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NASA Astronaut Group 13

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Title: NASA Astronaut Group 13  
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NASA Astronaut Group 13

NASA's Astronaut Group 13 (the Hairballs) was announced by NASA on 17 January 1990. The group name came from its selection of a black cat as a mascot, to play against the traditional unlucky connotations of the number 13.[1]

Contents

  • Pilots 1
  • Mission specialists 2
  • References 3
  • External links 4

Pilots

STS-56 Discovery[2] (Science Mission; Flew as a Mission specialist)
STS-69 Endeavour[2] (2nd flight of the Wake Shield Facility)
STS-80 Columbia[2] (3rd flight of the Wake Shield Facility)
STS-98 Atlantis[2] (ISS Assembily Mission - Launched the Destiny Laboratory Module)
STS-111 Endeavour[2] (ISS Resupply Mission; Launched Expedition 5)
STS-63 Discovery[3] (Shuttle-Mir Mission; became the first female pilot of a U.S. Spacecraft)
STS-84 Atlantis[3] (Shuttle-Mir Mission)
STS-93 Columbia[3] (Deployed Chandra X-Ray Observatory; became the first female commander of a U.S. Spacecraft)
STS-114 Discovery[3] (Return to Flight)
STS-67 Endeavour[4] (2nd flight of the ASTRO telescope)
STS-65 Columbia[5] (Science Mission)
STS-74 Atlantis[5] (Shuttle-Mir Mission)
STS-83 Columbia[5] (Intended to be a Science Mission; Mission cut short due to fuel cell problems)
STS-94 Columbia[5] (Science Mission using experiments intended to be conducted on STS-83)
STS-101 Atlantis[5] (ISS Supply Mission)
STS-55 Columbia[6] (German Spacelab Mission)
STS-71 Atlantis[6] (Shuttle-Mir Mission)
STS-84 Atlantis[6] (Shuttle-Mir Mission)
STS-91 Discovery[6] (Shuttle-Mir Mission)
STS-58 Columbia[7] (Science Mission)
STS-76 Atlantis[7] (Shuttle-Mir Mission)
STS-90 Columbia[7] (Science Mission)
STS-68 Endeavour[8] (Science Mission)
STS-79 Atlantis[8] (Shuttle-Mir Mission)
STS-89 Endeavour[8] (Shuttle-Mir Mission)
STS-106 Atlantis[8] (ISS Supply Mission)

Mission specialists

STS-51 Discovery (Launched the ACTS satellite)
STS-68 Endeavour (Science Mission)
STS-77 Endeavour (Spartan-207)
STS-108 Endeavour (ISS Resupply Mission)
ISS Expedition 4 (6 month mission to the ISS)
STS-111 Endeavour (The mission landed Expedition 4)
STS-65 Columbia (Science Mission)
STS-72 Endeavour (Returned Japan's Space Flyer Unit)
STS-92 Discovery (ISS Assembly Mission - Launched the Z1 Truss Segment and PMA-3)
Soyuz TMA-5 (The launch and landing vehicle of Expedition 10)
ISS Expedition 10 (6 month mission to the ISS)
STS-53 Discovery (Classified DoD Mission)
STS-59 Endeavour (Science Mission)
STS-76 Atlantis (Shuttle-Mir Mission)
STS-57 Endeavour (Science Mission)
STS-70 Discovery (Launched TDRS 7)
STS-88 Endeavour (ISS Assembly Mission - Launched Unity (Node 1), PMA-1, and PMA-2)
STS-109 Columbia (Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission; Columbia's last successful flight)
STS-55 Columbia (German Spacelab Mission)
STS-63 Discovery (Shuttle-Mir Mission)
STS-54 Endeavour (Launched TDRS 6)
STS-64 Discovery (Science Mission)
STS-78 Columbia (Science Mission)
STS-101 Atlantis (ISS Supply Mission)
STS-102 Discovery (The mission launched Expedition 2)
ISS Expedition 2 (6 month mission to the ISS)
STS-105 Discovery (The mission landed Expedition 2)
STS-59 Endeavour (Science Mission)
STS-68 Endeavour (Science Mission)
STS-80 Columbia (3rd flight of the Wake Shield Facility)
STS-98 Atlantis (ISS Assembly Mission - Launched the Destiny Laboratory Module)
STS-58 Columbia (Science Mission)
STS-74 Atlantis (Shuttle-Mir Mission)
STS-92 Discovery (ISS Assembly Mission - Launched the Z1 Truss Segment and PMA-3)
Soyuz TMA-7 (The launch and landing vehicle of Expedition 12)
ISS Expedition 12 (6 month mission to the ISS; was the Expedition 12 CDR)
STS-51 Discovery (Launched the ACTS satellite)
STS-69 Endeavour (2nd flight of the Wake Shield Facility)
STS-88 Endeavour (ISS Assembly Mission - Launched Unity (Node 1), PMA-1, and PMA-2)
STS-109 Columbia (Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission; Columbia's last successful flight)
STS-56 Discovery (Science Mission)
STS-66 Atlantis (Science Mission - ATLAS-03)
STS-96 Discovery (ISS Supply Mission)
STS-110 Atlantis (Launched the S0 Truss Segment)
STS-60 Discovery (Shuttle-Mir Mission)
STS-76 Atlantis (Shuttle-Mir Mission)
STS-65 Columbia (Science Mission)
STS-70 Discovery (Launched TDRS 7)
STS-83 Columbia (Intended to be a Science Mission; Mission cut short due to fuel cell problems)
STS-94 Columbia (Science Mission using experiments intended to be conducted on STS-83)
STS-57 Endeavour (Science Mission)
STS-63 Discovery (Shuttle-Mir Mission)
STS-83 Columbia (Intended to be a Science Mission; Mission cut short due to fuel cell problems)
STS-94 Columbia (Science Mission using experiments intended to be conducted on STS-83)
STS-99 Endeavour (Shuttle Radar Topography Mission)

References

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  1. ^ Jones, Thomas, "Sky Walking, An Astronaut's Memoir," Harper Collins, 2006
  2. ^ a b c d e f
  3. ^ a b c d e
  4. ^ a b
  5. ^ a b c d e f
  6. ^ a b c d e
  7. ^ a b c d
  8. ^ a b c d e

External links

  • Astronaut Biographies: Home Page


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