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Princess Mary, Duchess of Gloucester and Edinburgh

 

Princess Mary, Duchess of Gloucester and Edinburgh

Princess Mary
Duchess of Gloucester and Edinburgh
Born (1776-04-25)25 April 1776
Buckingham Palace, London, England
Died 30 April 1857(1857-04-30) (aged 81)
Gloucester House, London
Burial 8 May 1857
Windsor
Spouse Prince William Frederick, Duke of Gloucester and Edinburgh
House House of Hanover
Father George III of Great Britain
Mother Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz

Princess Mary, Duchess of Gloucester and Edinburgh (25 April 1776 – 30 April 1857) was the 11th child and fourth daughter of King George III of the United Kingdom.

She married her first cousin, Gloucester House, London.

Contents

  • Early life 1
  • Marriage 2
  • Titles, styles and arms 3
    • Titles and styles 3.1
    • Arms 3.2
  • Ancestors 4
  • See also 5
  • References 6
  • External links 7

Early life

Princess Mary was born, on 25 April 1776, at Queen Charlotte, the daughter of Charles, reigning Duke of Mecklenburg-Strelitz.

Princess Mary aged six.

Mary was christened on 19 May 1776, in the Great Council Chamber at St. James's Palace, by Frederick Cornwallis, The Archbishop of Canterbury. Her godparents were:

Mary at left, aged nine, with her two younger sisters Sophia and Amelia in 1785. Painted by John Singleton Copley

Daguerreotype of Princess Mary
1856 daguerreotype of Princess Mary (seated far right). Sitting to her left are Queen Victoria and Princess Alice. Standing is the Prince of Wales (later King Edward VII). Daguerreotype by Antoine Claudet

According to author and historian Flora Fraser, Mary was considered to be the most beautiful daughter of George III. Mary danced a mourning.

Mary's youngest sister and beloved companion Princess Amelia called her "Mama's tool" because of her obedient nature. Amelia's premature death in 1810 devastated her sister, who had nursed her devotedly during her painful illness.

Marriage

Mary's upbringing was very sheltered and she spent most of her time with her parents and sisters. King George and Queen Charlotte were keen to shelter their children, particularly the girls. Mary, however, married on 22 July 1816, to her first cousin, The Prince Regent, raised the bridegroom's style from Highness to Royal Highness, an attribute to which Mary's rank as daughter of the King already entitled her.

The couple lived at Bagshot Park, but after William's death she moved to White Lodge in Richmond Park. They had no children together. Princess Mary was said to be the favourite aunt of her niece, Queen Victoria.

Princess Mary was quite close to her eldest brother, and she shared his dislike toward his wife Caroline of Brunswick. When the latter left for Italy, Princess Mary congratulated her brother "on the prospect of a good riddance. Heaven grant that she may not return again and that we may never see more of her."[3]

Titles, styles and arms

Titles and styles

  • 25 April 1776 – 22 July 1816: Her Royal Highness The Princess Mary
  • 22 July 1816 – 30 April 1857: Her Royal Highness The Duchess of Gloucester and Edinburgh

Arms

As of 1789, as a daughter of the sovereign, Mary had use of the arms of the kingdom, differenced by a label argent of three points, the centre point bearing a rose gules, the outer points each bearing a canton gules.[4]

Ancestors

See also

References

  1. ^ Yvonne's Royalty Home Page: Royal Christenings
  2. ^ a b Lane, Henry M. (1911). The Royal Daughters of England. London. p. 191. 
  3. ^ Charlotte Zeepvat: George III's Children, p. 106
  4. ^ Marks of Cadency in the British Royal Family

External links

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