Paul burling

Paul Burling
Born (1970-05-21) 21 May 1970 (age 44)
Medium Stand-up
Nationality British
Years active 1985-present (On Hiatus: 2010—)
Genres Impressions
Influences Harry Hill
Spouse Divorced - 3 children
Notable works and roles Britain's Got Talent

Paul Burling is a British impressionist. A veteran of show business for 25 years, having worked in voiceover, radio and pantomime, he rose to national attention as a finalist of the fourth series of Britain's Got Talent. His debut television show in 2010, It's Paul Burling! attracted a television audience of 3.7 million.

Biographical details

Paul Burling comes from Bristol, is 42 and a father of three.[1][2]

Career

Burling "worked the holiday parks and comedy circuit for 25 years" before attracting nationwide attention on the fourth series of Britain's Got Talent.[3] He has worked in voiceover, for radio and in pantomime before being given his own Christmas special show by ITV, a prime-time national television spot.[4]

His role of Christmas 2010 in Jack and the Beanstalk, was his fifth pantomime season at the Central Theatre, Chatham.[5] He has also played Wishee Washee in Aladdin and Smee in Peter Pan.[6] He is co-starring with Gareth Gates in aladdin at Milton Keynes Theatre during Christmas 2011.[7] During Christmas 2011, he is co-starring with Gareth Gates in Aladdin at Milton Keynes Theatre[8]

Burling's radio work includes BBC Radio Kent, Devon and Wales, Pulse FM and Ocean FM, and he is an experienced voiceover artist.[9]

On Britain's Got Talent, Burling became particularly associated with his impression of television comic Harry Hill. His show for ITV, It's Paul Burling! aired in December 2010 to a television audience of 3.7 million viewers.[10] His expanded portfolio included impressions and satires of Allan Carr, Graham Norton, Downton Abbey, Hercule Poirot, and The X Factor. Subsequently, the iPhone 3GS made an app called "Burling's Game Booth".[11] Other TV work includes The Slammer for CBBC during 2011.[12]

He is managed by TEDTalent.[13]

References

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