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Pennsylvania's 11th congressional district

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Title: Pennsylvania's 11th congressional district  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Subject: United States congressional delegations from Pennsylvania, William Findley, Lou Barletta, Paul E. Kanjorski, John J. Casey
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Pennsylvania's 11th congressional district

Pennsylvania's 11th congressional district
 Pennsylvania's 11th congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
Pennsylvania's 11th congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
Current Representative Lou Barletta (RHazleton)
Cook PVI R+6[1]

Pennsylvania's 11th congressional district is in the east-central part of the state. The district was substantially redrawn after the 2012 redistricting.

Republican Lou Barletta has represented the district since 2011, the first Republican to do so in almost 30 years.

From 2003 to 2013 it included Scranton, Wilkes-Barre, Hazleton and most of the Poconos. It was once considered a very safe Democratic seat but has become more competitive in recent years. Former longtime Democratic incumbent Paul Kanjorski faced his closest contest ever in 2008, narrowly defeating Lou Barletta, the Republican mayor of Hazleton, 138,849 to 129,358.[2] In 2010, Kanjorski fell victim to a GOP and anti-incumbent wave and was unseated by Barletta in a 45%–55% vote.[3]

Contents

  • Representatives 1
    • 1795–1823: One seat 1.1
    • 1823–1833: Two seats 1.2
    • 1833–present: One seat 1.3
  • Historical district boundaries 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Representatives

1795–1823: One seat

District created in 1795 from Pennsylvania's At-large congressional district

Cong
ress
Representative Party Years Electoral history
4 William Findley Democratic-
Republican
March 4, 1795 –
March 3, 1799
Redistricted from the at-large district
5
6 John Smilie Democratic-
Republican
March 4, 1799 –
March 3, 1803
Redistricted to the 9th district
7
8 John B. C. Lucas Democratic-
Republican
March 4, 1803 –
1805
Resigned before Congress began to become U.S. District Judge
9
9 Vacant 1805 –
November 7, 1805
9 Samuel Smith Democratic-
Republican
November 7, 1805 –
March 3, 1811
Lost re-election
10
11
12 Abner Lacock Democratic-
Republican
March 4, 1811 –
March 3, 1813
13 William Findley Democratic-
Republican
March 4, 1813 –
March 3, 1817
Redistricted from the 8th district
14
15 David Marchand Democratic-
Republican
March 4, 1817 –
March 3, 1821
16
17 George Plumer Democratic-
Republican
March 4, 1821 –
March 3, 1823
Redistricted to the 17th district

1823–1833: Two seats

Cong
ress
Years Seat A Seat B
Representative Party Electoral history Representative Party Electoral history
18 March 4, 1823 –
March 3, 1825
James Wilson Jackson Democratic-Republican Elected in 1822
Re-elected in 1824
Re-elected in 1826
John Findlay Jackson Democratic-Republican Redistricted from the 5th district and re-elected in 1822
Re-elected in 1824
Retired
19 March 4, 1825 –
March 3, 1827
Jacksonian Jacksonian
20 March 4, 1827 –
March 3, 1829
William Ramsey Jacksonian Elected in 1826
Re-elected in 1828
Re-elected in 1830
Died
21 March 4, 1829 –
March 3, 1831
Thomas H. Crawford Jacksonian Elected in 1828
Re-elected in 1830
22 March 4, 1831 –
September 29, 1831
September 29, 1831 –
November 22, 1831
Vacant
November 22, 1831 –
March 3, 1833
Robert McCoy Jacksonian Elected to finish Ransey's term in 1831

