World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Paul Zindel

Article Id: WHEBN0000978536
Reproduction Date:

Title: Paul Zindel  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: And Miss Reardon Drinks A Little, Runaway Train (film), Mame (film), Up the Sandbox, Pulitzer Prize for Drama
Collection: 1936 Births, 2003 Deaths, 20Th-Century American Dramatists and Playwrights, 20Th-Century American Novelists, 21St-Century American Novelists, American Chemists, American Children's Writers, American Male Dramatists and Playwrights, American Male Novelists, American Schoolteachers, American Scientists, American Writers of Young Adult Literature, Deaths from Lung Cancer, Margaret A. Edwards Award Winners, People from Staten Island, Pulitzer Prize for Drama Winners, University of Southern California Faculty, Wagner College Alumni, Writers from New York City
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Paul Zindel

Paul Zindel
Photo of Paul Zindel
Born (1936-05-15)May 15, 1936
Tottenville, Staten Island, NY
Died March 27, 2003(2003-03-27) (aged 66)
New York City, USA
Occupation Writer
Nationality American
Spouse Bonnie Hildebrand (1973-1998)
Information
Genre Drama, novels, screenplays
Debut works The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-in-the-Moon Marigolds
Notable work(s) The Pigman
Magnum opus The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-in-the-Moon Marigolds
Awards Pulitzer Prize for Drama
1971
Margaret Edwards Award
2002

Paul Zindel, Jr. (May 15, 1936 – March 27, 2003) was an American playwright, Young Adult novelist, and educator.

Contents

  • Biography 1
    • Early years 1.1
    • Career 1.2
    • Personal life 1.3
  • Works 2
    • Plays 2.1
    • Novels 2.2
      • The Zone Unknown 2.2.1
      • P.C. Hawke Mysteries 2.2.2
      • The Wacky Facts Lunch Bunch 2.2.3
      • The Pigman Trilogy 2.2.4
      • Other Novels 2.2.5
    • Short Stories 2.3
    • Screenplays 2.4
  • See also 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Biography

Early years

Zindel was born in Tottenville, Staten Island, New York to Paul Zindel, Sr., a policeman, and Betty Zindel, a nurse; his sister, Betty (Zindel) Hagen, was a year and a half older than him. Paul Zindel, Sr. ran away with his mistress when Zindel was two, leaving the trio to move around Staten Island, living in various houses and apartments.

Through his teen years he wrote plays, though he trained as a chemist at Wagner College and spent six months working at Allied Chemical as a chemical writer after graduating. Zindel took a creative writing course with the playwright Edward Albee while he was an undergraduate. He later quit and worked as a high school Chemistry teacher at Tottenville High School on Staten Island.

Career

In 1964, he wrote The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-in-the-Moon Marigolds, his first and most successful play. The play ran off-Broadway in 1970, and on Broadway in 1971, and he received the 1971 Pulitzer Prize for Drama for the work. It was also made into a 1972 movie by 20th Century Fox. Soon thereafter, Charlotte Zolotow, a vice-president at Harper & Row, contacted him about writing for her book label.

Zindel wrote a total of 53 books, all of them aimed at children or teens. Many were set in his home town of Staten Island. They tended to be semi-autobiographical, focusing on teenage misfits with abusive or neglectful parents. Zindel himself grew up in a single-parent household; his mother worked at various occupations: hat check girl, shipyard worker, dog breeder, hot dog vendor, and finally licensed practical nurse, often boarding terminally ill patients at home.[1] They moved frequently, and his mother often engaged in "get-rich-quick" schemes that did not succeed. His father abandoned them.[2] This upbringing was most closely depicted in Confessions of a Teenage Baboon.

Despite the often dark subject matter of his books, which deal with loneliness, loss, and the effects of abuse, they are also filled with humor. Many of his novels have zany titles, such as My Darling, My Hamburger, Pardon Me, You're Stepping on My Eyeball! or Confessions of a Teenage Baboon.

