World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Pneumoperitoneum

Article Id: WHEBN0003299746
Reproduction Date:

Title: Pneumoperitoneum  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Chilaiditi syndrome, Football sign, High-frequency ventilation, Peritonitis, List of ICD-9 codes 520–579: diseases of the digestive system
Collection: Disorders of Fascia, Peritoneum Disorders
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Pneumoperitoneum

Pneumoperitoneum
Frontal chest X-ray. The air bubble below the right hemidiaphragm (on the left of the image) is a pneumoperitoneum.
Classification and external resources
ICD-10 K66.8
ICD-9-CM 568.89, 770.2
DiseasesDB 31511
eMedicine radio/562
MeSH D011027
Another pneumoperitoneum on chest X-ray.
Pneumoperitoneum seen on X-ray with the patient lying on his left side.

Pneumoperitoneum is the presence of air or gas in the abdominal (peritoneal) cavity. It is often seen on X-ray, but small amounts are often missed, and CT is nowadays regarded as a criterion standard in the assessment of a pneumoperitoneum.[1] CT can visualize quantities as small as 5 cm³ of air or gas. The most common cause is a perforated abdominal viscus, generally a perforated peptic ulcer, although any part of the bowel may perforate from a benign ulcer, tumor or abdominal trauma. A perforated appendix seldom causes a pneumoperitoneum.

In the mid-twentieth century, an "artificial" pneumoperitoneum was sometimes intentionally administered as a treatment for a hiatal hernia. This was achieved by insufflating the abdomen with carbon dioxide. The practice is currently used by surgical teams in order to perform laparoscopic surgery.

Contents

  • Causes 1
  • Differential diagnosis 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4

Causes

Differential diagnosis

Subphrenic abscess, bowel interposed between diaphragm and liver (Chilaiditi syndrome), and linear atelectasis at the base of the lungs can simulate free air under the diaphragm on a chest X-ray.

See also

References

  1. ^ Ali Nawaz Khan. ""eMedicine.com: Pneumoperitoneum. 
  2. ^ Necrotizing Enterocolitis Bugs, Drugs and Things That Go Bump in the Night
  3. ^ Sexual Activity as Cause for Non-Surgical Pneumoperitoneum
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.