World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Posterior spinal artery

Article Id: WHEBN0006695120
Reproduction Date:

Title: Posterior spinal artery  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Anterior spinal artery, Arterial tree, Dorsal artery, Masseteric artery, Spinal cord
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Posterior spinal artery

Posterior spinal artery
The three major arteries of the cerebellum: the SCA, AICA, and PICA. (Posterior spinal artery is not labeled, but region is visible.)
Details
Latin Arteria spinalis posterior
Source Vertebral or
posterior inferior cerebellar
Branches Descending and ascending branch
Posterior spinal veins
Dorlands
/Elsevier
a_61/12156012
Anatomical terminology

The posterior spinal artery (dorsal spinal artery) arises from the vertebral artery, adjacent to the medulla oblongata.

Path

It passes posteriorly to descend the medulla passing in front of the posterior roots of the spinal nerves. Along its course it is reinforced by a succession of segmental or radiculopial branches, which enter the vertebral canal through the intervertebral foramina, forming a plexus called the vasocorona. Below the medulla spinalis and upper cervical spine, the posterior spinal arteries are rather discontinuous; unlike the anterior spinal artery, which can be traced as a distinct channel throughout its course, the posterior spinal arteries are seen as somewhat larger longitudinal channels of an extensive pial arterial meshwork. At the level of the conus medullaris, the posterior spinals are more frequently seen as distinct arteries, communicating with the anterior spinal artery to form a characteristic "basket" which angiographically defines the caudal extent of the spinal cord and its transition to the cauda equina.

Branches from the posterior spinal arteries form a free anastomosis around the posterior roots of the spinal nerves, and communicate, by means of very tortuous transverse branches, with the vessels of the opposite side.

Close to its origin each posterior spinal artery gives off an ascending branch, which ends ipsilaterally near the fourth ventricle.

The posterior spinal artery can often originate from the posterior inferior cerebellar artery, rather than the vertebral.

References

This article incorporates text in the public domain from the 20th edition of Gray's Anatomy (1918)

External links

  • http://neuroangio.org/spinal-vascular-anatomy/spinal-arterial-anatomy/
  • PDF
  • Diagram at nih.gov
  • Image at anaesthesiauk.com
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.