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Next Conservative Party of Canada leadership election

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Title: Next Conservative Party of Canada leadership election  
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Next Conservative Party of Canada leadership election

Conservative leadership election, TBD
Resigning leader Stephen Harper
Entrance Fee C$

The next Conservative Party of Canada leadership election will be held to choose a successor to Stephen Harper, who led the Conservative Party of Canada as its first leader from 2004, leading the party to three general election victories in 2006, 2008, and 2011. Following the defeat of his party in the 2015 election, Harper's resignation as party leader was announced by press release on election night, October 19, 2015.[1]

Contents

  • Timeline 1
  • Interim leadership 2
  • Permanent leadership 3
    • Prospective candidates 3.1
    • Declined 3.2
  • References 4

Timeline

  • October 19, 2015 – Federal election results in defeat of Conservative government. As Harper spoke to supporters in Calgary, making no reference to his future, a statement was released by the party announcing Harper's resignation as party leader and his request that an interim leader be chosen to lead the party in parliament until a leadership election can be held.[1]
  • November 4, 2015 – Harper will formally resigns as prime minister; Liberal government led by Justin Trudeau will be sworn in.[2]
  • November 5, 2015 – Conservative caucus is expected to hold its first meeting and elect an interim leader.[3]
  • Some members of the party’s national council are calling for a leadership convention as early as May 2016 according to Maclean's magazine. However, some Members of Parliament are calling for the vote to be delayed until 2017.[4][5]

Interim leadership

The caucus is to choose an interim leader at its first meeting, expected on November 5. Under the party's constitution the interim leader may not run for the permanent position. The interim leader will also serve as Leader of the Official Opposition in the Parliament of Canada.[6] It is unclear whether the entire Conservative parliamentary caucus, comprising both MPs and Senators, elects the interim leader or whether only MPs will participate. Conservative Party president John Walsh stated in his letter to caucus that only MPs will vote, however Senators have pointed out that the party constitution states that the entire parliamentary caucus votes.[7][3] If the caucus agrees to adopt the provisions of the Reform Act, only MPs will be able to vote for interim leader.[8]

The following MPs have declared their intention to run for interim leader:

Permanent leadership

Prospective candidates

Declined

References

  1. ^ a b "Stephen Harper resigns as Conservative leader". CTV News. October 19, 2015. Retrieved October 19, 2015. 
  2. ^ "Lifting the curtain on Harper's covert exit strategy". Ottawa Citizen. October 28, 2015. Retrieved October 29, 2015. 
  3. ^ a b "@Kady: Tory senators (probably) won't be left out of interim leadership vote". Ottawa Citizen. October 26, 2015. Retrieved October 26, 2015. 
  4. ^ a b Wells, Paul (October 23, 2015). "Conservative caucus unrest mounts".  
  5. ^ "Conservative MPs calling on party to hold leadership convention in spring 2017". The Hill Times. October 28, 2015. Retrieved October 29, 2015. 
  6. ^ a b c Spiteri, Ray (October 23, 2015). "Rob Nicholson wants to become interim leader of the federal Conservatives". National Post. Retrieved November 1, 2015. 
  7. ^ "Conservative Senator to challenge party brass over interim leadership selection rules". The Hill Times. October 22, 2015. Retrieved October 26, 2015. 
  8. ^ "Michael Chong urges MPs to 'reclaim their influence' as Reform Act takes effect". CBC News. October 27, 2015. Retrieved October 29, 2015. 
  9. ^ "Buzz begins over Harper's replacement". The Star-Phoenix. October 21, 2015. Retrieved October 21, 2015. 
  10. ^ a b "Rona Ambrose, Mike Lake to run for Conservative interim leadership".  
  11. ^ "Manitoba's Candice Bergen joins Conservative interim leadership contest". CBC News. October 27, 2015. Retrieved October 27, 2015. 
  12. ^ "Here’s something new: Rempel and Lebel want to be co-leaders of the Tories". David Akin's On the Hill. October 31, 2015. Retrieved October 31, 2015. 
  13. ^ "Erin O'Toole To Run For Interim Conservative Leadership". Huffington Post. Canadian Press. October 26, 2015. Retrieved October 26, 2015. 
  14. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Who will replace Steven Harper as leader of the Conservatives?". National Post. October 20, 2015. Retrieved October 20, 2015. 
  15. ^ "Charest, Kenney, Ford: Names fly as Conservatives plan leadership race". CityNews. October 20, 2015. Retrieved October 20, 2015. 
  16. ^ a b c "Tories face question of Harper’s replacement". The Hill Times. October 26, 2015. Retrieved October 26, 2015. 
  17. ^ "Election results promise repercussions for all party leaders". Chronicle-Herald. October 18, 2015. Retrieved October 19, 2015. 
  18. ^ "Ex-foreign affairs minister John Baird considering bid for Tory leadership". Globe and Mail. October 26, 2015. Retrieved October 26, 2015. 
  19. ^ "John Baird will not seek leadership of Conservative Party of Canada (Press Release)". Canada NewsWire. October 26, 2015. Retrieved October 26, 2015. 
  20. ^ "Jean Charest quashes rumours of Conservative leadership bid to replace Stephen Harper". CBC News. October 22, 2015. Retrieved October 22, 2015. 
  21. ^ "Christy Clark mentioned to replace Harper as Conservative leader". CTV News. October 20, 2015. Retrieved October 20, 2015. 
  22. ^ "B.C. Premier Christy Clark rejects Conservative leadership bid". CBC News. October 20, 2015. Retrieved October 20, 2015. 
  23. ^ "Bernard Lord won't seek federal Conservative leadership". CBC News. October 21, 2015. Retrieved October 21, 2015. 
  24. ^ "James Moore calls for a more inclusive Conservative leader". Vancouver Sun. October 28, 2015. Retrieved October 29, 2015. 
  25. ^ "Premier Brad Wall says he won’t run for Conservative leadership". Regina Leader-Post. October 20, 2015. Retrieved October 20, 2015. 
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