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North Dakota Highway 13

North Dakota Highway 13
;">Route information
Maintained by NDDOT
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West end: Template:Jct/extra ND 1804 near Linton
  Template:Jct/extra I-29 in Mooreton
East end: Template:Jct/extra ND 210 in Wahpeton
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Length:
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;">Highway system

North Dakota Highways

North Dakota Highway 13 (ND 13) is a 202-mile (325 km) long highway that serves southeast North Dakota. For the most part, the highway is a rural 2-lane road, but for the final 12 miles (19 km) east of I-29 it is a four-lane divided road. Its eastern terminus is located at its junction with ND 210. The western terminus is located at ND 1804 about 13 miles (21 km) west of Linton and about 50 miles (80 km) south of Bismarck.

Route description

North Dakota Highway 13 has its western terminus in Emmons County with ND 1804 and travels east about thirteen miles before entering Linton and beginning a concurrency with US 83. This concurrency is entirely within the Linton city limits, and after the highway leaves Linton, ND 13 travels east to the McIntosh county line. About five miles east of the county line, ND 13 starts a concurrency with ND 3. This concurrency travels about ten miles east to Wishek, where the highways part and ND 3 heads south. ND 13 then travels about eleven miles northeast to Lehr. In Lehr, the highway serves as the southern terminus of ND 30. A short distance northeast of Lehr, ND 13 travels along the McIntosh-Logan county line for about nine miles before curving northeast and into Logan County.

Northeast of here is the start of a concurrency with ND 56. The concurrency heads three miles east and enters LaMoure County. Still concurrent, ND 13 and ND 56 travel four miles east before ND 56 heads south to Kulm and ND 13 heads north and east to the city of Edgeley. In Edgeley, ND 13 intersects US 281. After this intersection, the highway heads eighteen miles due east to LaMoure. After traveling six miles east, the highway curves to the east-northeast for about five miles to parallel nearby railroad tracks. The highway reaches Verona and begins a concurrency with ND 1. The concurrency heads due south for six miles before heading west along the LaMoure-Dickey county line for about half of a mile. After this, the highways curve south once more and enter Dickey County. ND 13's concurrency with ND 1 continues southward for four miles, then ND 1 continues to head south toward Oakes, while ND 13 forks to the east and travels to Gwinner, entering Sargent County in the process. Just east of Gwinner, ND 13 is concurrent with ND 32 for a mile east. ND 13 travels eight miles east of this concurrency, then a mile north and about a mile and a half northeast to reach the southeast corner of Milnor. ND 13 then travel east to the Richland county line.

About six miles east of the county line, ND 13 intersects ND 18 in Wyndmere. A few miles east of Wyndmere is the small community of Barney. East of Barney is the city of Mooreton and east of Mooreton, ND 13 intersects Interstate 29 and US 81. From the I-29/US 81 interchange to the highway's eastern terminus at its interchange with ND 210 in Wahpeton, a stretch of twelve miles, ND 13 is a divided four-lane highway.

Major intersections

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References

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External links

  • The North Dakota Highways Page by Chris Geelhart
  • North Dakota Signs by Mark O'Neil
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