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Ohio's at-large congressional district

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Title: Ohio's at-large congressional district  
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Subject: List of United States Representatives from Ohio, United States congressional delegations from Ohio, George H. Bender, Jeremiah Morrow, 74th United States Congress
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Ohio's at-large congressional district

Ohio's At-large congressional district existed from 1803 to 1813, from 1913 to 1915, from 1933 to 1953 and from 1963 until 1967, when it was banned by the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

From statehood in 1803 until the 1813 redistricting following the 1810 census, Ohio had only one member of the United States House of Representatives: Jeremiah Morrow.

List of representatives

Cong
ress
Years Representative Party Electoral history
8 October 17, 1803 –
March 3, 1813
Jeremiah Morrow Democratic-
Republican
First elected in 1803
9 Re-elected in 1804
10 Re-elected in 1806
11 Re-elected in 1808
12 Re-elected in 1810
Retired to run for U.S. Senate

After the 1810 census, the at-large seat was eliminated. It was reinstated after the 1910 census.

Cong
ress
Years Representative Party Electoral history
63 March 4, 1913 –
March 3, 1915
Robert Crosser Democratic Elected in 1912
Redistricted to the 21st district

From the 1930 census to the 1940 census, there were two seats elected at-large, on a general ticket.

Cong
ress
Years Seat one Seat two
Representative Party Electoral history Representative Party Electoral history
73 March 4, 1933 –
March 3, 1935
Charles V. Truax Democratic First elected in 1932 Stephen M. Young Democratic First elected in 1932
74 March 4, 1935 –
August 9, 1935
Re-elected in 1934
Died
Re-elected in 1934
Retired to run for Governor
August 9, 1935 –
November 3, 1936
Vacant
November 3, 1936 –
January 3, 1937
Daniel S. Earhart Democratic Retired
75 January 3, 1937 –
January 3, 1939
John McSweeney Democratic Elected in 1936
Lost re-election
Harold G. Mosier Democratic Elected in 1936
Lost renomination
76 January 3, 1939 –
January 3, 1941
George H. Bender Republican First elected in 1938 L. L. Marshall Republican Elected in 1938
Lost re-election
77 January 3, 1941 –
January 3, 1943
Re-elected in 1940 Stephen M. Young Democratic Elected in 1940
Lost re-election
78 January 3, 1943 –
January 3, 1945
Re-elected in 1942 Seat two was eliminated after the 1940 census.
79 January 3, 1945 –
January 3, 1947
Re-elected in 1944
80 January 3, 1947 –
January 3, 1949
Re-elected in 1946
Lost re-election
81 January 3, 1949 –
January 3, 1951
Stephen M. Young Democratic Elected in 1948
Lost re-election
82 January 3, 1951 –
January 3, 1953
George H. Bender Republican Elected in 1950
Redistricted to the 23rd district

In 1953, the seat was eliminated. It was restored in 1963.

Cong
ress
Years Representative Party Electoral history
88 January 3, 1963 –
January 3, 1965
Robert Taft, Jr. Republican Elected in 1962
Retired to run for U.S. Senate
89 January 3, 1965 –
January 3, 1967
Robert E. Sweeney Democratic Elected in 1964
Retired to run for Ohio Attorney General

In 1967, the seat was eliminated.

Recent election results

The following chart shows historic election results. Bold type indicates victor. Italic type indicates incumbent.

Year Democratic Republican Other
From 1933 to 1941, there were two seats elected at large, on a general ticket. All the candidates ran in one race and the top two vote-getters won the two seats.
1932 Charles V. Truax: 1,206,631
Stephen M. Young: 1,200,946
George H. Bender: 1,109,562
L. T. Palmer: 1,102,567
Edward R. Stafford (P): 24,625
Alfred H. Stratton (P): 17,844
John Rehms (C): 7,050
William Hughey (C): 6,010
1934 Charles V. Truax : 1,061,857
Stephen M. Young (inc.): 1,050,089
George H. Bender: 905,233
L. L. Marshall: 871,432
Ben Atkins (C): 13,972
John Marshall (C): 13,808
1936
(Special)[1]
Daniel S. Earhart: 1,479,284[2] Benson Ogier: 1,057,473
1936 John McSweeney: 1,553,059
Harold G. Mosier: 1,493,152
George H. Bender: 1,226,147
L. L. Marshall: 1,121,370
William C. Sandberg (C): 8,947
1938 John McSweeney (inc.): 1,068,916
Stephen M. Young: 1,015,041
√ George H. Bender: 1,177,982
L. L. Marshall: 1,101,193
 
1940 Stephen M. Young: 1,483,879
Francis W. Durbin: 1,384,745
√ George H. Bender (inc.): 1,519,559
L. L. Marshall (inc.): 1,386,627
 
From 1943 through 1953 there was one member of the House from Ohio elected at large.
1942 Stephen M. Young:[3] 717,692 √ George H. Bender (inc.): 945,995  
1944 William Glass: 1,362,843 √ George H. Bender (inc.): 1,542,422  
1946 William M. Boyd: 871,660 √ George H. Bender (inc.): 1,281,864  
1948 Stephen M. Young: 1,455,972 George H. Bender (inc.): 1,342,388  
1950 Stephen M. Young (inc.): 1,237,409 √ George H. Bender: 1,447,154  
From 1953 through 1963, the at-large seat became the 23rd district. The at-large seat was created again after the 1960 census.
1962 Richard D. Kennedy: 1,164,628 Robert Taft (Jr.): 1,786,018  
1964 Robert E. Sweeney: 1,872,351 Oliver P. Bolton: 1,716,480  

References

  1. ^ Truax died in office in 1935.
  2. ^ http://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=443573
  3. ^ Young held an incumbency in the second at-large seat, which was eliminated for the 1942 election . Thus, there were two incumbents vying for this seat.
  • Martis, Kenneth C. (1989). The Historical Atlas of Political Parties in the United States Congress. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company. 
  • Martis, Kenneth C. (1982). The Historical Atlas of United States Congressional Districts. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company. 
  • Congressional Biographical Directory of the United States 1774–present
  • "Ohio's at-large congressional district". OurCampaigns.com. 

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