Office park

Not to be confused with Industrial park.
For a property containing a group of businesses, see serviced office.


A business park or office park is an area of land in which many office buildings are grouped together. All of the work that goes on is commercial, not industrial or residential.

These are popular in many suburban locations, where development is cheaper because of the lower land costs and the lower building costs for building wider, not necessarily higher. They are also often located near motorways or main roads.

Criticism

The impact of these areas on the urban fabric has been criticized by conservatives:

  • Spaces escape the control of the built realm: voids between fragments of unconnected residential schemes, gaps between urbanized zones, abandoned farmland, etc. A new approach to spacial organization arises with the ease that characterizes any new consumer good, an approach which questions the conventional references of urbanism: the so-called 'commercial, industrial, business and theme park'.
  • The urbanized park originally sprang the hybridization of the garden-city and Anglo-Saxon university campus models. It adopted the former's low-rise buildings and attention to free spaces as a way of shaping the environment, and the latter's autonomous constructions. In sum, parks are thematic precincts of autonomous architectural set pieces arranged around parking lots and communal services, and are situated at the most accessible points of the metropolitan road network.
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List of Major Business Parks


See also

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