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National Association of Schools of Music

 

National Association of Schools of Music

The National Association of Schools of Music (NASM) is an association of post-secondary music schools in the United States and the principal U.S. accreditor for higher education in music. It was founded on October 20, 1924, and is based in Reston, Virginia. Accreditation commenced in 1939.

Accreditation

NASM is recognized by the [1][2] It currently has approximately 625 accredited institutional members, including specialty schools of music, conservatories, and universities offering music programs.

History

Leader from six music schools met on June 10, 1924, to organize the inaugural convention of the "National Association of Schools of Music and Allied Arts" to be held on October 20, 1924, in Pittsburgh. The founding leaders were:

  1. Burnet Corwin Tuthill (1888–1982), Cincinnati Conservatory of Music
  2. John James Hattstaedt (1851–1931), American Conservatory of Music (1886–1991)
  3. Kenneth McPherson Bradley (1872–1954), Bush Conservatory of Music, which merged in 1932 with The Chicago Conservatory College under duress of the Great Depression
  4. Arthur Wright Mason (1866–1955), Louisville Conservatory of Music, which merged in 1932 with the University of Louisville under duress of the Great Depression
  5. Charles Newell Boyd (1875–1937), Pittsburgh Musical Institute, which merged in 1963 with the University of Pittsburgh
  6. Edwin John Stringham (1890–1974), Wolcott Conservatory of Music, founded in 1920 and in 1925 was reorganized and renamed as the Denver College of Music

The attendees at the first NASM Convention of October 20, 1924, decided to officially form the "National Association of Schools of Music and Allied Arts." The accreditation aspect of NASM, though, did not launch until about 1929. The charter members currently in existence are:

NASM's founding officers were Kenneth M. Bradley, President; Burnet C. Tuthill, Secretary; and Charles N. Boyd, Treasurer.[3][4]

Current and past presidents

See also

References

General references

  • Carl Melvin Neumeyer (1911–1972), "The History of the National Association of Schools of Music," Doctor of Music Education dissertation, Indiana University, Bloomington (1954) OCLC 9483822
  • Carl Melvin Neumeyer (editor) (1911-1972), By-laws and regulations, National Association of Schools of Music (1965) OCLC 4558345
  • Bulletin of the National Association of Schools of Music OCLC 3537484 OCLC 592934302 OCLC 613197394
  • Burnet Corwin Tuthill (1888–1982), NASM, the first forty years; a personal history of the National Association of Schools of Music, National Association of Schools of Music (1973) OCLC 624531 LCCN 73-159574
  • Sheila A. Barrows (born 1931) (compiler & editor), Historical Perspectives, 1924-1999: National Association of Schools of Music, Seventy-Fifth Anniversary, National Association of Schools of Music (1999) OCLC 43434388ISBN 1879120054 ISBN 9781879120051 ISBN 1-879120-05-4

Inline citations

  1. ^ Directory of Programmatic Accrediting Organizations, Council for Higher Education Accreditation, accessed December 11, 2009
  2. ^ 2009-2010 Directory of CHEA-Recognized Organizations, Council for Higher Education Accreditation, accessed December 7, 2010
  3. ^ Los Angeles Times, Nov. 16, 1924, "Organize National Music Association", retrieved from ProQuest Historical Newspapers Los Angeles Times (1881-1986), pg. C39
  4. ^ Tuthill, pg. 1

External links

  • National Association of Schools of Music– Official website
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