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New York Herald

New York Herald
New York Herald Building (1908) by architect Stanford White was demolished in 1921.
Type Daily newspaper
Format Tabloid
Publisher James Gordon Bennett, Sr.
James Gordon Bennett, Jr.
Founded 1835
Ceased publication 1924
Headquarters Manhattan
Circulation 84,000 (1861)

The New York Herald was a large distribution newspaper based in New York City that existed between May 6, 1835, and 1924.

Contents

  • History 1
    • Evening Telegram 1.1
  • Commemorated 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

History

The first issue of the paper was published by James Gordon Bennett, Sr., on May 6, 1835. By 1845, it was the most popular and profitable daily newspaper in the United States.[1] In 1861, it circulated 84,000 copies and called itself "the most largely circulated journal in the world." [2] Bennett stated that the function of a newspaper "is not to instruct but to startle and amuse."[3] [4] His politics tended to be anti-Catholic and he had tended to favor the Know-Nothing faction, though he was not particularly anti-immigrant as the Know-Nothing party were. During the American Civil War, his policy as expressed by the newspaper was to staunchly support the Democratic Party. Frederic Hudson served as managing editor of the paper from 1846–1866.

Bennett turned over control of the paper to his son arctic region.

In 1874, the Herald ran the infamous New York Zoo hoax, where the front page of the newspaper was devoted entirely to a fabricated story of wild animals getting loose at the Central Park Zoo and attacking numerous people.

On October 4, 1887, Bennett Jr. sent Julius Chambers to Paris, France to launch a European edition. Bennett himself later moved to Paris, but the New York Herald suffered from his attempt to manage its operation in New York by telegram. In 1924, after Bennett Jr.'s death, the New York Herald was acquired by its smaller rival the New York Tribune, to form the New York Herald Tribune. In 1959, the New York Herald Tribune and its European edition were sold to John Hay Whitney, then the U.S. ambassador to Britain. In 1966, the New York paper ceased publication. The Washington Post and the New York Times acquired joint control of the European edition, renaming it the International Herald Tribune. Today, the IHT is owned entirely by the New York Times and remains an English language paper, printed at 35 sites around the world and for sale in more than 180 countries.

The electrotyping department of the New York Herald in 1902
Rows of linotype machines in the composing room of the Herald in 1902

When the Herald was still under the authority of its original publisher Bennett, it was considered to be the most invasive and sensationalist of the leading New York papers. Its ability to entertain the public with timely daily news made it the leading circulation paper of its time.

Evening Telegram

The New York Evening Telegram was founded in 1867 by the junior Bennett, and was considered by many to be an evening edition of the Herald. Frank Munsey acquired the Telegram in 1920, which ceased its connection to the Herald.[6]

Commemorated

New York's Herald Square is named after the New York Herald newspaper; in the north side of the square there is a sculpture commemorating the Bennetts. The statue of Minerva, the Bellringers, and Owls by Antonin Carles originally graced the New York Herald building and rang every hour until it was moved to Herald Square. North of Herald Square is Times Square, which is named after rival The New York Times.

See also

References

  1. ^ Crouthamel, James (1989). Bennett's New York Herald and the Rise of the Popular Press.  
  2. ^  
  3. ^ Katherine Roeder (25 March 2014). Wide Awake in Slumberland: Fantasy, Mass Culture, and Modernism in the Art of Winsor McCay. Univ. Press of Mississippi. pp. 28–.  
  4. ^ New Outlook. Outlook Publishing Company, Incorporated. 1892. pp. 489–. 
  5. ^  
  6. ^ "The Telegram Sold to Scripps-Howard". The New York Times. 12 February 1927. 

External links

  • : or, Old news on board of a homeward ...New York HeraldThree months with the by John Henry Potter
  • Photographs and architectural sketches of the New York Herald Building


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