Nervi erigentes

Nerve: Pelvic splanchnic nerves
Latin nervi pelvici splanchnici
nervi erigentes
From S2-S4

Pelvic splanchnic nerves or nervi erigentes are splanchnic nerves that arise from sacral spinal nerves S2, S3, S4 to provide parasympathetic innervation to the hindgut.

Structure

The pelvic splanchnic nerves arise from the ventral rami of the S2-S4 and enter the sacral plexus. They travel to their side's corresponding inferior hypogastric plexus, located bilaterally on the walls of the rectum.

From there, they contribute to the innervation of the pelvic and genital organs. The nerves regulate the emptying of the urinary bladder and the rectum as well as sexual functions like erection.

They contain both preganglionic parasympathetic fibers as well as visceral afferent fibers.

The parasympathetic nervous system is referred to as the craniosacral outflow; the pelvic splanchnic nerves are the sacral component. They are in the same region as the sacral splanchnic nerves, which arise from the sympathetic trunk and provide sympathetic efferent fibers.

The proximal 2/3 of the transverse colon, and the rest of the proximal gastrointestinal tract is supplied its parasympathetic fibers by the vagus nerve. In the distal 1/3 of the transverse colon, and through the sigmoid and rectum, the pelvic splanchnic nerves take over.

In Popular Culture

The pelvic splanchnic nerves are featured as a key plot point in the Futurama episode Parasites Lost.

See also

External links

  • eMedicine Dictionary
  • 43:15-0107
  • med.umich.edu
  • figures/chapter_32/32-6.HTM
  • pelvicnerves)

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