1833–present: One seat

Representative Party Years Electoral history
Charles A. Barnitz Anti-Masonic March 4, 1833 –
March 3, 1835
Henry Logan Jacksonian March 4, 1835 –
March 3, 1837
Democratic March 4, 1837 –
March 3, 1839
James Gerry Democratic March 4, 1839 –
March 3, 1843
Benjamin A. Bidlack Democratic March 4, 1843 –
March 3, 1845
Redistricted from the 15th district
Owen D. Leib Democratic March 4, 1845 –
March 3, 1847
Chester P. Butler Whig March 4, 1847 –
October 5, 1850
Died
Vacant October 5, 1850 –
January 13, 1851
John Brisbin Democratic January 13, 1851 –
March 3, 1851
Henry M. Fuller Whig March 4, 1851 –
March 3, 1853
Lost renomination
Christian M. Straub Democratic March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1855
James H. Campbell Opposition March 4, 1855 –
March 3, 1857
Lost re-election
William L. Dewart Democratic March 4, 1857 –
March 3, 1859
Lost re-election
James H. Campbell Republican March 4, 1859 –
March 3, 1863
Retired
Philip Johnson Democratic March 4, 1863 –
January 29, 1867
Redistricted from the 13th district
Died
Vacant January 29, 1867 –
March 4, 1867
Daniel M. Van Auken Democratic March 4, 1867 –
March 3, 1871
Retired
John B. Storm Democratic March 4, 1871 –
March 3, 1875
Retired
Francis D. Collins Democratic March 4, 1875 –
March 3, 1879
Robert Klotz Democratic March 4, 1879 –
March 3, 1883
John B. Storm Democratic March 4, 1883 –
March 3, 1887
Retired
Charles R. Buckalew Democratic March 4, 1887 –
March 3, 1889
Redistricted to the 17th district
Joseph A. Scranton Republican March 4, 1889 –
March 3, 1891
Lost re-election
Lemuel Amerman Democratic March 4, 1891 –
March 3, 1893
Lost re-election
Joseph A. Scranton Republican March 4, 1893 –
March 3, 1897
Retired
William Connell Republican March 4, 1897 –
March 3, 1903
Redistricted to the 10th district
Henry W. Palmer Republican March 4, 1903 –
March 3, 1907
Redistricted from the 12th district
John T. Lenahan Democratic March 4, 1907 –
March 3, 1909
Retired
Henry W. Palmer Republican March 4, 1909 –
March 4, 1911
Charles C. Bowman Republican March 4, 1911 –
December 12, 1912
Seat declared vacant, unsuccessful candidate for election.
Vacant December 12, 1912 –
March 4, 1913
John J. Casey Democratic March 4, 1913 –
March 3, 1917
Lost re-election
Thomas W. Templeton Republican March 4, 1917 –
March 3, 1919
Retired
John J. Casey Democratic March 4, 1919 –
March 3, 1921
Lost re-election
Clarence D. Coughlin Republican March 3, 1921 –
March 3, 1923
Lost re-election
Laurence H. Watres Republican March 4, 1923 –
March 3, 1931
Retired
Patrick J. Boland Democratic March 4, 1931 –
May 18, 1942
Died
Vacant May 18, 1942 –
November 3, 1942
Veronica Grace Boland Democratic November 3, 1942 –
January 3, 1943
Elected to finish her husband's term[4]
John W. Murphy Democratic January 3, 1943 –
January 3, 1945
Redistricted to the 10th district
Daniel J. Flood Democratic January 3, 1945 –
January 3, 1947
Lost re-election
Mitchell Jenkins Republican January 3, 1947 –
January 3, 1949
Retired
Daniel J. Flood Democratic January 3, 1949 –
January 3, 1953
Lost re-election
Edward J. Bonin Republican January 3, 1953 –
January 3, 1955
Lost re-election
Daniel J. Flood Democratic January 3, 1955 –
January 31, 1980
Resigned due to allegations of bribery
Vacant January 31, 1980 –
April 9, 1980
Ray Musto Democratic April 9, 1980 –
January 3, 1981
Lost re-election
James L. Nelligan Republican January 3, 1981 –
January 3, 1983
Lost re-election
Frank G. Harrison Democratic January 3, 1983 –
January 3, 1985
Lost renomination
Paul E. Kanjorski Democratic January 3, 1985 –
January 3, 2011
Lost re-election
Lou Barletta Republican January 3, 2011 –
Present
Elected in 2010

Historical district boundaries

2005 - 2013

See also

References

  1. ^ "Partisan Voting Index Districts of the 113th Congress: 2004 & 2008" (PDF). The Cook Political Report. 2012. Retrieved 2013-01-10. 
  2. ^ http://scrantontimes.com/articles/2008/11/05/news/sc_times_trib.20081105.a.pg3.tt05congress11_s1.2062365_top3.txt
  3. ^ http://www.wnep.com/news/electionresults/
  4. ^ Veronica Grace Boland was the woman in Congress from Pennsylvania.
  • Martis, Kenneth C. (1989). The Historical Atlas of Political Parties in the United States Congress. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company. 
  • Martis, Kenneth C. (1982). The Historical Atlas of United States Congressional Districts. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company. 
  • Congressional Biographical Directory of the United States 1774–present

External links

  • Congressional redistricting in Pennsylvania

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