Neritic

The neritic zone, also called coastal waters, the coastal ocean or the sublittoral zone,[1] is the part of the ocean extending from the low tide mark to the edge of the continental shelf, with a relatively shallow depth extending to about 200 meters (110 fathoms or 667 feet). The neritic zone has generally well-oxygenated water, low water pressure, and relatively stable temperature and salinity levels. These, combined with presence of light and the resulting photosynthetic life, such as phytoplankton and floating sargassum,[2] make the neritic zone the location of the majority of sea life.

Zooplankton, free-floating creatures ranging from microscopic foraminiferans to small fish and shrimp, live in this zone, and together with the phytoplankton form the base of the food pyramid that supports most of the world's great fishing areas

At the edge of the neritic zone, the continental slope begins, descending from the continental shelf to the abyssal plain and the pelagic zone.

See also

Coastal fish, also called offshore fish or neritic fish, inhabit the sea between the shoreline and the edge of the continental shelf. Since the continental shelf is usually less than 200 metres deep, it follows that pelagic coastal fish are generally epipelagic fish, inhabiting the sunlit epipelagic zone.[1] Coastal fish can be contrasted with ocean fish or offshore fish, which inhabit the oceans beyond the continental shelves.

References

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