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Pamela McCorduck

Pamela McCorduck
Born Pamela McCorduck
1940 (age 74–75)
Liverpool, England[1]
Occupation Non-fiction writer, Journalist
Nationality American
Period 1979–present
Notable works Machines Who Think (1979, 2004)
The Fifth Generation (1983) (with Edward Feigenbaum)
Spouse Joseph F. Traub

Pamela McCorduck (born 1940) is an American author of a number of books concerning the history and philosophical significance of artificial intelligence, the future of engineering and the role of women and technology. She is also the author of three novels. She is a contributor to Omni, The New York Times, Daedalus, the Michigan Quarterly Review and is a contributing editor of Wired. She is a former vice president of the PEN American Center.

Selected works

  • Machines Who Think (1st ed.). W. H. Freeman. 1979. 
  • The Universal Machine: Confessions of a Technological Optimist. San Diego: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. 1986.  
  • AARON's Code : Meta-art, Artificial Intelligence, and the work of Harold Cohen. New York: W.H. Freeman. 1997.  
  • Machines Who Think: A Personal Inquiry into the History and Prospects of Artificial Intelligence (2nd ed.). Natick, Mass.: A.K. Peters. 2004.  
  • The Edge of Chaos : a novel. Santa Fe: Sunstone Press. 2007.  
  • Bounded Rationality : a novel. Santa Fe: Sunstone Press. 2012.  
With Edward Feigenbaum
  • The Fifth Generation: Artificial Intelligence and Japan's Computer Challenge to the World. Reading, Mass.: Michael Joseph. 1983.  
With Nancy Ramsey
  • The Futures of Women : Scenarios for the 21st Century. New York: Warner Books. 1997.  

Notes

  1. ^ Personal communication, Pamela McCorduck

References

  • "Pamela McCorduck". 
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