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New Party (Canada)

New Party was the interim name used by the new political party being established in Canada from 1958 to 1961 by the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) and the Canadian Labour Congress (CLC), which eventually defined itself as a social democratic party.[1] In 1958 a joint CCF-CLC committee, the National Committee for the New Party (NCNP), was formed and spent the next three years laying down the foundations of the 'New Party'.[2] During the process of founding the party, the New Party name was used in the October 1960 Peterborough, Canadian federal by-election; which was won by its candidate, Walter Pitman.[3] In August 1961, at the end of a five-day-long convention, the New Democratic Party (NDP) was born and T.C. 'Tommy' Douglas was elected its first leader.[4] Once the NDP was formed, the New Party clubs, and affiliates automatically ceased, and became part of newly formed party.

Notes

  1. ^ Young, pp. 132-134
  2. ^ Morton, pp.20-24
  3. ^ MacDonald, pp. 109-111
  4. ^ Stewart (2000), pp. 213-214

References

  • Azoulay, Dan (1999). "A Desperate Holding Action: The Survival of the Ontario CCF/NDP, 1948–1964". In Azoulay, Dan. Canadian political parties:historical readings. Toronto: Irwin Publishing. pp. 342–363.  
  • Boyko, John (2006). Into the Hurricane: Attacking Socialism and the CCF. Winnipeg, Canada: J. Gordon Shillingford Publishing Inc.  
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  • Lewis, David (1981). The Good Fight: Political Memoirs 1909–1958. Toronto:  
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  • McLeod, Thomas; Ian McLeod (2004). The Road to Jerusalem (2 ed.). Calgary: Fifth House.  
  • Morton, Desmond (1986). The New Democrats, 1961-1986 : the politics of change (3 ed.). Toronto: Copp Clark Pitman.  
  • Shackleton, Doris French (1975). Tommy Douglas. Toronto:  
  • Smith, Cameron (1989). Unfinished Journey: The Lewis Family. Toronto: Summerhill Press.  
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  • Young, Walter D. (1969). The anatomy of a party: the national CCF 1932–61. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.  

See also

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