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Northeast United States

 

Northeast United States


This article is about the geographical region. For for other uses of the term, see Northeastern United States (disambiguation).

The Northeastern United States, or simply the Northeast, is a geographical region of the United States bounded to the north by Canada, to the east by the Atlantic Ocean, to the south by the Southern United States, and to the west by the Midwestern United States. The Northeast is one of the four regions defined by the Census Bureau for the collection and analysis of statistics.[1] The Census Bureau-defined region has a total area of 181,324 sq mi (469,630 km2) with 162,257 sq mi (420,240 km2) of that being land mass.[2] Though lacking a unified cultural identity, the Northeastern region is the nation's most economically developed, densely populated, and culturally diverse.[3][4] As of the 2010 Census, the Northeast is the second most urbanized of the four U.S. Census Regions.[5]

Composition

The Census Bureau has defined the Northeast region as comprising nine states: the New England states of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont; and the Mid-Atlantic states of New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania.[1]Template:Efn This definition has been essentially unchanged since 1880, and is widely used as a standard for data tabulation.[6][7][8][9] The Census Bureau has acknowledged the limitations of this definition[10] and the potential merits of a proposal created after the 1950 census that would include changing regional boundaries to include Delaware, Maryland, and the District of Columbia with the Mid-Atlantic states, but ultimately decided that "the new system did not win enough overall acceptance among data users to warrant adoption as an official new set of general-purpose State groupings. The previous development of many series of statistics, arranged and issued over long periods of time on the basis of the existing State groupings, favored the retention of the summary units of the current regions and divisions."[11] The Census Bureau confirmed in 1994 that it would continue to "review the components of the regions and divisions to ensure that they continue to represent the most useful combinations of States and State equivalents."[11] Many organizations and reference works follow the Census Bureau's definition for the region,[12][13][14] however, other entities define the Northeastern United States in significantly different ways for various purposes.


The Library of Congress, in one of the broadest definitions, includes all the states east of Mississippi River and north of the Ohio and Potomac Rivers, which includes the Census Bureau-defined states plus Delaware, Maryland, the District of Columbia, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, and Wisconsin.[15] The narrowest definitions include only the states of New England.[16] Other more restrictive definitions include New England and New York as part of the Northeast United States, but exclude Pennsylvania and New Jersey.[17][18] States beyond the Census Bureau definition that other entities include in the Northeast United States are:

History

Indigenous peoples

Anthropologists recognize the "Northeastern Woodlands" as one of the cultural regions that existed in the Western Hemisphere upon the arrival of Western settlers in the 15th century. The cultural area, known as the "Eastern Woodlands" in addition to covering the entire Northeast U.S., also covered much of what is now Canada and others regions of what is now the eastern United States.[31] Among the tribes that inhabited this area were those that made up the Iroquois nations and the Algonquian peoples.[32] There are now 18 federally recognized tribes in the Northeast.[33]

Colonial history

All of the states making up the Northeastern region were among the original Thirteen Colonies, though Maine and Vermont were part of other colonies before the United States became independent in the American Revolution. The two cultural and geographic regions that form parts of the Northeastern region have distinct histories.

New England

The first Europeans to settle New England were Pilgrims from England, who landed in present-day Massachusetts in 1620.[34] The Pilgrims arrived by the Mayflower and founded Plymouth Colony so they could practice religion freely.[34] Ten years later, a larger group of Puritans settled north of Plymouth Colony in Boston to form Massachusetts Bay Colony.[35] In 1636, colonists established Connecticut Colony and Providence Plantations.[36][37] Providence was founded by Roger Williams, who was banished by Massachusetts for his beliefs in freedom of religion, and it was the first colony to guarantee all citizens freedom of worship.[37] Anne Hutchinson, who was also banished by Massachusetts, formed the town of Portsmouth.[37] Providence, Portsmouth, and two other towns consolidated to form the Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.[37]

Although the first settlers of New England were motivated by religion, in more recent history, New England has become one of the least religious parts of the United States. In a 2009 Gallup survey, less than half of residents in Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine, and Massachusetts reported religion as an important part of their daily life.[38] In a 2010 Gallup survey, less than 30% of residents in Vermont, New Hampshire Maine, and Massachusetts reported attending church weekly, giving them the lowest church attendance among U.S. states.[39]

New England played a prominent role in early American education. Starting in the 17th century, the larger towns in New England opened grammar schools, the forerunner of the modern high school. The first public school in the English colonies was the Boston Latin School, founded in 1635.[40] In 1636, the colonial legislature of Massachusetts founded Harvard College, the oldest institution of higher learning in the United States.[41]

