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North Haven, Maine

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North Haven, Maine

North Haven, Maine
Town
Harborfront and ferry terminal, 2005
Harborfront and ferry terminal, 2005
North Haven, Maine is located in Maine
North Haven, Maine
North Haven, Maine
Location within the state of Maine
Coordinates:
Country United States
State Maine
County Knox
Incorporated 1846
Area[1]
 • Total 82.49 sq mi (213.65 km2)
 • Land 11.62 sq mi (30.10 km2)
 • Water 70.87 sq mi (183.55 km2)
Elevation 0 ft (0 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 355
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 352
 • Density 30.6/sq mi (11.8/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 04853
Area code(s) 207
FIPS code 23-51620
GNIS feature ID 0582633

North Haven is a town in Knox County, Maine, United States, in Penobscot Bay. The town is both a year-round island community and a prominent summer colony. The population was 355 at the 2010 census. North Haven is accessed by three-times daily ferry service from Rockland, or by air taxi from Knox County Regional Airport.

History

As early as 3300 BC, the island was visited by the [4]

Settled in the 1760s, North Haven was originally the North Island of Vinalhaven, from which it was set off and incorporated on June 30, 1846 as Fox Isle. It was changed to North Haven on July 13, 1847. An act was passed by the state legislature in 1850 which gave the majority of island inhabitants "the right to have such roads as they deemed fit." The majority thereupon decided to have no roads at all, or else roads obstructed with gates or bars at the discretion of landowners. Not surprisingly, the minority of inhabitants petitioned to amend the act.[5]

[4]

The southern side of the Fox Islands Thoroughfare is often informally considered part of North Haven, since Vinalhaven's north shore is nearly a dozen miles from that community's town center. In contrast to Vinalhaven, North Haven's economy relies less on the lobster industry and more on sustaining its summer resort community. Energy for the community is partially provided by the wind project in Vinalhaven through the Fox Island Electric Cooperative.[6] Although the island is a popular destination, it actually provides few tourist amenities—two inns, a grocery store, two seasonal restaurants, a pizza shop, and two gift shops—and is instead geared toward those with vacation homes on the island.

Interestingly, a small population of Mouflon sheep (native to Europe and western Asia) escaped from an animal enclosure owned by Thomas Watson, Jr. on the island in the 1990s and still survive there.

North Haven Dinghy

In 1885, William Weld challenged the yachtsmen of North Haven to a race. He used the tender from his yacht Gitana and unsuccessfully raced against a variety of sprit-sailed boats. That winter he went home and had a better dinghy designed and built in Salem, Massachusetts. The next year he beat all contenders. The boat was hauled out at North Haven, and two copies were made by Henry Calderwood. The subsequent race was between Mrs. Cobb, Miss Spencer and Miss Hayward. The first boats had sprit rigs, but this soon gave way to gaff rigs. In 1888, James Osman Brown built four more dinghies. This was at the beginning of J. O. Brown & Sons boatyard. The racing fleet grew over the years. They are still raced out of North Haven, making them the oldest continuously raced one-design in the United States.[7]

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 82.49 square miles (213.65 km2), of which, 11.62 square miles (30.10 km2) of it is land and 70.87 square miles (183.55 km2) is water.[1] At its widest points, the island of North Haven is roughly 12 miles (19 km) long and 3 miles (4.8 km) wide. It is situated in Penobscot Bay and the Gulf of Maine, part of the Atlantic Ocean.

Demographics

2010 census

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 355 people, 165 households, and 105 families residing in the town. The population density was 30.6 inhabitants per square mile (11.8/km2). There were 515 housing units at an average density of 44.3 per square mile (17.1/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 96.9% White, 0.3% African American, 0.3% Asian, 0.6% from other races, and 2.0% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.3% of the population.

There were 165 households of which 23.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.1% were married couples living together, 11.5% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.0% had a male householder with no wife present, and 36.4% were non-families. 29.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.15 and the average family size was 2.62.

The median age in the town was 44.5 years. 20% of residents were under the age of 18; 5.6% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 25.9% were from 25 to 44; 29.1% were from 45 to 64; and 19.4% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the town was 52.4% male and 47.6% female.

2000 census

As of the census[8] of 2000, there were 381 people, 162 households, and 109 families residing in the town. The population density was 32.7 people per square mile (12.6/km²). There were 488 housing units at an average density of 41.9 per square mile (16.2/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 95.28% White, 1.05% African American, 3.15% from other races, and 0.52% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.36% of the population.

There were 162 households out of which 29.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.4% were married couples living together, 4.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.7% were non-families. 27.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.35 and the average family size was 2.86.

In the town the population was spread out with 25.2% under the age of 18, 5.2% from 18 to 24, 30.2% from 25 to 44, 27.0% from 45 to 64, and 12.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 103.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 112.7 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $40,446, and the median income for a family was $42,361. Males had a median income of $31,071 versus $16,000 for females. The per capita income for the town was $17,112. About 4.4% of families and 7.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.8% of those under age 18 and 6.3% of those age 65 or over.

Education

North Haven is unusual among Maine island communities for offering a K–12 school whereas most islands only have elementary schools and tuition their high school students to high schools on the mainland (Vinalhaven, Mount Desert Island, and Islesboro are the only other islands to offer K–12 education).

Notable people

North Haven and the Fox Islands Thoroughfare viewed from Rockland

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010".  
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder".  
  3. ^ "Population Estimates".  
  4. ^ a b A Brief History of North Haven, Maine
  5. ^ a b Coolidge, Austin J.; John B. Mansfield (1859). A History and Description of New England. Boston, Massachusetts. p. 236. 
  6. ^ Borst, Alan. Community Wind: Maine island community lowering energy costs with wind-power project. Rural Cooperatives. March/April 2010.
  7. ^ History of the North Haven Dinghy
  8. ^ "American FactFinder".  
  9. ^ https://rsc.byu.edu/archived/banner-gospel-wilford-woodruff/1-images-wilford-woodruffs-life-photographic-journey

External links

  • Town of North Haven, Maine
  • North Haven Library
  • North Haven Conservation Partners
  • Island Dirt - News and Events from North Haven
  • Maine Genealogy: North Haven, Knox County, Maine
  • North Haven Island Maine overview

Sites of interest

  • Calderwood Hall Gallery
  • Goose Rocks Light
  • North Haven Conservation Partners
  • North Haven Historical Society & Museum
  • Waterman's Community Center -- North Haven Arts & Enrichment

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