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Ong Kommandam

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Title: Ong Kommandam  
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Subject: Khom script, Laotian people, Ong Keo, Alak people, Oi language
Collection: 1936 Deaths, Creators of Writing Systems, Guerrillas Killed in Action, Laotian People, Year of Birth Missing
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Ong Kommandam

Ong Kommandam (also Ong Kommadam) was the confidant and successor of Ong Keo as the leader of the Mon-Khmer tribes of southern Laos in their struggle for independence from French and Lao rule. Ong Keo was assassinated in 1910 by the Commissioner of Salavan, Jacques Dauplay. Kommandam survived the attack, which added to his status, and he quickly picked up the struggle for independence with great success, uniting the highland minorities of Southern Laos. An ethnic Alak, he claimed that the "Khom" (a general term for the Mon-Khmer hill tribes) were indigenous to the area and previously held much more prestige and glory, first when the Khmer Empire ruled them, and later when they were a part of the Kingdom of Lan Xang. As part of his resistance activities, he invented a secret script to convey messages, the Khom script.[1] He continued the fight for independence from 1910 until 1936 when he was killed.

References

  • Gunn, Geoffrey (1990). Rebellion in Laos: peasant and politics in a colonial backwater. Boulder: Westview Press.
  • Moppert, François (1981). Le révolte des Bolovens (1901–1936). In Histoire de l’Asie du Sud-est: Révoltes, Réformes, Révolutions, Pierre Brocheux (ed.), 47-62. Lille: Presses Universitaires de Lille.
  • Polsena, Vatthana; 2006; Post-war Laos: The Politics of Culture, History, And Identity; Cornell University Press; ISBN 0801445035; pp 121–138


References

  1. ^ Sidwell, Paul. 2008. The Khom script of the Kommodam Rebellion. International Journal of the Sociology of Language 192.
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