Mid-Atlantic

Henry Hudson explored the area of present-day New York in 1609 and claimed it for the Netherlands. His journey stimulated Dutch interest, and the area became known as New Netherland. In 1625, the city of New Amsterdam (the location of present-day New York City) was designated the capital of the province.[42] The Dutch New Netherland settlement along the Hudson River and, for a time, the New Sweden settlement along the Delaware River divided the English settlements in the north and the south. In 1664, Charles II of England formally annexed New Netherland and incorporated it into the English colonial empire.[43] The territory became the colonies of New York and New Jersey.[43] New Jersey was originally split into East Jersey and West Jersey until the two were united as a royal colony in 1702.[43]

In 1681, William Penn, who wanted to give Quakers a land of religious freedom, founded Pennsylvania and extended freedom of religion to all citizens.[44]

Environment

Topography

While most of the Northeastern United States lie in the Appalachian Highlands physio-graphic region, some are also part of the Atlantic coastal plain which extends south to the southern tip of Florida. The coastal plain areas (including Cape Cod in Massachusetts, Long Island in New York, most of New Jersey, Delaware, and the Chesapeake Bay region of Maryland) are generally low and flat, with sandy soil and marshy land.[4] The highlands, including the Piedmont and the Appalachian Mountains, are generally heavily forested, ranging from rolling hills to summits greater than 5,000 feet (1,500 m), and pocked with many lakes.[4] The highest peak in the Northeast is Mount Washington (New Hampshire), at 6,288 feet (1,917 m).[45]

Land use

As of 2007, forest-use covered approximately 60% of the Northeastern states (including Delaware, Maryland, and the District of Columbia), about twice the national average. About 12% was cropland and another 4% grassland pasture or range. There is also more urbanized land in the Northeast (11%) than any other region in the U.S.[23]

Climate

The climate of the Northeastern United States is impacted by the position of the mountain ranges and lakes, as well as the proximity of the Atlantic Ocean. During the winter, a prevailing westerly flow of air masses combines with the polar jet stream to bring bitter cold and frequent storm systems to the region. A semi-permanent high pressure system over the subtropical Atlantic Ocean causes summers to be generally warm and humid.[46] Average annual temperatures range from the 50s and 60s in the far southern and coastal areas to the 20s and 30s in the far northern and mountainous areas.[46] According to the Northeast Regional Climate Center, the average January temperature in its twelve-state region is 23.6 °F (−4.7 °C), with 3.07 inches (78 mm) of precipitation.[47] This compares to July, when the regional average temperature is 69.9 °F (21.1 °C), with 4.25 inches (108 mm) of precipitation.[48]

Wildlife

The Northeast has 72 National Wildlife Refuges, encompassing more than 500,000 acres (780 sq mi; 2,000 km2) of habitat, and designed to protect some of the 92 different threatened and endangered species living in the region.[33]

Demography


As of the 2010 Census, the population of the region totaled 55,317,240.[49] With an average of more than 300 people per square mile, the Northeast is more than twice as densely populated as the second-most urbanized region, the Southeast.[46] Approximately 20% of the nation's population lives in the Northeast, which comprises only about 5% of the nation's total area.[4] Since the last century, the U.S. population has been shifting away from the Northeast (and Midwest) toward the South and West.[50]

Below are the ten most populous metropolitan statistical areas, and the ten largest cities of the Census Bureau-defined region. Several of these cities in a narrow strip along the seaboard comprise the backbone of the Northeast Megalopolis.[51][52]

Rank Metropolitan Area State(s) and/or Territory 2010 Census Population
1 New York CT, NJ, NY, PA 18,897,109
2 Philadelphia DE, MD, NJ, PA 5,965,343
3 Boston MA, NH, RI 4,552,402
4 Pittsburgh PA 2,356,285
5 Providence MA, RI 1,600,852
6 Hartford CT 1,212,381
7 Buffalo NY 1,135,509
8 Rochester NY 1,054,323
9 Bridgeport CT 933,835
10 Worcester MA 923,762
[53]
Rank City State(s) and/or Territory 2010 Census Population
1 New York City NY 8,175,133
2 Philadelphia PA 1,526,006
3 Boston MA 617,594
4 Pittsburgh PA 305,704
5 Newark NJ 277,140
6 Buffalo NY 261,310
7 Jersey City NJ 247,597
8 Rochester NY 210,565
9 Yonkers NY 195,976
10 Worcester MA 182,669
[54]

Politics

The Northeastern United States tended to vote Republican in federal elections through the first half of the 20th century, but the region has since shifted to become the most Democratic in the nation.[21] Results from a 2008 Gallup poll indicated that eight of the top ten Democratic states were located in the region, with every Northeastern state having a Democratic party affiliation advantage of at least ten points.[55] The following table demonstrates Democratic support in the Northeast as compared to the remainder of the nation.[56]

Year % President vote % Senate seats % House seats
Northeast Remainder Northeast Remainder Northeast Remainder
2000 57.6 47.5 60.0 46.3 59.6 45.7
2002     60.0 45.0 58.3 44.7
2004 57.1 47.3 60.0 40.0 59.5 43.0
2006     75.0 45.0 73.8 48.3
2008 60.7 52.0 80.0 52.5 81.0 52.9
2010     75.0 47.5 67.9 38.5

The following table of United States presidential election results since 1900 illustrates that over the past six presidential elections, only one Northeastern state supported a Republican candidate (New Hampshire voted for George W. Bush in 2000).[57] Bolded entries indicate that party's candidate also won the general election.

