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Oregon's 4th congressional district

Oregon's 4th congressional district
Oregon's 4th congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
Oregon's 4th congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
Current Representative
Area 17,181 mi2 (44,499 km2)
Distribution 69.17% urban, 30.83% rural
Population (2000) 684,280
Median income $35,796
Ethnicity 91.7% White#if: 0.5, 1.5% Asian, 4.2% Hispanic, 0.2% Native American, 0.2% other
Occupation 28.2% blue collar, 55.2% white collar, 16.5% gray collar
Cook PVI D+2[1]

Oregon's 4th congressional district represents the southern half of Oregon's coastal counties, including Coos, Curry, Douglas, Lane, and Linn counties and most of Benton and Josephine counties.

The district has been represented by Democrat Peter A. DeFazio since 1987.

List of representatives

Representative Party Years District home Notes
District created January 3, 1943
Harris Ellsworth Republican January 3, 1943 –
January 3, 1957
Roseburg
Charles O. Porter Democratic January 3, 1957 –
January 3, 1961
Eugene
Edwin R. Durno Republican January 3, 1961 –
January 3, 1963
Medford Retired to run for U.S. Senate
Robert B. Duncan Democratic January 3, 1963 –
January 3, 1967
Medford Retired to run for U.S. Senate
John R. Dellenback Republican January 3, 1967 –
January 3, 1975
Medford
James H. Weaver Democratic January 3, 1975 –
January 3, 1987
Eugene Retired to run for U.S. Senate
Peter A. DeFazio Democratic January 3, 1987 –
present
Springfield Incumbent

Election results

Sources (official results only):

2012

United States House election, 2012: Oregon District 4
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Peter DeFazio 208,196 59.1
Republican Art Robinson 138,351 39.2
Libertarian Chuck Huntting 6,205 1.7
Misc. Misc. 468 0.1

2010

United States House election, 2010: Oregon District 4
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Peter DeFazio 162,416 54.49
Republican Art Robinson 129,877 43.58
Misc. Misc. 544 0.18

2008

United States House election, 2008: Oregon District 4
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Peter DeFazio 275,143 82.34
Misc. Misc. 2,708 0.81

2006

United States House election, 2006: Oregon District 4
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Peter DeFazio 180,607 62.23
Republican Jim Feldkamp 109,105 37.59
Misc. Misc. 532 0.18

2004

United States House election, 2004: Oregon District 4
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Peter DeFazio 228,611 60.98
Republican Jim Feldkamp 140,882 37.58
Libertarian Jacob Boone 3,190 0.85
Misc. Misc. 427 0.01

2002

United States House election, 2002: Oregon District 4
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Peter DeFazio 168,150 63.86
Republican Liz VanLeeuwen 90,523 34.36
Libertarian Chris Bigelow 4,602 1.75
Misc. Misc. 206 0.01

2000

United States House election, 2000: Oregon District 4
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Peter DeFazio 197,998 68.03
Republican John Lindsey 88,950 30.56
Misc. Misc. 421 0.14

1998

United States House election, 1998: Oregon District 4
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Peter DeFazio 157,524 70.12
Republican Steve J. Webb 64,143 28.55
Misc. Misc. 276 0.12

1996

United States House election, 1996: Oregon District 4
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Peter DeFazio 177,270 65.69
Misc. Misc. 4,374 1.62

In popular culture

It is revealed in the season 7 opener of The West Wing that main character Will Bailey eventually gets elected to the U.S. House of Representatives, serving the people of the Oregon's 4th congressional district. In his service, he is a member of the Ways and Means Committee.

Historical district boundaries

2003 - 2013
The district gained most of Josephine County from the 2nd district in the 2002 redistricting, but also lost most of the Grants Pass area to the second district.[2][4]

See also

References

  1. ^
  2. ^
  • Congressional Biographical Directory of the United States 1774–present


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