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Poitiers Cathedral

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Title: Poitiers Cathedral  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Subject: Poitiers, François-Henri Clicquot, Romano-Gothic, Simon of Cramaud, Basilica churches in France
Collection: Basilica Churches in France, Cathedrals in France, Churches in Poitiers
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Poitiers Cathedral

Poitiers Cathedral
The organ of the Cathédrale Saint-Pierre de Poitiers, built by François-Henri Clicquot and Claude-François Clicquot

Poiters Cathedral (Cathédrale Saint-Pierre de Poitiers) is a Roman Catholic cathedral in Poitiers, France. It is the seat of the Archbishop of Poitiers.

Its construction began in 1162 by Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine on the ruins of a Roman basilica, and work was well advanced by the end of the 12th century. It is the largest medieval monument in the city of Poitiers.

It is built in the Romanesque and Early Gothic styles, the latter predominating. It consists of three naves almost equal in height and width, all three of which decrease towards the west, thus enhancing the perspective. Its length is 308 ft., and the keystone of the central vaulted roof is 89 ft. above the pavement. There is no apse, and the exterior generally has a heavy appearance. The principal front, which is broad relative to its height, has unfinished side-towers 105 and 110 ft. tall, begun in the 13th century.

Most of the windows of the choir and the transepts preserve their stained glass of the 12th and 13th centuries; the end window, which is certainly the first in the order of time, contains the figures of Henry II and Eleanor. The choir stalls, carved between 1235 and 1257, are among the oldest in France.

On the night of 25 December 1681 the organ was destroyed by fire. It was not until 1770-78 that a campaign was launched to build a replacement. François-Henri Clicquot, at that time

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