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New Zealand general election, 1963

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Title: New Zealand general election, 1963  
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Subject: List of New Zealand Labour Party MPs, Elections in New Zealand, Taupō (New Zealand electorate), Porirua (New Zealand electorate), New Lynn (New Zealand electorate)
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New Zealand general election, 1963

New Zealand general election, 1963

30 November 1963 (1963-11-30)

All 80 seats in the New Zealand Parliament
41 seats were needed for a majority
Turnout 1,196,631 (89.6%)
  First party Second party
 
Leader Keith Holyoake Arnold Nordmeyer
Party National Labour
Leader since 1957 1963
Leader's seat Pahiatua Island Bay
Last election 46 seats, 47.6% 34 seats, 43.4%
Seats won 45 35
Seat change {{Navbox with collapsible sections name = Religion topics state = autocollapse bodyclass = hlist title = Religion selected = sect1 = Major groups abbr1 = major child group1 = Abrahamic list1 = group2 = Indo-European child |groupstyle=font-weight:normal; group1 = Indo-Iranian list1 = group2 = European list2 = group1 = Abrahamic child |groupstyle=font-weight:normal; | group1 = Judaism list1 = group2 = Christianity list2 =
Popular vote 563,875 524,066
Percentage 47.1% 43.7%
Swing {{Navbox with collapsible sections name = Religion topics state = autocollapse bodyclass = hlist title = Religion selected = sect1 = Major groups abbr1 = major child group1 = Abrahamic list1 = group2 = Indo-European child |groupstyle=font-weight:normal; group1 = Indo-Iranian list1 = group2 = European list2 = group1 = Abrahamic child |groupstyle=font-weight:normal; | group1 = Judaism list1 = group2 = Christianity list2 =

Prime Minister before election

Keith Holyoake
National

Elected Prime Minister

Keith Holyoake
National

The 1963 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of New Zealand Parliament's 34th term. The results were almost identical to those of the previous election, and the governing National Party remained in office.

Background

The 1960 election had been won by the National Party, beginning New Zealand's second period of National government. Keith Holyoake, who had briefly been Prime Minister at the end of the first period, returned to office. The elderly leader of the Labour Party, Walter Nash, had agreed to step down following his government's defeat, but disliked the prospect of being succeeded by his Minister of Finance, Arnold Nordmeyer. Nash instead backed first Clarence (Gerry) Skinner and then, after Skinner's death, Fred Hackett. In the end, however, Nordmeyer was victorious. Nordmeyer, however, was unpopular with the general public, being remembered with hostility for the tax hikes in his so-called 'Black Budget'. Labour struggled to overcome this negative perception of its leader, and was only partially successful.

There had been an unusually large number of by-elections during the term of the 33rd Parliament. None of these had resulted in any upsets, and there was little indication for the population wanting a change. Holyoake started his election campaign on 4 November, not even a month out from the election.[1] Whilst television had just been introduced in New Zealand, the election campaign was a dull affair. And from 23 November, the Assassination of John F. Kennedy was the dominant topic in the media.[1]

The election

The date for the main 1963 elections was 30 November. 1,345,836 people were registered to vote, and turnout was 89.6%. This turnout was around average for the time. The number of seats being contested was 80, a number which had been fixed since 1902.

The following new (or reconstituted) electorates were introduced in 1963: Manurewa, New Lynn, Pakuranga, Porirua,

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