of World Heritage in Danger, citing "serious deterioration of the stonework and frescoes" as the main threat to the site's long-term preservation.[2]

Threats

In the outskirts of Mtskheta are the ruins of Armaztsikhe fortress (3rd century BC), the Armaztsikhe acropolis (dating to the late 1st millennium BC), remains of a "Pompey's bridge" (according to legends built by Roman legionnaires of Pompey the Great in 1st century BC), the fragmentary remains of a royal palace (1st–3rd century AD), a nearby tomb of the 1st century AD, a small church of the 4th century, the Samtavro Monastery (11th century), and the fortress of Bebris Tsikhe (14th century). The Institute of Archaeology, and the garden of Mikheil Mamulashvili are also worthy of note. There is also a monument to sculptor Elena Machabell.

Georgian alphabet.

"Pompey's bridge", August 2008
Svetitskhoveli seen from an old street

Monuments

[1] In recognition of its role in the Georgian Christian history, Mtskheta was granted the status of a "Holy City" by Catholicos-Patriarch

The old city lies at the confluence of the rivers Mtkvari and Aragvi. The rare blend of cultural values had ruled in this part of the world since the Bronze Age until prosperous Christian era over the unique eclectic lifestyle creating the mood of the town which is as old as the history of Georgia. Mtskheta is the most religious city of Georgia as it has been the shrine of pagan idols since times immemorial and it is where Christianity in Georgia takes its origin.

King Vakhtang I Gorgasali, moved the capital from Mtskheta to the more easily defensible Tbilisi according to the will left by his father. However, Mtskheta continued to serve as the coronation and burial place for most kings of Georgia until the end of the kingdom in the 19th century.

Remains of towns at this location have been dated to earlier than the year 1000 BC, and Mtskheta was capital of the early Georgian Kingdom of Georgian Orthodox Church.

History

Contents

  • History 1
  • Monuments 2
  • Threats 3
  • International relations 4
  • See also 5
  • References 6
  • External links 7

[1]

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