The Pigman, first published in 1968, is widely taught in American schools, and also made it on to the list of most frequently banned books in America in the 1990s; for example, Plano, Texas parents complained of offensive language and sexual themes.[3]

Zindel received the annual Margaret A. Edwards Award from the American Library Association in 2002, recognizing his cumulative "significant and lasting contribution to young adult literature". The jury cited five works said to be published 1968 to 1993: The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-in-the-Moon Marigolds; My Darling, My Hamburger; and the Pigman trilogy (‡). The citation called The Pigman "one of the first authentic young adult novels" and the panel chair observed that "Paul Zindel knows and understands the reality young adults deal with day-to-day ... He has the ability to depict young adults in an honest and realistic way. The characters he developed nearly 40 years ago still speak to today's teens."[4]

Beginning with Loch in 1994, Zindel wrote numerous speculative fiction novels for children or young adults, mainly in the horror genre.

Zindel also worked in Hollywood, writing the screenplays for, among other titles, Up the Sandbox and Mame.

Personal life

Zindel was married to Bonnie Hildebrand from 1973, divorcing her in 1998. They had two children; novelist and actor Lizabeth Zindel, and son David, a filmmaker. Paul Zindel died in New York City from lung cancer in 2003, at the Jacob Perlow Hospice in Beth Israel Medical Center in Manhattan. He is buried in Moravian Cemetery, Staten Island.

Works

Plays

Novels

The Zone Unknown

  • Loch, New York: HarperCollins, 1994.
  • The Doom Stone, New York: HarperCollins, 1995.
  • Raptor, New York: Hyperion, 1998.
  • Rats, New York: Hyperion, 1999.
  • Reef of Death, New York: HarperCollins, 1998.
  • Night of the Bat, New York: Hyperion, 2001.
  • The Gadget, New York: HarperCollins, 2001.

P.C. Hawke Mysteries

  • The Scream Museum, New York: Hyperion, 2001.
  • The Surfing Corpse, New York: Hyperion, 2001.
  • The E-Mail Murders, New York: Hyperion, 2001.
  • The Lethal Gorilla, New York: Hyperion, 2001.
  • The Square Root of Murder, 2002.
  • Death on the Amazon, 2002.
  • The Gourmet Zombie, 2002.
  • The Phantom of 86th Street, 2002.
  • Harry and Hortense at Hormone High, New York: Harper, 1985.

The Wacky Facts Lunch Bunch

  • Attack of the Killer Fishsticks, New York: Bantam, 1993.
  • Fifth Grade Safari, New York: Bantam, 1992.
  • Fright Party, New York: Bantam, 1993.
  • One Hundred Percent Laugh Riot, New York: Bantam, 1994.

The Pigman Trilogy

Other Novels

  • My Darling, My Hamburger, New York: Harper, 1969. ‡
  • I Never Loved Your Mind, New York: Harper, 1970.
  • I Love My Mother, New York: Harper, 1975.
  • Pardon Me, You're Stepping on My Eyeball!, New York: Harper, 1976.
  • Confessions of a Teenage Baboon, New York: Harper, 1977.
  • The Undertaker's Gone Bananas, New York: Harper, 1978.
  • A Star for the Latecomer (with Bonnie Zindel), New York: Harper, 1980.
  • The Girl Who Wanted a Boy, New York: Harper, 1981.
  • To Take a Dare (with Crescent Dragonwagon), New York: Harper, 1982.
  • The Amazing and Death-Defying Diary of Eugene Dingman, New York: Harper, 1987.
  • A Begonia for Miss Applebaum, New York: Harper, 1989.
  • David & Della, New York: HarperCollins, 1993.
  • Club de collecionistas de noticias
  • The Houdini Whodunit, 2002.
  • Death by CD, 2003.
  • The Petrified Parrot, 2003.
  • Camp Megadeath, 2003.

(‡) The young-adult librarians cited five books when Zindel won the 2002 Edwards Award.[4]

Short Stories

Screenplays

See also

References

  1. ^ Pamphlet for Lyons, Christine (1979). Paul Zindel: Marigolds & Hamburgers, Eyeballs & Baboons ( 
  2. ^ Zindel, Paul (Fall 1994). "Journey To Meet the Pigman". The Alan Review. Retrieved December 19, 2008. 
  3. ^ "The Pigman". Banned Books Project. Solonor's Inkwell (solonor.com). September 21, 2003. Retrieved December 19, 2008.  Database entry evidently for a complaint by Plano Parents Rights Council (no date).
  4. ^ a b "2002 Margaret A. Edwards Award Winner". Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA). American Library Association (ALA).
      "Edwards Award". YALSA. ALA. Retrieved 2013-10-10.

External links

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.