State 1900 1904 1908 1912 1916 1920 1924 1928 1932 1936 1940 1944 1948 1952 1956 1960 1964 1968 1972 1976 1980 1984 1988 1992 1996 2000 2004 2008 2012
CT R R R D R R R R R D D D R R R D D D R R R R R D D D D D D
DE R R R D R R R R R D D D R R R D D R R D R R R D D D D D D
DC                                 D D D D D D D D D D D D D
ME R R R D D R R R R R R R R R R R D D R R R R R D D D D D D
MD R D D D D R R R D D D D R R R D D D R D D R R D D D D D D
MA R R R D R R R D D D D D D R R D D D D D R R D D D D D D D
NH R R R D D R R R R D D D R R R R D R R R R R R D D R D D D
NJ R R R D R R R R D D D D R R R D D R R R R R R D D D D D D
NY R R R D R R R R D D D D R R R D D D R D R R D D D D D D D
PA R R R P R R R R R D D D R R R D D D R D R R R D D D D D D
RI R R R D R R R D D D D D D R R D D D R D D R D D D D D D D
VT R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R D R R R R R R D D D D D D

The following table shows the breakdown of party affiliation of governors, state legislative houses, and U.S. congressional delegation for the Northeastern states, as of 2010.[58] (Demographics reflect registration-by-party figures from that state's registered voter statistics.)

State Governor Upper House Majority Lower House Majority Senior U.S. Senator Junior U.S. Senator U.S. House Delegation Demographics
CT Democratic Democratic
22-14
Democratic
98-53
Democratic Democratic Democratic
5-0
Democratic
37-20
DE Democratic Democratic
13-8
Democratic
27-14
Democratic Democratic Democratic
1-0
Democratic
47-29
ME Republican Democratic
19-15-1
Democratic
89-58-4
Republican Independent Democratic
2-0
Democratic
33-28
MD Democratic Democratic
35-12
Democratic
98-43
Democratic Democratic Democratic
7-1
Democratic
56-27
MA Democratic Democratic
36-4
Democratic
131-29
Democratic Democratic Democratic
9-0
Democratic
37-11
NH Democratic Republican
13-11
Democratic
221-179
Democratic Republican Democratic
2-0
Tied
29-29
NJ Republican Democratic
24-16
Democratic
48-32
Democratic Democratic Tied
6-6
Democratic
33-20
NY Democratic Coalition
36-27
Democratic
105-44-1
Democratic Democratic Democratic
21-6
Democratic
49-25
PA Republican Republican
27-23
Republican
110-93
Democratic Republican Republican
13-5
Democratic
51-37
RI Democratic Democratic
32-5-1
Democratic
69-6
Democratic Democratic Democratic
2-0
Democratic
38-11
VT Democratic Democratic
23-7
Democratic
98-44-8
Democratic Independent Democratic
1-0
Democratic
29-27

Economy

As of 2012, the region accounts for approximately 23% of U.S. gross domestic product.[59]

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission oversees 34 nuclear reactors, eight for research or testing and 26 for power production in the Northeastern United States.[22]

New York City, considered a global financial center, is in the Northeast.

The Federal Bureau of Prisons maintains 17 federal prisons and two affiliated private facilities in the region.[29]

Culture

Geographer Wilbur Zelinsky has noted that the Northeast region lacks a unified cultural identity,[3] but has served as a "culture hearth" for the rest of the nation.[60] Several much smaller geographical regions within the Northeast do have their own cultural identity.[3]

Landmarks

Almost half of the National Historic Landmarks maintained by the National Park Service are located in the Northeastern United States.[61]

Religion

According to a 2009 Gallup poll, the Northeastern states differ from most of the rest of the U.S. in religious preference. Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey are the only states in the nation where Catholics outnumber Protestants and other Christian denominations, while more than 20% of respondents in Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont declared no religious identity.[62]

Sports

The Northeast region is home to 22 professional sports franchises in the "Big Four" leagues (NFL, NBA, NHL and MLB),[63] with more than 110 championships collectively among them.[64] The region has also been noted for the relative prevalence of the traditionally Northeastern sports of hockey and lacrosse.[65]

See also

Notes

Template:Notelist

References

Coordinates: 42°N 73°W / 42°N 73°W / 42; -73

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