World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Peter Apfelbaum

Article Id: WHEBN0007993301
Reproduction Date:

Title: Peter Apfelbaum  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: List of Berkeley High School (Berkeley, California) people, Apfelbaum, Barney McAll, Backing musicians for Trey Anastasio, List of jazz saxophonists
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Peter Apfelbaum

Peter Apfelbaum
Peter Apfelbaum live with the Steven Bernstein "Diaspora Suite" in Saalfelden, 2009 (photo by Davide Leonardi)
Background information
Genres Jazz
Instruments Tenor saxophone, piano, keyboards, drums, percussion

Peter Apfelbaum (born 1960) is an American avant-garde jazz pianist, tenor saxophonist, drummer and composer born in Berkeley, California. He first emerged on the jazz scene in the late 1970s, performing with Carla Bley from 1978–1982 and touring with Warren Smith and Karl Berger. Around this time Apfelbaum also studied and worked with musicians involved with the Creative Music Studio in Woodstock, New York. He graduated from Berkeley High School in 1978 in a class that included jazz pianist Benny Green.

Apfelbaum has made an impact on the avant-garde jazz and world music scene since the late 1970s and 1980s. He is a well known multi-instrumentalist and composer. His three main instruments are tenor saxophone, piano, and drums, but he has recorded and performed with a diverse array of percussion, wind, and other instruments. He has composed suites for various artists (including Don Cherry) as well as his 17-piece group The Hieroglyphics Ensemble. In 1990 Apfelbaum toured and recorded with Cherry in the group Multikulti, playing both piano and saxophone. In the early 1990s, Apfelbaum opened shows for The Grateful Dead with The Hieroglyphics Ensemble. Apfelbaum formed The Hieroglyphics Ensemble with jazz musicians from the San Francisco Bay Area, including Jeff Cressman, Will Bernard, Norbert Stachel, Jessica Jones, Tony Jones, Peck Almond, Dezon Claiborne, Josh Jones, Jai Uttal, and many others. In 1991 his album "Signs Of Life," recorded with The Hieroglyphics Ensemble, went to No. 14 on Billboard (magazine)'s "top contemporary jazz albums.[1] The latest incarnation of this group, The New York Hieroglyphics, released "It Is Written" in 2005, featuring members from the original group and New York-based musicians such as Patrice Blanchard, Dafnis Prieto, Josh Roseman, and Abdoulaye Diabate. His compositions and performances have influenced many artists active in the contemporary jazz fusion scene. His work recombines and synthesizes varieties of world music (i.e. various non-Western diasporic musical traditions) with experimental jazz idioms.[2] Of how his music came into being, Apfelbaum writes: "My vocabulary reflects the fact that I started life as a drummer, was trained in jazz theory, blues and gospel music as a pre-teenager, became absorbed in African and Latin music as a teenager, listened to a lot of contemporary classical music, worked in R&B, reggae, blues, Latin, African, jazz, funk, Middle Eastern and Indian bands and, for as long as I can remember, I've been fascinated by how sounds can be fitted together."[3]

Peter Apfelbaum and Paul Shapiro (photo by Sheldon Levy)

Contents

  • Discography 1
    • As leader 1.1
    • As sideman 1.2
  • References 2

Discography

As leader

  • Signs Of Life (Polygram, 1991)
  • Jodoji Brightness (Polygram, 1992)
  • Luminous Charms (Gramavision, 1996)
  • It Is Written (ACT, 2005)

As sideman

With Cyro Baptista

With Don Cherry

References

  1. ^ All Music
  2. ^ Down Beat Profile
  3. ^ http://www.peterapfelbaum.com/
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.